Overhead TS guard progress


After finally decided my idea for a cheap overhead guard wasn't doing any good in my head, I spent a few hours working on it the last couple days.
The idea is pretty simple. Usually these type of guards are a metal frame with DC hose attached. My shop is in the basement so the ceiling is fairly low, so I figured I could drop down with a telescoping plywood box that would be both the structure and the DC duct in one.
http://www.krtwood.com/guard.html
It's a bit small as far as a DC duct goes, down to 2" square inside the smaller box. But, my TS has a 2.5" hookup under the blade and I figure when we actually put in dust collection I can split a 4" to both. Of course, I've as yet to figure out how you're supposed to get a hose to the bottom of the TS without tripping over it. Anyway, the boxes could be larger, or you could run a separate duct on the outside.
The construction is rabbets on 1/2" baltic birch ply, glued and screwed. I made my own T slot on the inner box by running a groove down the center and then a shallower widder groove, then gluing in strips on both sides.
I was expecting to have to use some diagonal bracing, but the pocket screws, all 8 of em, are enough to keep the upper section totally rigid.
There is some movement of the bottom section when fully extended, about 1/4" front to back, not much side to side. Little bit of assembly error I think. I have to bring it up all the way to the height in the first picture to remove the slop. An inch below that and all the slop is there, there and above it's gone. So something is off. There's about 8" of overlap between the sections at full extension. I think adding a second knob 5-6" above the first would take care of it.
I haven't gotten any Lexan for the actual guard yet, I wanted to make sure the rest was going to work first. Not bad for about $15 spent so far though.
-Leuf
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PennState sells a hood for a tablesaw guard. Seems like a good deal for $25.
http://www.pennstateind.com/store/tsguard-dh.html
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On 17 Jun 2006 05:46:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I saw this. What I'd like to do is have it in two halves, mounted with knobs into threaded inserts. That way I can easily take one side off for narrow rips and still have some protection.
I solved the problem with slop by gluing some veneer on the inside back of the upper section, about 6 inches long. I also moved the knob up about 4 inches and that's taken most of the movement out.
-Leuf
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Compare ideas with what I did.
go to http://www.anneldavis.com/bobandanne /
From the menu, select Projects/Tablesaw Blade Guard. Look at the picture that is labeled "locking the guard in position". I've been using this guard about 18 months.
Bob

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On Sat, 17 Jun 2006 20:44:55 -0400, "Bob"

Hey now, I knew I wasn't smart enough to think of that on my own! Must have seen yours so long ago I didn't remember it, but the concept has been lurking in the back of my head all along.
I like the counterweight system, I'm not sure I could make that work with having the duct going through the column though. I like the swivelling sides too, I will have to think about that some more.
-Leuf
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