Painting pressure treated lumber

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I've read you have to delay painting PT lumber from everywhere from two weeks to a year. Latex paint... What's the deal?
And, how does one tell if PT wood is ready to be painted? It feels quite wet from the lumberyard/HD, but seems much drier in a cupla days. Does rain further extend the wait? Does a sprayer allow you paint sooner than brushing/rolling??
Also, just curious: Will non-PT wood last as long as PT wood (outside, of course), if it thoroughly painted? In the northeast. Any special painting methods required?
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EA




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On 9/29/12 12:41 PM, Existential Angst wrote:

I don't know how long you need to wait.
As for paint... might I suggest an opaque stain. Depending on the concentration and size of pigment, it will get deeper into the grain of the wood than paint, but from a distance looks like paint. It lasts a lot longer than paint and fades instead of flaking/peeling.
Last porch I built, I used PT lumber with a white opaque stain. Up close you could still see the grain of the wood, which was an attractive feature. From the road, it looked like a newly painted white porch. It stayed bright white for several years.
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Good idear, I'll look into it. I wouldn't use white stain tho, something red-ish -- which fades quickly in ultraviolet. Is there an exterior polyurethane that can protect pigments form UV? Or are there UV-impervious pigments?
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EA


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On 9/29/12 12:56 PM, Existential Angst wrote:

I just brought up white because it's the color we used on our porch. I'm no expert but in my experience nothing will stand up to UV... for very long. I'm sure a good paint shop could tell you what's out there that works best. Maintaining outdoor woodwork has always been arduous. Engineered composite lumber has held up to UV so far, as advertised, from what I can tell.
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I put rec.woodworking back in the header, figgered a few would find this useful.
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EA


"nestork" < snipped-for-privacy@diybanter.com> wrote in message
news: snipped-for-privacy@diybanter.com...
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On 9/29/2012 12:41 PM, Existential Angst wrote:

PT lumber is typically very very high in moisture content. Read that as often soaking wet. Paint needs to stay dry on the side that it adheres to a surface. If moisture saturates the surface under the paint the paint will fail.

Use a moisture meter or wait at least year. Method of application has nothing to do with how long the paint will last on a poor surface.
That said some better lumber yards, not home centers, carry kiln dried PT lumber, this is what you want if you want to paint right away.

That will depend on the wood. Fur, SYP, mahogany, ipe, cedar are a few commonly used woods for out door use with no protection or paint.
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On Sat, 29 Sep 2012 13:41:28 -0400, "Existential Angst"

According to the Forest Products Lab:
"Contrary to the belief of many consumer's and paint companies, it is not necessary to allow newly installed pressure-treated wood to weather or season for long periods of time before applying a coating. Most newly built CCA treated wood decks can band should be protected with a water repellent, toner or semi-transparent stain as soon as possible after construction. Research has shown that exposing unprotected wood to weathering for even short periods of time can cause surface damage. This damaged surface reduces the ability of the wood to hold onto subsequently applied coatingsa situation that can ultimately lead to premature coatings failure. This, unless the new treated wood is still very wet, it should be coated as soon as possible after deck construction. If the wood is obviously wet, no more than 2-3 weeks of air-drying should be allowed before a coating is applied."
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2000/ross00b.pdf
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Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 9/29/2012 1:51 PM, Nova wrote:

Good to know but I noticed that most suggested coverings that you mentioned above are not opaque, as paint is. So I would surmise that paint would not be a good coating for new PT wood.
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wrote:

I really can't think of anyone I know who actually painted and entire deck. This summer my neighbor did paint the railings and pergola on his deck. I can let you know how it holds up in a few years. I would guess given, the higher amount of solids in paint, that it will hold up better than stain.
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I painted all the (PT) railings on my deck and front porch on my VT house. Peeling was a major problem and I had to repaint every couple of years. Stain didn't last any longer.
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On Sat, 29 Sep 2012 17:41:18 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Which would make sense since PT wood is already engorged with chemical preservatives. There isn't any available wood fibre left for the paint to soak in and adhere to it.
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On 9/29/2012 2:54 PM, Nova wrote:

The OP mentioned painting PT lumber. Not sure in the North but exterior paints tend to hold up very well compared to stains. Still they need to be applied to a suitable surface, a dry one. IIRC Hardi strongly suggests a primer on their products to block moisture from coming in contact with the back side of the paint surface. I personally have not had great results with painting fresh PT lumber but do agree that the longer you wait the trade off of a less than desirable surface, appearance wise becomes another problem in itself.
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wrote:

Cement board like Hardi should be painted on all six sides prior to going up on a house. Ditto wood products.
-- Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself. -- Thomas Jefferson
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On Sat, 29 Sep 2012 17:15:17 -0700, Larry Jaques

I understand the reasoning behind painting all six sides of wood (painting the ends is way too much6 of a PITA) but why Hardi? Doesn't it come primed?
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On 9/29/2012 7:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Hardi may all come primed now but it did not always. It used to come in a cement grey color.
And, I can assure you 90% of Hardi does not get primed on all six sides. Construction crews don't paint the ends after cutting to length. I suspect that caulk will substitute.
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wrote:

You're probably right, but it's taught in the BEST Continuing Ed class that I just finished yesterday. That very many people do so is fairly unlikely, but the better builders will, and I will in the future. Swingy, what's your company's stance on this?
I already prime cuts in PT because I know the wood will quickly corrupt otherwise. I tried for over a year to find a termiticide/stain on the market but they discontinued it and our gov't, in its wisdom, made it -illegal- to make your own replacement or modify any existing product! I now use a brown deck stain (with mildewcide but no bug killer) on brown PT and you can still buy green-died preservative (I have some Jassco Termin-8 for the green PT.)
Not priming every cut reduces the lifetime of the siding. That's why JH strongly suggests that we do prime it everywhere, back and cuts. If your paint peels and you didn't prime, you're SOL.
-- Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself. -- Thomas Jefferson
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On 9/30/2012 9:56 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Yeah, sorry I did not mean to sound like I was disputing what you said, I agree totally. It just does not happen most of the time. As I mentioned, Hardi gets cut and hopefully if possible it is caulked to cover the newly exposed surface. Still my old next door neighbor had the older unprimed Hardi installed on their house and have yet to paint it at all 6~7 years later, still looks the same. The cement color very closely matched the color of the rest of the house.
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Cut ends need to be primed or painted on the primed product, edge coated on the colored product with the appropriate colored Hardie edge coat. You don't caulk the colorplus product at all, ever.
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On 10/1/2012 12:29 AM, Swingman wrote:

Does Hardi edge coat come with the order of colorplus or do you have to know to ask for that product?
On another note, the older Hardi product specifically indicated to caulk the joints, non-primed and non-colored. Do you just leave the joint open now, so to speak?
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On 10/1/2012 8:22 AM, Leon wrote:

There is an edge/touchup kit available from James Hardie, but it is faster to have the color matched with an exterior paint at a paint store.

No, you can caulk the primed product, you just don't caulk their colorplus product at all. It looks funky, and caulk eventually turns a different color than the product after weathering.
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