OT: Video Camera Monopod for Permanent Installation

This topic is somewhat off topic for this group but I have gotten good answers from the wide experience of the group members before. Please indulge me. ;-)
My church has started a video ministry to record the services and play them on cable TV and the internet. From our first few weeks it is obvious we need to build platforms 2 or 3 feet off the floor at the back of the sanctuary so the people's heads walking up and down the asiles don't get in the way. The platforms have to be relatively large to hold a standard tripod. It seems to me the plaforms could be significantly smaller if a shock-mounted monopod could be built into the platforms. I have googled a lot but have not found anything. Can someone please suggest a solution and/or link?
Thanks.
-- Mark
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I asume that this is a stationary video mount. It is a static position that does not move? If so, It is just a matter of finding a manufacturer of "pole mount" video bases.
If it has to move around at all and/or be manipulated by humans, this is something completely different.
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Humans need to pan. Fewer than 5% of preachers just stand behind the pulpit. ;-) Some do cartwheels across to illustrate points. ;-)
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

If NYC is a convenient drive or train ride for you, go down to B&H Photo and talk to them about what you need to do (note--they are a block from Penn Station--the train is a very viable option). It would be worth while spending some time on their site as well.
The panning function is in the head, not the tripod, and the head can be mounted to just about anything that you can put a 1/4" bolt through. Note though that good fluid heads (if you're looking for a panning head for video that's the technical term and the keyword to plug into Google) aren't cheap.
The "right" way to do this so that you don't get the congregation's heads in the way and also don't block their view is to put the videographers in a booth at the rear of the church (if you have a balcony then shoot from there) and adjust the focal length as required. You can also use remotely controlled cameras with powered pan and tilt mounts if you need views inaccessible from that location.

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Why not build smaller shelves further up the wall and use mini tripods, or something like the Ram mount?
<http://www.ram-mount.com/camera_mount/camera_mounts.htm
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Thanks!
-- Mark
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simple solution. *don't* use a tripod/monopod at all. all you need is something to support a tilt/pan head to which the camera is then mounted.
any sort of a reasonably sized _wall-mounted_ angle bracket or shelf support will work admirably.
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On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 01:15:31 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

Depands on the size/weight of the camera(s) used.
Our church has three of the electronic-news-gathering size/style TV cameras (what you see on the shoulder of the on-location cameraman for your local TV news station - or the police reality shows). These include the shoulder mount, a video tape unit and a battery, so any camera can be used stand-alone for things such as taping interviews or a drama rehearsal when the full 3 camera setup isn't needed.
After trying numwerous arrangements over about 10 years of broadcasting the services, we've come up with the following configuration.
Camera 1 is mounted on a tall adjustable tripod that rests on the floor. The camera operator has a platform to stand on to reach the camera's controls.
Camera 2 is mounted on an 8-9 foot long piece of steel pipe that is welded to a steel plate which is bolted to the concrete floor. This is mounted in the center row of pews, about 2/3 of the way back from the front of the church. The operator stands on a platform that fits on a pew seat.
Camera 3 is on an adjustable tripod in the left front corner of the balcony. No one can walk in front of it, so the tripod is set low and the operator sits on a stool to reduce his profile.
If you want pictures or actual measurements, send email to ads the obvious wizardanswers.com Replace "the obvious" ;-)
John
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