panasonic 15.6V drill


I am about to buy this cordliss drill, but was wondering if anyone has any experience/opinions on how much of a difference there is between the 15.6V and an 18V (panasonic has an 18V for ~$40 more, but I like the idea of lighter/smaller). I know the 15.6 volt will serve most of my needs, but occasionally I want to drill though studs (for running wires, e.g.) or 3/4" plywood, treated lumber, etc., and have found my old Ryobi 12V inadequte for such tasks (well, the batteries are pretty old in that one). Will the 15.6V have the torque to accomplish such tasks, in anyone's experience? thx
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Launching on your key word "occasionally", you might want to consider the advantage of lighter/smaller augmented with a separate corded drill. Not only will the corded drill have gobs of power, but it will turn much, much faster for making clean holes for things like dowels and pocket holes. A good corded drill can be purchased for about $60. I have a couple of swinging overhead power outlets in my shop and using corded tools is not half bad with that setup.
Bob
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I haven't used the panasonic 15.6, but I'm sure it could go through studs or 3/4 plywood. I have a 16.8V Craftsman, which I'd bet isn't as good as the Panasonic. I've used a 1.5" spade bit through two layers of 3/4 ply, with no problems. From everything I've read and heard, today's cordless drills (even 12V and 14.4) are sufficient for just about anything except the heaviest drilling. Sorry for the lack of first-hand experience with the tool you mention, but I've seen it rated very highly in a few separate review articles, and I agree the benefits of light weight and better maneuverability would outweigh the occasional benefit of slightly higher torque. Good luck, Andy
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I'm with you on that, BillyBob. I use a fair bit of corded drills.. in fact, whenever I can...certainly around the shop. There is no substitute for the raw power and rpm. I use cordless tools for all the obvious reasons, but never 'just because I can'. I was visiting a friend's production shop the other day, and he HAD to use his new DeWaltDisney cordless circular saw to do a blind cut. I cannot imagine ever doing any serious work with one of those. Cords are fine by me..it's not as if by using them you follow them into the nearest bordello or anything like that. I think that there is way too much emphasis on the cordless concept. I mean.. a cordless sawz-all? Cool tool if you're a burglar.
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scribbled:

Incredibly useful in field dressing moose and other large gentle innocent forest creatures you happen to murder. Take at least two batteries along. DAMHIKT.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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*slaps self on forehead*
...now why on earth didn't I think of that?
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I won't enter the fray about cordless tool in the shop, because I'm an electrician, and use many corless tools everyday. I've been using the Dewalt 18 volt system, drills, hammerdrill, sawzall, wood circular saw, metal cutting circular saw, flashlight for a few years. After repair & replacement of tools and batteries, I'm now trying the 15.6 volt Panasonic. A few professional carpenters I know have been swearing by their Panasonics for years. I just got a metal cutting circular saw & drill/driver combo last week, and hope to start using them later this week. The drill seems pretty strong, but I'll let you know off list my review if interested.
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I've had a Panasonic 15.6V drill for six months and it is by far the best cordless drill I have ever used. Should do everything you need without any problems.
Oldun
I am about to buy this cordliss drill, but was wondering if anyone has any experience/opinions on how much of a difference there is between the 15.6V and an 18V (panasonic has an 18V for ~$40 more, but I like the idea of lighter/smaller). I know the 15.6 volt will serve most of my needs, but occasionally I want to drill though studs (for running wires, e.g.) or 3/4" plywood, treated lumber, etc., and have found my old Ryobi 12V inadequte for such tasks (well, the batteries are pretty old in that one). Will the 15.6V have the torque to accomplish such tasks, in anyone's experience? thx
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chester wrote:

I've had the 15.6V for several years. It is the only cordless that I have (excepting a flashlight and radio). Great tool. I use it for general shop use and for jobsite use. If I am going to drill a bunch of holes for something like shelf supports, I will get out the corded Craftsman. A great tool.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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I just got a 15.6V Panasonic and tried a test on a couple of 2 x 4 scraps in the basement...it CAN shear the top off a 10 x 3 SS wood screw. (I think it is 303 SS, not 316 SS.) Do you need more torque than that?
George

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9.6 volt will do what you are asking. IMHO get the smaller voltage drill to save weight and spend the extra 40 on a cheap corded drill for the odd jobs.
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