Particle Boad screws

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A cross dowel is used to join two pieces of wood. That's not what I needed to do.
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The issue was how to get strong threads in particle board. Cross dowels are used for this, in lots of cheap furniture.
Joe Gwinn
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

While they are how do you get them in place in an existing desktop?
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I don't have a drawing of the desktop, but assume that one can drill holes.
Alternately, I've used a bit of sheet metal with threaded holes and a machine screw from the other side.
Particle board just isn't that good a material for wood screws and the like.
Joe Gwinn
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 18:17:12 -0400, "J. Clarke"

With a drill? Not sure what your question really is here.
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says...

He's fastening a keyboard drawer to the bottom of a desktop. That typically means that he needs four fasteners, two near the edge and two 6-12 inches from the edge. Are you proposing that he manage somehow to drill a straight 12-inch deep hole into an existing particle board desktop from the edge, so as to put in the cross-dowel? If not, then what are you proposing?
And if he objects to fasteners showing on the top of the desk, do you really thing that holes drilled in the edge are going to be any more acceptable?
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On Tue, 14 Jul 2015 03:23:40 -0400, "J. Clarke"

There is some confusion about exactly what he needs. Is he attaching to the bottom surface or the front edge?

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On 7/14/2015 1:06 PM, krw wrote:

Not sure if anyone else has suggested this, but it seems to me, he should epoxy a piece of real wood to the underside of the desktop and then use normal wood screws.
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FrozenNorth wrote:

Bingo!
Or screw a piece of wood at each side and another on top of those crosswide (no epoxy needed)
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I did... but was thinking about trying to keep the overall thickness close to the same. It would be fairly easy to take a piece of wood and glue it (epoxy or whatever you like) to the bottom of the desk top. Lots of glue surface area, especially if the pieces are flat.
Puckdropper
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On Tuesday, July 14, 2015 at 4:26:02 PM UTC-4, Puckdropper at dot wrote:


e



Actually, it would be even better if the flat pieces were roughed up/groove d to give the epoxy something the bite into. A Dremel with a reinforced cut off wheel or saw blade would make quick work of randomly placed angled groo ves in both the wood and particle board (boad?) to lock both pieces togethe r.
Another suggestion that I don't think I've seen would be to bore some holes in the p-board and epoxy nuts into the bottom, then use bolts through the brackets. Once again, a Dremel could be used to rough up the sides of the n uts as well as the sides of the holes to give the epoxy some bite.
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On Tuesday, July 14, 2015 at 1:07:00 PM UTC-4, krw wrote:
...snip...

I'm not sure why you think there is confusion. On July 11th he said:
"One leg of the "C"-bracket is screwed into the bottom of a pull-out keyboard shelf. The other leg of the bracket is screwed into the bottom of the desk top. The shelf and the desk top are each 3/4"-inch thick.
The screws cannot go all the way through the shelf or the desktop. "
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Cross dowels (with connector bolts) are used to make strong joints when two pieces of wood are joined at a right angle.
But I need a way to attach a bracket to the face of a particle board so the screws don't pull out of the particle board.
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I already tried sheet metal screws but they just pulled out of the particle board under normal "keyboarding".
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 3:37:28 PM UTC-4, gary wrote:

New holes or the existing (and probably) larger holes from the original euro screws?
If you used the original holes without any filler, I'm not at all surprised that they pulled out.
BTW, you could use elevator bolts flush mounted through the top and call it a "design feature". ;-)
This one is silver, but they come in black and bronze colors also:
http://www.yorkfasteners.com/images/bolts/ElevatorBoltsL.jpg
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You might try sheet metal angle brackets like you can get at HD/Lowes. And glue.
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I think he's saying that working the keyboard, not pushing the drawer in and out, is the problem. Perhaps he's an excitable typist, and pounds the keyboard :-)
John
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On Tue, 14 Jul 2015 02:29:22 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

...or rests his arms on the keyboard (or the desk in front of it), like I imagine most of us do.
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I drilled new holes for the sheet metal screws. The sheet metal screws were the size of the holes in the bracket.
Re: Elevator bolts: I don't want to drill the holes all the way through the particle board.
The screws pulled out of the particle board when I was typing (not when sliding the keyboard shelf in and out).
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Don't predrill, just put the screw in. Sheet metal screws usually have pretty decent heads, so they're easy to start with the appropriate screwdriver. (If you're using Phillips head screws, make sure you have the right size. It will likely be a #2. To check, put the screw on the driver and try to wiggle it around. If it moves easily, the driver is too small.)
Puckdropper
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