OT - Views on Death (friend died today)

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On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 20:58:17 +0000, Pat Barber wrote:

I kind of miss the IBM 7074 with 32K oil warmed (50 gallons of oil) memory (36 bit words). Had to turn on the oil heater a day or two ahead of booting.
-Doug
--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples
then you and I will still each have one apple.
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On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 14:34:40 -0700, Doug Winterburn wrote:

Oops, 7094.

--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples
then you and I will still each have one apple.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

I never saw anyone quite as irritable as an IBM CE who had to replace a bad core doughnut on our 7094. They're little, and they're very slippery when covered with oil.
We all tiptoed around him until he was done :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

He had to rewire a single core into the stack? Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@charleston.net says...

Yep. This would have been in '65 or '66. I guess a whole new plane would have been too expensive.
BTW, the disk heads on a 7094 didn't automatically retract when power failed. I was warned when I hired on to stay out of the dark hall if the power failed, because the resident CE would be charging down it to manually crank out the disc heads :-).
--
There ARE no Iraqi WMDs!

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I've seen core memory and the TINY little donuts on it, is this what we're talking about? PDP/8 era is all I've seen.

Heh. Dozen years or so ago or so, I was the same person charging down the dark hallway during an outage, so I could switch off the now-crashed systems in my lab, so I could bring 'em up in something resembling the right order. That damn UPS caused more outages than if we hadn't had it. This was all modern stuff, though, sadly enough.
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says...

Uh-huh. First locate the right core and mark it. Then unstring the vertical, horizontal, and diagonal wires, thus freeing up a bunch of good cores. Toss the bad one, add a new one, and restring the whole #@$! mess :-).
IIRC, it took him about half a day sitting on a newspaper- covered computer room floor in white shirt and tie, sleeves rolled up and hands covered in oil :-).
--
There ARE no Iraqi WMDs!

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Ouch. I understand the H&V wires, but what is the diagonal one for?
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Sensing the status of the bit.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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You know, about 30 seconds after I posted the question, I realized that had to be it. Thanks, though, it's beautiful stuff to look at - but I'd hate to hand-anything with it.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

My last manager at IBM was the engineer who figured out how to automate weaving a core memory. Before that, core planes had been hand-wired. Whether by hand or by machine, I always thought of core weaving as requiring a certain amount of magic. (-:
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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No, I missed that one. Most of the stuff I knew about was NCR proprietary. I apprenticed on the NCR304 in 1960, IIRC had 40K memory of 60 bit words(10 characters), used Ampex tape drives with NO inter-record gap. Printer was a 200LPM drum using 340VDC for hammers, firing a charged capacitior through a thyratron.
--
Nahmie
The law of intelligent tinkering: save all the parts.
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In article <JdCJc.259840$Gx4.125021@bgtnsc04-

If you looked at the coding on those cards, they actually represented two rows of paper tape, 45 columns each.
And I also remember Univac had 90 column cards even earlier, but I don't recall the coding on those.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Kurta?
charlie b
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Wow! I thought I was the ony one that remember those stupid 96-column cards on those old System 3's. I almost was getting the hang of reading stupid little round holes when a new fangled CARDLESS Data Genera was rolled in.
Actually, I miss those days. I remember when the card reader on our S/3 was screwed and the IBM CE was in ti fix it. It was hot and he had his long-sleeved white shirt unbuttoned at the cuff and roled up. Things weren't going well and he was cursing and starting to press buttons and such very hard and very fast. His sleeve unrolled and got caught in the belts that pulled the cards through and ripped the entire sleeve and half the shirt right off of him.
Had to be one of the scariest and funniest thing I ever saw!
says...

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snipped-for-privacy@thesafety.net says...

Back in the days of "tabulating machines" ('56 or '57) I saw a CE get his tie caught in a card sorter. Wrapped it till his chin was resting on the top before it started slipping. We cut the tie off his neck. He'd flown for the Flying Tigers in WWII and said this scared him just about as bad :-).
--
There ARE no Iraqi WMDs!

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

We still had a shop full of them in 73 in Guantanamo, supposedly the last one in the Navy. Ran paper reports but the civil service supply types preferred the card decks. Lots of fun when they added 2 digits to stock numbers and we had to generate 50,000+ new cards. Joe
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Apologies Nahmie. I have been in the business since the early 60s and know about the round holes and the big computer company whose name is a three letter acronym, the first of which is a Roman numeral. I was and am being a smartass.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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<snippage of some really good thoughts>

In all regards, I agree with you, and share your feelings for the family and neighborhood.
We go when we're called. Not every one belives they had enough time to 'get it right'. I belive there's a plan for that...
Patriarch
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Wow. 36 is pretty young for a heart attack. I'm 36.
You wrote a beautiful epitaph, Charlie. I'm sorry you were in the position to do it.
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