Panel Glue-up set time

I am curious as to how long I need to leave a glued-up panel in clamps before I can remove the clamps and safely run it through a portable thickness planer. Glue used is Titebond original glue. It's been a little over 4 hours now and I think it is ready, but wonder if I need wait 24 hours before safely proceeding with the cleanup.
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

little
Depends a little on weather conditions in your area to some degree. 4 hours may be ok, but if its a crucial project, I'd be more inclined to wait overnight for the glue to finish curing.
I also recently had a panel glue up situation with Titebond, and there was a noticable visual and tactile difference in the glue lines between a 4 hour and 24 hour waiting period.
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Veritas Shelf Drilling Jig - Ryobi CID1802V 18v Cordless Drill - Workshop Essentials Under $30 - Festool PS 300 Jigsaws - Delta Universal Tenoning Jig ------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 23:55:25 GMT, "Brian in Vancouver, BC"

grab time is about 20 minutes, but it's still a bit fragile at that point. at 4 hours you can safely take it out of the clamps, though I'd still handle it carefully until tomorrow.     Bridger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Brian in Vancouver, BC"wrote in message

little
Keep it in the clamps until tomorrow ... not necessarily for the "glue to dry", but to keep problems showing up in the next day or so along the glue line.
As the glue dries, it absorbs moisture from the surrounding wood, said wood will have a tendency to shrink as the moisture is removed. If you plane/mill it too soon, you may find yourself with a depression along the glue line because of the material you removed too soon.
Doesn't always happen, just often enough to make you wish you'd had more patience.
Rule of thumb is to let the glue cure at least 24 hours before milling, planing. If I leave it in the clamps overnight, it removes all temptation.
Just my experience ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/16/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman (Tarzan?); ;>}
I like your answer about shrinkage and now I remember seeing this comment in the past. I just thought I was being paranoid about not "getting on with it". I will wait for tomorrow, but with a limited number of clamps, this panel making could take a long time.
Thanks to ALL for ALL the responses.
Brian
| > I am curious as to how long I need to leave a glued-up panel in clamps | > before I can remove the clamps and safely run it through a portable | > thickness planer. Glue used is Titebond original glue. It's been a | little | > over 4 hours now and I think it is ready, but wonder if I need wait 24 | > hours before safely proceeding with the cleanup. | | | Keep it in the clamps until tomorrow ... not necessarily for the "glue to | dry", but to keep problems showing up in the next day or so along the glue | line. | | As the glue dries, it absorbs moisture from the surrounding wood, said wood | will have a tendency to shrink as the moisture is removed. If you plane/mill | it too soon, you may find yourself with a depression along the glue line | because of the material you removed too soon. | | Doesn't always happen, just often enough to make you wish you'd had more | patience. | | Rule of thumb is to let the glue cure at least 24 hours before milling, | planing. If I leave it in the clamps overnight, it removes all temptation. | | Just my experience ... | | -- | www.e-woodshop.net | Last update: 1/16/04 | |
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
An hour is plenty to unclamp (much less actually), but working it is another thing. I like 24 hours before running through a planer. You risk shrink lines at your joints if you plane or sand too soon.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.bill.pounds.net/woodshop

little
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 23:55:25 GMT, "Brian in Vancouver, BC"

I've done the same after 4 hours or so. Squeeze out is a factor. If you've got a lot of soft glue it may make a mess of the planer and surface. The glue joints themselves should be pretty set at 4 hours, at normal 70 degree F temps and average humidity.
If you've got a lot of squeeze out, I'd remove it with a sharp chisel, let things dry a bit more and then go for it.
I usually clean up any squeeze out with a sharp chisel at about the one hour mark, when the glue is at approximately booger consistency.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Barry;
Thanks for the advise. Actually, I used a cabinet scraper at about the 3 hour mark to remove the squeeze out glue.
Brian
in message wrote: | | >I am curious as to how long I need to leave a glued-up panel in clamps | >before I can remove the clamps and safely run it through a portable | >thickness planer. Glue used is Titebond original glue. It's been a little | >over 4 hours now and I think it is ready, but wonder if I need wait 24 | >hours before safely proceeding with the cleanup. | > | >Brian | | I've done the same after 4 hours or so. Squeeze out is a factor. | If you've got a lot of soft glue it may make a mess of the planer and | surface. The glue joints themselves should be pretty set at 4 hours, | at normal 70 degree F temps and average humidity. | | If you've got a lot of squeeze out, I'd remove it with a sharp chisel, | let things dry a bit more and then go for it. | | I usually clean up any squeeze out with a sharp chisel at about the | one hour mark, when the glue is at approximately booger consistency. | | Barry |
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Barry wrote:>I usually clean up any squeeze out with a sharp chisel at about the

Yes, don't let the squeeze-out cure too much, or you'll risk tear-out of the material when scraping the dried glue off.DAMHIKT. Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Let it cure for the 24hrs would be my advice
John
On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 23:55:25 GMT, "Brian in Vancouver, BC"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 23:55:25 GMT, "Brian in Vancouver, BC"

I wait overnight before machining a glue up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I usually let it set overnight also. Another suggestion is to buy more clamps! :-)
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jerry Gilreath responds:

I'd unclamp at 4 hours, but I wouldn't machine or handle heavily (scrape glue lines) for another 8-10 hours. According to Franklin, Titebond needs 45-60 minutes of clamp time. Allowing for variables, 4 times the max figure seems a good safety margin, but I don't think I'd want to stress the result before the 12 hours (IIRC) they recommend. Charlie Self "Character is much easier kept than recovered." Thomas Paine
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.