Other uses for maple trees

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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

It isn't apparent at all, especially for deciduous trees, regardless of what any book states. I've been through two winters in Idaho where the temperature got down to -40 F or slighly lower. In neither case did I notice any particular failure of conifers (although I was only 11 years old the first time). In the second case, I was in Moscow, Idaho. It was estimated that about 50 percent of all the old hardwoods (say over 18 inches in diameter) died when the trunks simply split lengthwise. I would say that survival of deciduous trees is pretty iffy when the temperature gets that low.

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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

It takes an oak tree something like 50 years to get big enough to make lumber in a good and proper climate anyway, I'd expect. Maybe burr oak is a faster-than-average species.

That's because real trees obviously have better sense than *you* do. They realize that the Yukon is not a fit place to live. :)
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My Dad called and told me they took down the neighbors Silver Maple tree. I lived 20 years of my life being shaded by it, playing around it, and raking up her leaves. He said he couldn't believe the big son of b was solid all the way down. A few phone calls a few hours later and she was already firewood. They musta used a helluva saw to make firewood out of her.
She was at least one hundred feet tall and 8 feet around... Probably the largest oldest tree around. Now the whole neighborhood looks bare and bright. I didn't want much, just a couple hundred board feet. So much for "I made this dresser from Mr. Biers old maple tree".
SCREW MAPLE SYRUP, I WANT LUMBER!!!
Sorry guys, just venting...
ss
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Look around you, are there any maples growing? Just conifers? Maples won't grow anywhere. If you're above their tolerance the only way would be indoors. How bad do you want that tree. If you already have maples growing wild, use them, they quantity won't be as good as with sugar maples, but it'll still make syrup. Good luck, Dave in Fairfax
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On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 18:06:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com scribbled:

Coming to think of it, there's a Manitoba Maple (Box elder, Keith; "Acer negundo" for those who care) on the property I own downtown. I wonder if I should try tapping it in May when the sap starts running.
BTW, they make birch syrup in Alaska. Except they usually have to add fructose to it to get it to the right consistency as birch sap has a lot less sugar in it.
http://www.birchboy.com/syrups.html
http://www.alaskabirchsyrup.com /
Not as good as maple syrup, but will do in a pinch. Certainly better than the other commercial "table" or "pancake" syrups.
Luigi Who doesn't really need to do this as he still has about a dozen cans of real maple syrup brought to him by friends visiting from down east.
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Thanks for the links. I love birch beer and saspirilla instead of RB. I don't know if Elder can be tapped or not. You should look it up for toxicity before trying it. The birch syrup is an interesting thought, and a great excuse for waffles (hold more syrup than pancakes).
Dave in Fairfax
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 00:17:43 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

If you would like a wonderful recipe for yeast (rather than baking soda) leavened waffles, please let me know. They are really wonderful...
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Kenneth wrote:

I'll take it. (My email works...)
I absolutely *detest* waffles and pancakes, having spent too many summers working the pancake grill at McDonald's in my youth, but I make them from scratch for the rest of the family.
Yeast might change the character of the things enough that I could stomach them. Maybe. In any event, the family would probably love them.
(Actually, wow... Whatever happened to Sunday morning breakfasts? I haven't made pankcakes or waffles in ages. I used to be the official breakfast chef back when all four of us were actually here on Sunday mornings.)
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On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 23:49:47 -0500, Silvan

Howdy,
There might bring back Sunday morning breakfasts:
I have been making these for over thirty years. Got 'em originally from the Farm Journal IIRC.
You might want to divide the recipe as this makes perhaps a dozen large waffles...
Mix 1 quart milk, 3/4 TSP yeast, 1.5 TSP salt, 1.5 TSP sugar, 640g AP flour, 1.5 stick melted butter to form smooth batter.
Cover, and allow to ferment overnight at room temperature.
When ready to bake waffles add 3 beaten eggs and 3/4 TSP baking soda. Mix again.
That's it, and they are spectacular.
If you give them a try, please let me know what you think.
All the best,
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Kenneth wrote:

Thanks...
No telling when I might use it, but I printed it and stuck it in ye olde recipe box. Now I just need to work on getting all four of us together at the same time and place. :)
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Kenneth wrote:

I'm planning it for next Sunday, working Saturday AM. Got my cast iron griddle out and I'm seasoning it. Can't wait Dave in Fairfax
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 00:17:43 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com scribbled:

Box elder (AKA Manitoba Maple, ash-leaved maple) is a maple, not an elder, which can be toxic. Although elderberries are used in liqueurs: sambuca means elderberry in Italian.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Shoot then go for it. I'm going to take your word for the translation, the little Italian I learned from theh neighborhood kids can't be repeated here. %-) Dave in Fairfax
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wrote:

Howdy,
You may be off by an "a":
http://www.wordreference.com/it/translation.asp?enit=elderberry
apparently it is "sambuco."
HTH,
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 19:12:48 -0500, Kenneth

Typically, in Italian, the masculine ending in "o" ("i" in the plural) refers to the plant while the feminine ending in "a" ("e" in the plural) refers to the fruit.
There is one exception that I know of, "fico", fig, which is only used in the masculine in polite company. I will leave it to your imagination to determine what it means in the feminine (hint, it is feminine not only in the grammatical sense). Maybe sambuco is another exception. But it's not a wash-your-mouth-out-with-soap "bad" word.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Hehehe, man named "Kenneth" correcting "Luigi Zanasi" on use of Italian. Mamma Mia... I suppose you want me to believe that my grandmother (God rest her soul) was mispronouncing "Bizza" and "Sangwich" all those years?
-Chris
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On 18 Feb 2004 13:48:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com (Chris) wrote:

Hi Chris,
"Bizza" and "Sangwich" are correct...
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On 18 Feb 2004 13:48:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com (Chris) scribbled:

You mean it's not actually pronounced "sangwich"? :-) But I have corrected people's English, so it's par for the course.
http://groups.google.com/groups?q=g:thl3826885410d&dq=&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm=r0rab.561%24qK1.616500%40news2.news.adelphia.net
Kenneth is right, at least according to all the dictionaries I consulted.
Luigi Whose tird (superfluous "h" omitted) language is English.
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