Parts for OLD craftsman table saw


I've been given an early 1950s Craftsman/Emerson Electric Co. Model# 113 27520 table saw. It runs, but the cranks are broken, it has no stand and the table is a little on the small side. What can I do to increase the table size, and will a newer Craftsman stand work with such an old saw? Where can I find replacement cranks? Is it worth anything if I try to sell it to get a newer saw? I really only use it for construction projects, ripping trim molding and playwood, that kind of thing.
Thanks- Brian
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That would be PLYwood of course, not PLAYwood :-)
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Go to www.sears.com, enable cookies and select parts. Enter your part number and you'll be able to get a list of available parts.
HTH,
Vic

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When you say the cranks are broken, do you mean the handle or the mechanism?

You can build an extension to one side, and an outfeed table behind it.
, and will a newer Craftsman stand work with

Build your own out of plywood, make it large enough to support your extension. You can then store all your table saw related stuff under the saw.

Sears does have parts, but for the old stuff it's generally just the basic hardware and electrical stuff that they still have. If it's just the handle, you can probably find something more recent that has the same size shaft. In the meantime, a pair of locking pliers...

Think about it. The expensive parts of a saw are a) the cast iron b) the motor c) the fence if it's a good one. If you've got a working motor and a flat top, even if it's a little small, and you can resolve the other issues then buying a good fence for it will make it out perform anything you could buy without spending a lot more money.
-Leuf
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Yes, the handles themselves. Plus all the locks/gears/etc seem to have a lot of play, I think this TS has been pretty heavily used.
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Brian wrote:

You can build side and outfeed table extensions, or extension wings may still be available. Your model number turns up parts listings at the Sears parts ordering page.

Not likely.

Through Sears parts - on mine the handwheels were there, but not the crank handles. Instead of buying replacements, I made a little handle - 1" dowel about 6" long with a 1/4" metal rod epoxied into the end: __________________ | |____ | ____| |__________________|
much cheaper.

If it works, you're better off keeping it - I don't think it would sell for much. The castings were heavy duty back then. If the bearings are worn, they can be replaced. I got a better miter gauge and fence, though. There are a couple pictures of mine at http://home.san.rr.com/jeffnann/WoodWorking/WoodWorking.html
--
JeffB
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JeffB wrote:

Thanks JeffB, what you've done with your saw is very impressive! If it's not too much trouble can you take a couple detailed pictures of the saw and email them to me? That fence system looks great; where did you get it?
Thanks- Brian
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I have an early 1950's Craftsman TS and it's still rock solid. The worst part is the old fence which just requires careful adjustment.
If I remember correctly, at that time Craftsman saws were made by Emerson which I think is in St. Louis though I'm not sure.
I bought mine for $200 in 89-90 or so. A gentlemen had put it in a sale paper. I went to look and he had a passel of other stuff as well.. Turns out I got the TS, Craftsman King-Seeley BS and a Walker-Turner Wood Lathe for $600. He had made stands for each, all with switches and motors. He also crafted extension tables for the TS since he was a steelworker/welder. All in all a decent buy. Worst part was the band saw, which is more or less minimal. But i'd have a hard time getting rid of the TS.
--
Regards,
JP
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