Overuse of machine tools?

Page 3 of 4  
On 5/1/2013 6:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Location, Location I guess, Our 6 chairs were basically $1500 and a table was in the $1200 range. The Hutch was $2400 IIRC.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

leaves, which have never been taken out of storage inside the table), hutch, six chairs, king-sized bed, dresser, mirror), chest, and bench. All Mission style, in Cherry, with self/soft bottom-mount closers on all drawers. The hutch and dresser were custom (nonstandard configuration).
We've moved twice since, with one moving company leaving their "addition". :-(
Oh, included in that price was half of my Unisaw. I used a credit card to buy it that had a 5% cash back teaser bonus. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2013 6:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

No, people do not look at the back of the furniture. I do. If it looks like crap on the back it probably looks that way on the inside too. I want the inside of my furniture to look like it was built by some one that pays attention to details.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

My father always looked at the back of a man's shoes; if they were scuffed/not polished and the rest of the shoe looked good he figured that the guy was a corner cutter.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"dadiOH" wrote in message

Seems to me Peanuts' Linus only polished the front... didn't care what people thought as he walked away. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 May 2013 19:53:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I'd guess that the dark stain is used to hide blemishes or at the very least, the type of wood it is. Particle board with a dark stain is not nearly as obvious as it is with a lighter stain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Generally you get what you pay for. Even back when everything was hand-made only the wealthier families had the good stuff.
There is a wide range of quality antique furniture around, particularly chairs. I was offered 8 Larkin cane-seat chairs, circa 1908 vintage, like new condition for $1200 the other day; might take them up on the offer this weekend to go with the antique dining room table (quartersawn oak, 4' dia (11' long with all 6 installed leaves)), lions feet, mobile center leg I recently acquired.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 02 May 2013 13:44:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)

Unfortunately, there are exceptions due to age. I inherited my father's Emmert vise about twenty five years ago. Even then it was falling apart due to metal fatigue. I had it examined for possible repair and was told that the metal fatigue would continue until it was completely useless.
Agreed, it's not exactly the same thing as a wooden chair, but age and use eventually catches up with everything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sure they do but they're not willing to pay for it and it all ratchets down from there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2013 4:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

stores and as I have previously mentioned in two other responses an Amish furniture store is typically competitively priced with the even some of Ikea's higher end stuff.
The problem is that there is a much higher profit margin when you sell the crap so that is all that is offered in most instances. Do your homework and shop the suppliers and you will find good furniture at very competitive prices.
As an example, these are the chairs that I bought, I had my choice of wood and finish and I paid $250 each, $275 with arms. for furniture that is going to last a life time this is very inexpensive.
I am very reasonable with my pricing but would not want to compete with this store.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2013 7:19 PM, Leon wrote:
A link would help. ;~)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

*SOME* are. Most are quite happy with termite vomit and Nalga skins, if the choice is real $$.

Most are going to throw it away in a couple of years, or have kids or pets that will beat the crap out of it before then, anyway.

I think that's what I paid for these. Maybe a little more.
http://www.greenacresfurniture.com/catalog/content/zoom/?image=http://www.greenacresfurniture.com/catalog/images/products/McKinkley-Mission-Dining_700.jpg

Of course there's a wide variety of pricing on this stuff. My point is that people really don't care enough to educate themselves. They have more important things to do. They're probably right, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2013 8:19 PM, Leon wrote:

How's the SS ? You making lots of sawdust? When you mounted the WWII was the cut any better than on your Jet??
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll agree with that. Whether it's furniture, electronics or whatever, I always enjoy window shopping or browsing online just to see what's new or different out there.
And, that especially extends to when I'm looking to embark on a new woodworking project for myself. I like to look through a furniture or cabinet store to get ideas for building something and then I add my own design features to that item.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I'd almost bet that is true *IF* they can cut it off from a cryopak. Just for jollies, try asking for a flat bone sirloin sometime and see what response you get. Chances are they won't even know what it is. ____________________

No, much of it is because many people don't know about such things or - if they do - don't appreciate the difference. Same reason that many people will never eat in a fine restaurant.
Lots of flash, little substance.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Utter bullshit. You do know that cuts are quite regional.

They don't know because it doesn't matter to them.

Personal choice. Some have other things to spend money on. Why can't you accept that others don't value the same things you do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

What varies is the phony names that local often markets ascribe *TO* them but "flat bone sirloin" is/was a universal name all across the US. Same with T-bone...porterhouse...rib...round, and all other parts; all are/were standard. ________________

Perhaps it should. That way, when they chow down to or buy a luscious "ribeye" they would actually be *getting* ribeye instead of rib steak. _______________

I have zero problem with that; however, "choice" implies that someone has weighed the merits of two or more things and has based their decision on those merits as they apply to their need. That's what most people do NOT do.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also known as "Boneless Top Sirloin Steak" when the backbone is removed prior to retail sale. Something that can be found in pretty much every grocery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 02 May 2013 17:04:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Exactly my point, names of cuts and the cuts themselves change by region. Defining someone as a "butcher", or not, by knowing what one regional name for a cut of meat is absurd.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Lurndal wrote:

No, totally different thing. The bone in flat bone sirloin is from the hip. The large muscle after removing the backbone is the shell aka strip, NY, KC and, in France, entrecote.
There are/were/should be three primary sirloin cuts starting just aft of the porterhouse...
flat bone round bone wedge bone
The tenderness of the cuts is in the order listed.
Each has several muscles. The largest one is what is usually sold as top sirloin. The first two listed also have tenderloin, largest in the first.
Now, since a "top sirloin steak" can be from anywhere within the area and since tenderness varies considerably, it also follows that some top sirloins are nice, others are less so.
And that is why I miss bone-in meat...I like to know what I'm buying.
More info on other sirloin cuts and pix... http://www.steakperfection.com/cut/Sirloin.html
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.