Paddle Stairs

For those who don't know what this is, it is a stairs used in places where there is not enough space for an ordinary staircase. The treads are shaped so that they alternate between being wider on the left then the right. I've heard of them being used in the UK but never in the US or Canada. Has anyone ever built or used one? I wonder what a building insector would think of them.
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On 05/20/2010 01:59 PM, Jimbo wrote:

I saw pictures of a more extreme version of this where there was a center stringer and stairs were completely missing on alternate sides. This lets you go with a much steeper stair but still get full depth treads.
Chris
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Put your architectural engineer's stamp on the drawings and when somebody kills themself you go to jail. That's all they want to pass them.
I saw pictures of a more extreme version of this where there was a center stringer and stairs were completely missing on alternate sides. This lets you go with a much steeper stair but still get full depth treads.
Chris
On 05/20/2010 01:59 PM, Jimbo wrote:

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On 5/20/2010 2:59 PM, Jimbo wrote:

I saw them all over the place in the British Isles, but I believe you will find that most building codes in North America classify "alternate step" stairs as "ladders" and only allow them in certain areas, like attic access, if at all.
That said, I wouldn't let that stop me if you're serious because these things are often negotiable with building service departments and you never know until you ask or make an issue of it. I would, however, want an engineer or architect to design them for plans submittal to stand a chance of getting approval.
Just a note of personal experience ... despite the fact that they are supposedly designed for same, these things are tough on forward descent, particularly on oldsters. AAMOF, I stayed in a Sheffield B&B a few years back and did not relish the idea visiting my daughter's room at my age because I knew I had to come back down them in a dimly lit stairwell ... and I used to do a lot of rock climbing. :)
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On 5/20/2010 4:48 PM, Swingman wrote:

DAG's found this you:
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/03/alternating-tread-stairs.php
Velly interesting if you want to see looking down some of these things looks like:
http://www.treehugger.com/leoniestair.jpg
Get vertigo just looking at it!!
Whatever route you take, I'd consider a timely paid, rather large liability policy on hand, at all times ...
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Would kind of preclude toting a queen-size mattress to the second floor, wouldn't it?
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said:

LOL, I was thinking the same thing... but then, if you need to save *that* much space in the house, you prob don't have room for a queen anyway! ;-)
jc
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The house that was just built across the street from me had stairs that wouldn't pass inspection so they walled them off until the building inspector left, then cut through the sheetrock. Nice.
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