oversize mailing box blues

Page 1 of 2  
I ordered 2 carbide cutters for a turning tool from Crafts Supply.. Each cutter is in a plastic box about an inch square and maybe 3/4" thick..
They came today in a 7" x 7" x 4" box, filled with inflatable bladders.. Seems like a padded envelope or MUCH smaller box would be cheaper to buy and cost less to mail, besides killing less trees..
I know.. picky, picky, picky... but I hate to see waste like this, especially from a place that ships thousands of packages a month..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"mac davis" wrote:

--------------------------------------
Standardization young man.
Minimizing the number of boxes reduces inventory needed, increases volume of a given size, thus reducing unit cost.
Standardization simplifies automation designs, thus reducing fixed as well as maintenance costs.
Standardization is the name of the game for those guys.
Many years ago was involved with a high speed sorting automation project for the Post Office.
It would have been a bear without standardization.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup. They might also have tried using padded envelopes or whatever for such parts and had enough failures that they decided to use boxes instead.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The solution is to buy more stuff and fill the box.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Being larger may make it harder for the USPS to loose... Over the past four years the number of items that haven't made it to me numbers well into the hundreds. The carrier brings something every day so they can obviously find me. The automation is sending my stuff off into the ether... never makes it to the regional distribution center. Bring back the mules... more reliable!
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 1:12 AM, mac davis wrote:

Funny ... same thing happened to me yesterday:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/box2box.jpg
The little DeWalt box (3/4x5x12) is a modern marvel of packing efficiency, floating in a box (14x18x7) that would hold a dozen plus of the little ones, and with more cardboard/paper than I recycle in a week.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Noticed that it's a T-square for a tracksaw. How do you like the tracksaw? The last woodworking show I went to, I specifically paid attention to dealers with Festool and DeWalt tracksaws. They both appeared to work quite well.
What I'm interested in most is the kind of cut you get when using the tracksaw on veneered plywood. The show I went to appeared to crosscut splinter free, but I couldn't get close enough to the demonstrations to closely inspect or actually feel the edges for smoothness. With a decent work table, would you say that the tracksaw could permanently replace a decent tablesaw?
Thanks Karl.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 8:34 AM, Upscale wrote:

Actually, I have a Festool FS75 plunge saw ... it just so happens that the DeWalt T-square fits the Festool guide rails, and would be cheaper than Festool, if Festool actually had one. :)
<Festool has an adjustable, 'angle gauge' for their guide rails, but not a dedicated 90 degree t-square, thus my ordering the DeWalt part>
The Festool FS75, or 55, plywood cut?
Out of the box, rivals a brand new Forrest WWII on my Unisaw, and with the little splinter guard installed on the top side, there is no discernable tearout on either side IME.
Whether either will replace a table saw?
While either Festool or DeWalt will do much of what a table saw will do for rips, less so than for crosscuts, particularly if you need "batch cut" precision, but with Festool's parallel guide system, you can do batch cuts ... with the proviso that by the time you buy all the ash and trash it takes, you've probably most of the way to paying for a good, used cabinet saw.
That said, for the average woodworker doing one off projects, out of a small shop, and with little room for a cabinet saw, I would say 'go for it!', as the current track saws come close enough, in both cut quality and precision to a table saw, to certainly do most jobs without compromise.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 9:00 AM, Swingman wrote:

I forgot to mention one important fact ... the number of top notch trim carpenters and cabinet makers in the building industry who have replaced their 'job site' table saws with Festool plunge saws, guide rails, and tables and accoutrement, is increasing by leaps and bounds due to the increased "precision and portability".
That should be good enough rationale to realistically consider one over a table saw, if it's one or the other.
Also, you will notice that Tommy Silva and crew are hot onto Festool plunge saws on TOH and ATOH.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, certainly a tracksaw is extremely convenient for the contractor going out to jobsites. I'd suggest that's its greatest benefit.
Guess I'd have to work with one for awhile before I might be able to say that it mostly could replace a tablesaw. Considering that my tablesaw experience is almost forty years worth, it would have to be one hell of an effective tool though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 9:26 AM, Upscale wrote:

Obviously if you have a table saw already it will never be a comfortable total transition, but now having extensive experience with both, I can safely say, without question, that the Festool plunge saw can "mostly" replace a table saw.
And one thing it does more quickly, safely, efficiently and accurately than ANY table saw made is non 90 degree/angled cuts in sheet goods and panels ... for some reason an increasing necessity with each project I do these past few years.
Also, it is damn nice to have options other than a table saw when dealing with the combination of age AND 4 x 8 sheets of plywood/mdf. ;)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote

Are you saying that houses aren't being built square any more? Say it ain't so! LOL

My honey says that I am not getting older. I am getting better. But if feels older to me.
Most of my adult life, I never shied away from lifting or carrying anything heavy. I grew up that way and always did it that way.
Not so much any more. And ANYTHING that can reduce the need to wrestle with large, unweildy and/or heavy objects is a good thing.
Remember, old age and cunning will win over youth and enthusiasm. Although I have always tried to work smart, a strong body allows you to get away with things. That strength factor/edge just isn't there any more. I understand completely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 12, 11:16am, "Lee Michaels"

Some of the newer solid surface products now come in 120" x 30" x 1.125". Formica InDepth being one of the more common ones. Nice in the sense that I don't have to have the edges built up, nice to be able to show the full thickness around a undermounted sink. But HEAVY! Close to 300 # per sheet. I CAN get one off the truck and onto the CNC, but even with 2 guys it is heavy stuff. To get one out of stock and onto the benches really is a 3-man job. Then to cut to manageable chunks, the track saw approach really shines.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 10:16 AM, Lee Michaels wrote:

LOL, I intimately know the feeling of having an 18 year old view point on getting something done, and a 67 year old body to get it done with! :)
And it kills my soul to _not_ grab one end of anything being moved within my view, and feel a nagging sense of guilt for not pitching in, like I am an old man or something.
I mean, who needs spinach when 375 mg of Naproxen can make you superman for another ten hours or so ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote

Does that stuff actually work for you?
I am one of those unfortunate bastards that has minimal effects from drugs. Particularly pain meds. It helps a little. But not that much. If it works for you, that is a good thing. I am always amazed when I find somebody who has a simple solution to a problem. Even Aleve.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 7:12 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

I'm like you, most thing don't work, but Naproxen does. Too damn bad the side effects will kill you. It figures ...

I've got a high pain threshold, so I use it sparingly, but DAMN, it sure is nice to be able to put a shop apron on just once in a while without crying ... :)
<Hey ... if we start talking about regularity, or stool consistency, get out the bullets and shoot this way, quick! :)>
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote

I remember things I used to do as a teenager. If I tried those things today, I would die. You got a few years on me. But the aging process is alive and well in me. And as smart as I used to be when doing physical things, I am even smarter today.

Eggs zactly. I know of what you speak.
I was always the problem solver when it came to moving things or getting things done. It just kills me to stand around and wait for a younger person to assist. Hey, I am smarter than them. Why do I need to wait on them?
<grumble, grumble, bitch, bitch>
It is enough to make you a curmudgeon. Now that I think of it, how many young curmudgeons are there out there? Damn. I had an original thought there. Not to worry, I will forget it by tomorrow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

When Swingman first got the Festool saw he and I tried it out. It is cool. Mostly quiet and very little dust with the Festool vac attached. As for it's best use I would not say that it would replace a TS, but both would be nice. The Festool saw really comes in handy when needing to cut up large panels. Certainly easier for one person to cut up a 3/4" sheet of plywood accurately than using a TS for the task. The TS would do a better job ac cutting small and short pieces.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/10 8:34 AM, Upscale wrote:

All I saw was the nice amp. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2010 11:56 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

That's my rehearsal rig ... although lately it's slowly getting to be a "bring what's easy to carry and let the sound guys do the rest" kind of lifestyle. :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.