Painting Concrete Walls

Shop will be in the basement. I want to paint the basement walls white. Basement is dry. Great drainage of water away from the foundation. Poured concrete walls. Poured in 1999. Concrete forms used for the basement had that brick mold pattern in them. Both sides of the walls. Supposed to look like bricks. 162 linear feet of basement walls to paint. 8 feet tall. Approximately 1,300 square feet of wall surface with this brick mold pattern in it. Best way to appy the paint to the walls? Roller with really thick, long nap? Airless sprayer? What performance level is needed for an airless sprayer? Very nice airless sprayers are about $75 per 24 hours locally.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
> Shop will be in the basement. I want to paint the basement walls > white. <snip> > Best way to appy > the paint to the walls? Roller with really thick, long nap?
Yep.
> Airless > sprayer?
Nope.
For a number of reasons, not the least of which is that a decent spray gun needs about 15 scfm.
To obtain that capacity, you will need a 5HP, 2 stage compressor with at least a 60-80 gal tank.
Cost: About $1,000 USD + installation.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

As stated, the sprayer is an airless sprayer designed specifically for spraying paint. No air is involved. No compressor is involved. The airless sprayer pumps the paint/liquid itself through the spray gun nozzle. Develops around 3,000 psi. Air does not carry the paint to the surface as in woodworking finishes. Examples of airless sprayers can be found at the Home Depot website by searching under the name "Magnum by Graco". Or at the Lowes website do a search on "SprayTECH DSP" or "SprayTECH Apex".

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
> As stated, the sprayer is an airless sprayer designed specifically for > spraying paint. No air is involved. No compressor is involved. The > airless sprayer pumps the paint/liquid itself through the spray gun > nozzle. Develops around 3,000 psi. Air does not carry the paint to > the surface as in woodworking finishes. Examples of airless sprayers > can be found at the Home Depot website by searching under the name > "Magnum by Graco". Or at the Lowes website do a search on "SprayTECH > DSP" or "SprayTECH Apex". >
Sorry, it was late and missed that; however, was involved as an OEM supplier to a company who was a manufacturer of these units.
Based on that experience, unless you are looking at a commercial unit designed to handle a lot of paint, like being able to completely paint a typical room in less than 5 minutes, you are probably not going to be happy with the performance.
My OEM dropped out of the market after a couple of years because they refused to build a low end product, so they could compete.
Personally, if Lowes and Home Depot sell it, I'm not usually not interested.
These days, they seem to only be interested in serving the bottom feeders which makes almost anything they sell suspect, IMHO.
As far as your project is concerned, by the time you mask everything off so you can spray, you can be critiquing your work with a cold one, if you roll it.
Getting the concrete primed and sealed will be the major task.
Have fun.
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
: As stated, the sprayer is an airless sprayer designed specifically for : spraying paint. No air is involved. No compressor is involved. The : airless sprayer pumps the paint/liquid itself through the spray gun : nozzle. Develops around 3,000 psi. Air does not carry the paint to : the surface as in woodworking finishes. Examples of airless sprayers : can be found at the Home Depot website by searching under the name : "Magnum by Graco".
This is what I would use. I've painted (real) brick with a roller, and one problem is the grooves will take up a lot of paint, which will then cause runs and drips.
I used a Magnum (the smallest one at HD) to paint to interior of a house. Very fast, and once you get the motion right the paint flow is easy to control.
Taping can take a while, and you should use a very good respirator, but this is the way to go.
    -- Andy Barss
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On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 06:45:17 GMT, Lew Hodgett

????
An airless paint sprayer should work fine. I have no idea what you're talking about above, but the ones that sit over a five gallon bucket work pretty well.
That being said, my vote would be for the roller- no chance of painting the upstairs by accident that way.
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What you DON'T want is one of those crappy Wagner sprayers. I'd probably opt for a roller. Actually, I'd insulate first where I live. If you are in a place that requires heat, the insulation is a good deal.
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On 14 Jan 2007 21:34:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

paint. The rental sprayer comes with a compressor. Clean out the spraying area first and mask off the entrance/windows, etc. Then buy the paint. White primer (oil or latex - you choose based on informed preference and suitable for bare concrete) is likely all you would need. Last get the sprayer. Take note ---- The last guy that used it may have used latex and the pump hoses are filled with water. Or he used oil based and the hoses are filled with solvent. Flush the sysem with the clean up stuff for the paint you will use before you actually paint. Ask the rental guy how to do that.
Pete
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Rent a sprayer, it will be well worth the $75. 1,300 sq feet is nothing, it will probably take you longer to mask off the things you do not want to paint then it will to actually paint. And it makes painting kinda fun.... not real fun, just kinda fun. ;)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Wow, we have the exact same basement. When we bought the house I never even noticed it, but everybody that comes downstairs makes a big deal out of it. I've never seen it anywhere else.
Anyway, we painted it light blue and I just used a roller, been 15+ years, still fine. I can't even imagine spraying in a basement, little specks of paint everywhere.
Some beer, couple of friends, an afternoon easy.
Where are you anyway?
-Jim
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jtpr wrote:

Middle of the Midwest. Brick mold foundation forms are probably used on 90+% of the new houses around here for the past 15 years. Probably 50% for the new houses built 10 years before that. When I first saw it on houses years ago I thought it was neat. But after owning a house with plain flat concrete walls and now the brick mold pattern walls, I think the brick mold pattern is just a harder to paint, dust catcher on the inside. It looks great outside compared to a flat foundation wall. Ideal would be brick mold onthe outside and flat on the inside. That way its easier to paint the basement walls or glue/screw studs and styrofoam insulation to the walls for finishing. And the small piece of foundation above grade outside with the brick mold does look better than flat concrete and its not too much surface area above grade to paint once every 5-10 years.
Basement is completely unfinished and mostly empty. Bare concrete walls and floor. Two small basement windows to tape off. Two outlets to tape off. Furnace/hot water heater to not spray/paint. 10 minutes to pile the basement contents into a pile in the middle of the room and put a plastic tarp over the pile to keep paint off. Another 10 minutes to take the important stuff out of the basement so there is no way it can get painted by accident. I plan to paint the floor after the walls so any minor paint drops won't be a problem.
I think I will try the roller first. $4 for a thick nap roller. I already have the wire grill to hang over the edge of the 5 gallon bucket. And a roller. So it won't be too onerous to see how rolling will work.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Well, I can tell you, I painted the exact same wall as this over 10 years ago. The idea was just a quick fix to clean it up so the kids would have a room they could mess up without us being all over them to clean it up (we put down padding and cheap industrial carpet too). I didn't seal or prime it. Just took a thick roller and some inexpensive paint and put it on. I'ts still on, no peeling or cracking, nothing. This is in S. NH. so the temp varies. Anyway, I'm not sure what you want for the final product, but if it is a quick fix like mine a roller should be good. Rollers aren't power tools, so you can drink beer while you use them... big plus.
-jtpr
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've had great results with Quikcrete multi-surface concrete sealer (a urethane oil-base product, smell is terrible), and recommend this as a first coat. Airless spray might work fine, but I'd stick to the shaggy roller; you'll want to touch up with a brush, anyhow (voids are inevitable), and did I mention, the odor is off-putting?
Controlling the paint coverage in spray is a tricky thing; you might not want to learn on an important project.
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