Painting a Table Saw table?

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On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 21:03:30 -0600, "Matthew"

Couldn't the glare be a problem ?
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On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 07:24:41 -0500, the inscrutable GregP

It probably wouldn't be much worse than a clean, waxed arn surface.
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Personally I wouldn't paint it myself but here's something you might try. I have a table saw in my garage that I don't use often enough to keep the top shiny. I had a small empty cardboard box sitting on the table and when I removed it I noticed that the top under the cardboard was shiny but the rest of the top was kinda getting that darkened look to it. Not yet rust but just a slight discoloration. I cleaned the top up sprayed it down and cut a piece of cardboard the full size of the top. I used a folded up cabinet box so it's actually two layers. I leave the cardboard there until I use the saw. It may be that the cardboard is absorbing the moisture or that the cardboard acts like a vapor barrier or it might just be my imagination but the top is always shiny even after several months.
Mike O.
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My experience with this type of idea is that in a high-humidity area you will develop unbelievable rust under the cardboard in just a couple of days.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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none today wrote:

Paint scratches easy. Trick to having things slide is the smoothness factor. Scratched paint will increase friction. With constant polishing and waxing, paint should be okay. Powder coat is actually a type of plastic that is cooked onto whatever you are coating. High friction content. Plus there are no guarantees that you will end up with a level surface after the process. Plus, once you chip it in one spot, it will keep coming up!
With chrome or nickel plating, you will want to specify that you don't want your surface polished. No guarantees that the guy holding your table to the buffer wheel will keep it a flat surface, so specify no polish. Just plate. Low upkeep with chrome. Nickel will require some polishing, occasionally.
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none today wrote:

If you paint it be sure to use the red or gray primer.
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Unless you have it powder coated the paint will probably rub off on to the wood you are cutting. I had an old insert that left red paint on my wood until all the paint rubbed off. Use the Empire product to restore the finish and then apply 2 or 3 initial coats of TopCote. I live in Houston and the humidity is regularly 80% and above and I have no rust problems using TopCote and I apply it about every 3 or 4 months. If you have condensing moisture on your tools nothing will probably help short of spraying down with oil.

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