Oxygen-free finish container idea


There have been a few threads recently about usign marbles or decanting to smaller containers to keep partially used containers of varnish from curing.
It seems to me that the best way to do this would be bladder-type arangement, not unlike an el-cheapo 5-liter box of wine, a plastic bag tha simply collapses as it is emptied. More specifically, how about using a baby bottle with the diposable liners.
I "acquired" my stepdaughter at age 5, so I do not have any hands-on experience. Would it be possible to swap out the nipple for some other type of spout. Heck, maybe the nipple would work fine as is.
What do you all think. is there any merit to the idea. Any new dad's out there willing to comment?
I have a brand new quart of Waterlox that I am hesitant to open.
-Steve
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Stephen M wrote:

Kinda like that maybe?
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=20052&cat=1,190,44133
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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Yeah, like that but with the ability to shrink to much less than 16 oz.
Stephen M wrote:

Kinda like that maybe?
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p 052&cat=1,190,44133
--
Will R.
Jewel Boxes and Wood Art
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Simply seal the can and turn it upside down, the oxygen goes to the bottom and the top side stays fresh.
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I like the baby bottle idea tho' mine are 25+ years beyond that stage.
I've been cogitating and plan to try a squirt of propane from my soldering torch (unlit!), sorta like the relatively expensive oxygen replacement gas bottle stuff. Propane (C3H8) has a specific gravity of about 1.5 and a molecular weight of 50. Air has an SG of 1.0 and gaseous oxygen a molecular weight of 32, so the heavier propane should displace a lot of air and almost all the associated oxygen.
Am I missing something here? Anyone tried it?
Regards.
Tom
"It so cold in Texas last winter that the lawyers had their hands in their own pockets."
On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 14:26:59 -0400, "Stephen M"

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Tom Banes wrote:

Works in theory...of course, the flammability goes <way> up and is primary potential problem.
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I had a friend who had the idea of keeping his finish in the collapasble plastic bladders a whild ago. The spout on the wind bladders works fine for dispensing what ever amount of finish that you need, and there is almost no oxygen in the container. robo hippy
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Check with United Plastics - betcha they have collapsable containers that would fit your needs. Personally, since I weld some, I have a tank of ARGON, and I just use the ARGON instead of the MUCH more expensive stuff like Bloxygen. Works great to prevent oxidation and I use it in all my contains of paint/varnish/shellack/etc
John
wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@interoz.com wrote:

Google "platypus water". JP

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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 15:42:47 -0500, Duane Bozarth

I've been using propane for the last couple of years with good results. Yes flammability is a problem but I consider it minimal since there's so little propane used and its not like a bunch of strangers are inspecting the insides of my containers with matches. The entire empty space in the container doesnt have to be filled since the propane is heaver and sinks to cover the surface of the material inside. I just stick the nozzle of the torch in the container and open it for about 3 seconds. The only downside is the stench from the gas.
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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 15:42:47 -0500, Duane Bozarth

I just checked a few resources
Flash Point (closed cup) of propane ~67 degress C Flash point of Naptha (closede cup) ~ 34 degrees C Flash point of mineral spirits (Grade IVA) ~48 degrees C Flash point of mineral spirits (grade IIC) ~ 61 degrees C
Propane is flammable, no doubt, but I suspect that most of us have one or two of the other common solvents hanging around the shop that are more so, in some cases a lot more so. Naptha, in particular, is a great degreaser, but it is VERY flammable and, indeed, explosive. I've lit too many campfires with Coleman fuel, losing eyebrows in the process, to like the stuff! In still, humid air and given a few seconds to disperse between the pour and the match lighting, you can be at the center of a "Flaming Inferno" that's quite impressive to a disinterested observer. Stinks of burnt hair on the inside tho'!
I'm not sure that a few CCs of propane in a close container has any appreciable effect on the local area flammability.
Regards.
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I've been using propane to displace air in cans for about 4 years now.
Works great.
djb
--
Life. Nature's way of keeping meat fresh. -- Dr. Who

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Tue, Aug 30, 2005, 2:26pm snipped-for-privacy@primelink1.net (StephenM) who doth aver: There have been a few threads recently about usign marbles or decanting to smaller containers to keep partially used containers of varnish from curing. <snip> Recently? Check the archives.
I just checked a post I had previously made, and this thread was next.
If you're just gonna be concerned with small amounts, I'd get a baby bottle or two and see how it works.
I usually don't use large amounts of anything, at one time. Usually. So, over time, I've determined that, for me at least, the least hassle, and most cost effective way, is to buy the smallest can of whatever that I know I will be able to use up before it hardens, spoils, whatever. If I need more than I'd figured on, I just get anolther small can. Yeah, probably it costs a bit more per unit - but it works, and, to me, is worth the lack of hassle.
JOAT Plans? Plans? Don' need no steenkin' plans.
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Sorry JT, to be frank, I generally skip past most of your initial posts because the inspirational stuff is not my cup of tea. I must have missed it.

I just may have to do that.

The thing is that I can't get specialty finishing supplies locally. I'm in it for shipping. I recently bought a quart of waterlox. Homestead was the cheapest I could find at 17.99 + $8 shipping. Maybe I'm just cheap but $26/quart seems pricey by just about any standard. It would be cheaper to buy fancy storage bottles that to purchase smaller containers.
-Steve
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Wed, Aug 31, 2005, 9:19am snipped-for-privacy@primelink1.net (StephenM) did apologize: Sorry JT, to be frank, I generally skip past most of your initial posts <snip> The thing is that I can't get specialty finishing supplies locally. I'm in it for shipping. I recently bought a quart of waterlox. Homestead was the cheapest I could find at 17.99 + $8 shipping. Maybe I'm just cheap but $26/quart seems pricey by just about any standard. It would be cheaper to buy fancy storage bottles that to purchase smaller containers.
No prob about skipping my posts. That's one of the privileges here.
Ouch. That sounds awful pricey. One thing, in a sealed, never opened, can I would think it would keep for quite a while. Might work to get a batch of smaller cans, all at once. I don't know if that would be less expensive or not, you'd have to work that out.
Long ago, at least once, I posted a link to a comparison of those type finishes. Waterlux was not rated number 1, or 2, or 3. I have no idea of the cost difference tho. So, you might want to shop around a bit. If I can track it down again, I'll post it again.
JOAT Plans? Plans? Don' need no steenkin' plans.
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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 14:26:59 -0400, the blithe spirit "Stephen M"

Probably not thick enough to prevent oxygen migration. Baby wouldn't like it much, either.

Might the solvents eat the bag or nipple? Best not take a chance. And the nipple wouldn't be secure enough to prevent airflow.

Here are 3 very good solutions: marbles to take up the slack, Bloxygen, or inert gas. Propane works and is not much more flammable than the solvents already -in- most finishes.
LJ--who lost half my second (quart) can the second time due to my own negligence. (The first I remembered to put Bloxygen in.)
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Some suggest camera outlet where collapsible containers are frequently used by shutterbugs.
On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 14:26:59 -0400, "Stephen M"

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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 14:26:59 -0400, "Stephen M"

For large amounts, the containers Lee Valley has should work fine. Since I do more hobby work than large scale woodworking, I store smaller amounts of my supplies in syringes. A medical supply place should have a giant range of sizes (Up to 60cc, though the 60s usually have too wide a tip to actually hold liquid in). You will probably want to ask for the non-Leur-Loc tips. Most of what I keep in them is waterbased varnish (Varathane), paints, and 2-part epoxy (Measuring in graduated syringes is far, far more accurate than using two different containers and pouring back and forth between them).
Oddly enough, I used a small one for a peanut-oil based prescription for dry skin - and the rubber tip on the syringe eventually came off the plunger. It could be that this particular syringe wasn't a good quality, however.
I don't know how well syringes would stand up to oil based or (other) solvent based paints.
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Tue, Aug 30, 2005, 2:26pm snipped-for-privacy@primelink1.net (StephenM) has queried: <snip> how about using a baby bottle with the diposable liners. <snip> I just remebered. Some time back, I had occassion to store some smaller amounts of latex paint, of various colore. So, I decided to try small plastic soda bottles. Worked great. However. There's always a however. Worked great while I was using very small amounts of the paint ever day or so. But, I went about a week without using any, and it dried on the threads. Kinda hard to uscrew the top. OK, no biggie. Then the paint set up some more, and had to use pliers to unscrew the top. OK, still nothing large. But then the tops got the the point where they wouldn't come off at all. Finally wound up cutting the bottle tops off.
Since then, I keep small portions of latex paint in some small containers, with snap on tops, I got in the grocery store. Got 5 or 6 in a pack, for just $1 or $2. The paint does have the tendency to thicken up a bit, over time, but just adding a bit of water and stirring takes care of that. The tops to tend to stick a bit, from paint drying on the edges, but no prob. When that happens, I just run a popsicle stick around the top, pops it loose, no prob. I use other containers, same type, to keep screws, nails, etc., in - clear plastic, you don't need labels of what's in it, just look. That is very handy.
I don't know if that would work for an oil base paint or not. The only oil base paine I use anymore bright yellow, I keep a small can of that in my shop, for painting tools - latex won't work for that.
JOAT Plans? Plans? Don' need no steenkin' plans.
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