OT - Use grate in Rumford fireplace...?

Howdy,
The subject line says most of it...
Is it wise to use a conventional fireplace grate in a well designed Rumford fireplace?
Thanks for any thoughts,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How else to get air under the fire? It'll smother itself much faster without it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 16:19:53 -0500, "George"

Hello again,
Here's why I posted the question:
I had been using the fireplace with a grate that was of the wrong shape: It was too deep, and not wide enough. That is, it was not even close to the shape of the hearth of our Rumford fireplace.
I then thought that surely someone made a grate that would be a "better fit."
As I started to search the web, I found something that really took me by surprise. I came upon a few articles suggesting that Rumford fireplaces would burn better, and would also radiate more heat to the room if the fire were built right on the hearth rather than on a grate. These suggestions certainly did not fit with my intuition (for reasons similar to your comment), but I am happy to learn.
Hours later, after my fire burned down, I gave it a try. I removed the grate, and build a fire...
To my surprise, with no grate, the fire produced better draw, and burned the fuel much more completely. With the grate, there were always a few chunks of wood that fell through where they remained unburned. Without the grate, I was left only with fine ash. (I cannot be sure about the radiated heat.)
I will continue to experiment, but for now, despite my original intuition, I believe that there are significant advantages to burning in a Rumford fireplace with no grate at all.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nothing new in that , really. Any fireplace or stove lights better with air, which gets the chimney drawing, is self-banking with an ash bed.
Now, what're you after? Ambiance favors an open grate and the crackling fire, efficiency a banked fire (once the chimney's warm), which is why we have "airtight" stoves.
You can create a "grate" of wood to help light, and burn on the hearth, or you can buy a minimum-gap grate which will hold created ash to bank the fire, and scoop the ash out from underneath for lighting.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 07:53:44 -0500, "George"

Huh...?
Earlier (in responded to my asking if I could use my fireplace without a grate) you said:
"How else to get air under the fire? It'll smother itself much faster without it."
I responded because I agreed with you about that, and, as it turns out, we were both wrong...
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 13:42:18 -0500, Kenneth

Maybe I'm missing some terminology here ?
Why should the type of grate make any difference to a Rumford ? Rumford's rules specify the design of the smokebox, particularly its narrow depth and the use of a shelf. It's not a specific sort of grate.
Although that said, I'm assuming you mean a grate that's open, rather than a more modern closed smokeless fuel stove, or a metal box woodburner with baffles. -- Klein bottle for rent. Apply within.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.