Painting bath and kitchen in a log building

Hello, all
What kind of paint should you recommend for the kitchen and bathroom in a log building: vapor-perme- able or not?
I am sorry if this is the wrong group, but I couldn't find a one more suitable to my question.
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Anton Shepelev

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It depends on several things, but I do have one over arching question, "Why paint at all?" After all, you spent a great deal, both now and in long term maintenance, to have a log home, why cover the object of your affection with a film finish?
Deb
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On 3/29/2015 8:27 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

Perhaps he is talking about cabinets.
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On 3/29/2015 9:27 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

I'd consider doing those rooms. You want the kitchen easily cleanable so you need a film barrier over the wood. A bit of color will also break the monotony of even the nicest wood.
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Dr. Deb to Anton Shepelev:

I was inexact because English is my second language. I meant a transparent coating that would preserve the wood texture and color. Untreated wood will be turning yellower and darker and will become nearly black in about 25-40 years. It happened with my previous house, and should like to prevent it this time.
Futhermore, where much vapour is generated untreated wood will actually decay.
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On 3/29/2015 12:15 PM, Anton Shepelev wrote:

Water based is less likely to change colors
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On 3/29/2015 12:15 PM, Anton Shepelev wrote:

As a builder I can say unequivocally, whatever Mike Marlow says.
Actual experience has no equal ...
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Mike Marlow:

I hope my e-mails have made it to your mail box haven't wound-up in the SPAM compartment.
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Mike Marlow:

No, my partitions are made of the same logs as the outer walls. I am asking about the coating of the walls of all rooms, whether it be internal walls or the inner sides of external walls.
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On 3/29/2015 8:41 AM, Anton Shepelev wrote:

I don't know enough about log construction to recommend. I'd go to a good paint store and ask about it. Not a clerk at Home Depot.
Or I'd call someone like these guys http://www.logfinish.com/ Looks like mostly outdoor stuff, but they probably know what is good inside.
Or check here http://log-homes.thefuntimesguide.com/2009/04/painting_log_walls.php
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Ed Pawlowski to Anton Shepelev:

I don't trust those guys even in large stores.

They have indoor coatings too, so I shall ask their advice. Thanks.

Nothing serious there.
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Anton Shepelev wrote:

Are you wanting to paint the inside of the logs, non-log interior walls or cabinets?
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dadiOH to Anton Shepelev:

All the walls in my house are log-walls. I want to choose a treatment/finish for the interrior surfaces of the logs, i.e. those that face inwards. I am not talking about furniture (cabinets) but about bare log walls.
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Anton Shepelev wrote:

OK. Elsewhere, you said you wanted a clear finish. As a practical matter, you have four choices... 1. poly 2. alkyd 3. nitrocellulose 4. acylic
If you want hardness and durability, oil based poly varnish would be my #1 choice. Water base poly would also be acceptable and could be easier to apply. Either would be more expensive than the other choices. If you wanted more than one coat, you would need to apply them at approximately four hour intervals.
I wouldn't consider pure alkyd varnish, hard to find and the poly would serve better.
I've never heard of nitrocellulose lacquer being used for something like this but I suppose it could be. I wouldn't.
There is an acrylic product called Sealkrete Original. It is used primarily for vertical, cementatious surfaces but can be used on pretty much anything. I have no experience with it on large wood surfaces but it might work. It is relatively inexpensive, water base and can be sprayed with a garden type sprayer. A recommended use is as a paint additive. It does not form a film unless multiple coats are applied; a film from it is not hard and brittle but rubbery/stretchy like most acrylic films. http://www.sealkrete.com/find-a-product/find-a-product/vertical-waterproofing/original.aspx
FWIW, the semi-log house in my sig has nothing on the interior log walls.
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dadiOH:

Thanks. I am considering coatings based on natural oils and waxes, such as the OSMO "waxes":
http://www.osmouk.com/sitechaptern.cfm?bookid=Products&chapter &page%7

Interesring. How old is it and in what condition are the logs on the inside?
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Anton Shepelev wrote:

Built in 1996, interior wood is fine, pristine essentially.
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dadiOH:

I shouldn't think it old enough to have darkened completely, but I should certainly expect some no- ticeable darkening after 20 years... Might it de- pend on the species of wood?
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To some degree, sure. It is Western red cedar.
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