OT: Wiring a shop

Hi all,
I've been lurking here for quite a while and posted once a long time ago and I need your help again.
I just expanded my shop (due to a large increase in tools - my parents split up after 30+ years and I got everything in Dad's shop) and I am redoing the wiring. I want to put 3 outlets and a light fixture in and from what I see on the net (I did a pretty good search) I should only hook in to the end-of-circuit outlet. The outlets will be for table saw / bandsaw / drill press and a small light (2 - 40w bulbs)above the drill press. None of the machines will ever be on at the same time - except for the drill press and small light.
What I want to do is run the main wire to a junction box and have the outlets come out of that.
O1---------| | O2---------J------------Main wire--- | O3---------| | Light
Hopefully you can understand my diagram. I'm using 14/2 wiring and all the tools are 110v. Thanks in advance.
Chris
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The following steps would be useful for you to follow:
1) Get a professional to do the work. 2) If you don't do (1), do some more studying.
14/2 isn't sufficient. Size the wire to the load and size its breaker appropriately. If you are extending a 20 ampere circuit, you must use minimum 12/2 and if you are sufficiently far from the breaker box, 10/2 would be appropriate.
You don't need a central junction box, daisy chain the outlets. The grounded connection must be continuous and may not be interrupted by the device - this means you cannot connect the upstream and downstream neutral conductors to the screw terminals on the side of the duplex receptacle, but rather you must connect the upstream and downstream neutrals together and pigtail to the device. You should also do this with the current carrying conductor. _DO NOT USE THE PUSH-IN CONNECTORS ON THE BACK OF THE DEVICE_.
A continuous load on a given circuit may not exceed 80% of the rated capacity of the circuit breaker/fuse, beware of this if you are extending an existing circuit.
The ampacity of the wire is dependent upon its length, enclosure and (to a lesser extent) ambient temperature.
and so forth.
(FWIW, you can probably do what you want with 12/2+G, but get professional advice _specific to your installation_).
scott     
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Geeze - don't tell him this. 10 guage wire is way too much for what he's doing. He can go around a large house with 12 guage and still suffer neglible voltage drop. I'd hate to see the poor guy fight with 10guage wire for no good reason.
--

-Mike-
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Chris, the first thing you need to do is study up on your electrical. Use 12/2+G at an absolute minimum. The thinner wire is not for what you are proposing. I would also recommend going with two circuits, but thats just me, I like to have my switches on a seperate circuit than my receptacles. You may also want to consider consulting a electrician in your area as it may be cheaper in the long run to have it done professionaly, or see if you know an electrician to do it on the side for you.
That being said, your diagram is ok, but I would run from the jbox to the receptacles and a seperate pull for the switch (see above comment) and add that one switch to an existing circuit if possible
Good Luck
Clif

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Chris, the reason Clif said this is that if the tool should overload the circuit and trip the breaker you won't be left in the dark as the light circuit will still be energized.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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Unless it is really tiny tablesaw and you never want to upgrade, a 14/2 (15a max) will not be adequate; as others have said.
You certainly need 12/2. Since the labor is a lot more expensive than the materials, I would run 12/3. That way you can get a second (multiwire circuit) for free if you ever need it. I ran a new 12/2 circuit last summer and regret it already.
And finally, the circuit you drew is probably legal, but it is rather unprofessional. Why not just run one after the other?
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Buy a wiring book from Home Depot.....I bought the Black and Decker book. I ran a feeder breaker from the main box to a subpanel in the garage. I have 3 dedicated 220v circuts and 1 110v circut. I am not an electrician but I studied the book, drew up some plans, paid my $50.00 to the city, had it inspected and I'm off. It wasn't quite that easy...Running wires can be a tough job.........I didn't direcly answer you question, but I hope It helped
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Thanks all, I did go and get a book from Rona (the equilavent of BORG in Quebec) and some 12/2+G. The existing main wire that I'm using is 14/2 - it comes directly from the circuit box and now I'm going to call an electrician and get him to run the 12/2 directly from the box.
Thanks again for the help.
Chris
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Repeat after me... "I'm using 12/2, I'm using 12/2, I'm using 12/2". Do that and your drawing is fine. You really don't need that junction box though. Just run the home run from your breaker to the first box and then off to the next... to the end.
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