Paint questions

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Over the long weekend I primed the inside of the shop, two coats of PVA primer/sealer that had been tinted white.
This caused a stir at Lowes, apparently no one had ever requested the already white primer be tinted white, basically they humored me to get me out the door.
After two coats of primer (25 gallons) blocks are sealed and no color bleed through anywhere, something of an achievement when painting block walls.
Considering that I will most likely never paint the inside again, what would be the best topcoat? Oil base or water base? I am willing to spend the money for a quality, durable paint, but what brand and type does everyone like? Sometimes spending a lot of money doesn't guarantee a good product.
Considerations on applying in high humidity? Humidity is in the 90's and will remain so until mid-September.
Whatever brand, I want to stick with white and at least a semigloss, even considered a gloss or high gloss, but I have never seen that much wall done in a true gloss, would it be too much of a good thing?
Everything will be rolled and brushed
basilisk
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I am not a pro painter but do a lot of painting on my rentals. Once you hav e that primer in place you can use pretty much anything. I just primed out a freshly sheetrocked and textured walk in closet using Lowes PVA primer th is last weekend. I wish I had though to tint it because it looks great but is kind of grayish. I would have left it if it was white enough.
I would just use Valspar or Olympic laytex if you are buying from Lowes. Yo u could go to exterior if yo want it to be a bit tougher but it will stink inside until it gasses off all the ammonia or whatever that smell is. Also, semi-gloss is as much as you will want to go on a wall system. Gloss just doesn't hold up well on large areas for some reason in my experience. Also, with today's paints, you could go with egg-shell or satin and get just as much wash-ability if that is what you are going for.
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On Mon, 08 Jul 2013 09:39:02 -0700, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

cleaning is one reason the other is light reflection, I want and need it bright. I'll take your word for the durability issue on the gloss, I have no experience with gloss other than on trim.
basilisk
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-------------------------------------------------- "basilisk" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- White will come back to bite you.
Off white or egg-shell is your friend.
The yacht builders learned that a long time ago.
Both of the above will provide good reflectivity IMHO.
Lew
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On Mon, 8 Jul 2013 19:54:53 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Why will white come back to bite him?? On a yacht it is hard to keep the finish white due to algae, salt, and other contaminants - but you still see as many white as any onther colour - and perhaps as many as all other colours combined, depending on where you are.
Gloss white steel is used in a LOT of shop interiors.
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On 7/8/2013 10:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

FWIW I can buy "egg shell" in blue , red, black, orange etc. Egg shell is typically a degree of gloss. Flat, egg shell, satin, simi-gloss, gloss.

I would suspect an egg shell texture is less slippery when wet.

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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Yachts provide a very difficult challenge to the marine coatings industry.
Every one of them that I'm aware of offer at least three different "White" coatings.
The basic problem is UV damage.
Not only does the boat get hit with the direct rays of the sun but in addition, the sun's rays get reflected from the water so it is a double whammy.
The service life of a marine coating in the Caribbean are about half what thyey are in the Chesapeake Bay or the Great Lakes.
Since daylight is the culprit that we are dealing with any paint or coating, trying to maintain a pure white is the most difficult task.
Choosing an "Off White" not only allows for an extended service life since the daylight is trying to fade a color that is already not pure white, but is also more able to hide marks and smudges that will happen during service.
The whole process is a fight with mother nature.
Lew
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On Tue, 9 Jul 2013 17:41:37 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

I have zero knowledge on paint for marine purposes, but I would've thought that our current technological knowledge would be able to come up with a paint that is truly UV resistant.
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------- When they do, the painters will be out of business along with many of the support suppliers.
Lew
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On 7/9/13 9:27 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

So what? I don't see a lot of wagon wheel repairmen anymore. Or Horseshoers. 8-track manufactures seemed to move on to something else, too.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

------------------------------------------------- "Lew Hodgett" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- "-MIKE-"wrote:

------------------------------------------------------ The day a complete block of UV damage is obtained, will be a major milestone.
Skin cancer will be gone, the fading and resultant shortening of useful service life of almost everything from clothing to hard goods will have a rather dramatic effect on humanity in total.
We are not talking about the loss of a few items such as buggy whips or 8-tracks, but rather a major way we conduct our lives.
Lew
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On 7/9/13 11:28 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

And we'll adapt. How the hell did anyone survive before fire? Before they learned to make a spear from a sharpened stone? Before the bow and arrow? Before refrigeration? Before penicillin? Before the internet. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Tue, 9 Jul 2013 21:28:51 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

So, eliminating UV effects is a holy grail comparable to a usable superconductor?
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On Tue, 9 Jul 2013 19:27:39 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Many polyurethane paints ARE very UV resistant. Imron for one. Most urethane paints, even red, can be touched up even when 10 years old without resorting to blending or custom mixing to compensate for fading.

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---------------------------------------------------------- You will have to define "Very Resistant".
A little bit pregnant doesn't cut it.
You either do or don't block UV rays.
Lew
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There is some kind of color that is widely used in bathrooms in
Commercial structures where the surfaces are often prevented, I am not a painter but do a lot of painting on my rentals and farmhouses. , Beautiful paint indicate beautiful house.
--
Gammer0


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wrote:

When I did mine 30 years ago I used no tecture on the drywall. Had to work harder at taping and sanding but then after the primer I went with an off white enamel. I can still take a dust mop or damp mop to the walls for easy cleaning.
Mike M
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On Mon, 08 Jul 2013 09:39:02 -0700, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

The tinting really does help, even tinting white. PVA is thin enough to be difficult to brush cleanly, having it tinted seems to improve the flow, I have no explanation for this unless it is a property of the pigment vehicle.
basilisk
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wrote:

I'd stick with a latex on concrete because it can breath better than an alkyd. Alkyd modified 100% acrylic latex like MooreGlo should work over your PVA primer. Check with your B-M dealer to be sure.
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On 7/8/2013 8:57 AM, basilisk wrote:

I used Glidden latex simi satin. Not happy. When I lean a board on the wall the paint sticks and pulls away and leaves a small cut mark.
Perhaps it was Glidden, perhaps it is the relatively high humidity conditions.
Anyway Oil based paints tend to dry/cure better regardless of quality.
Latex cures harder with the better quality paints.
I would look for Sherwin Williams/Sears Easy Living Best
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