OT-tile backsplash sealing opinions


So next step in the Kitchen remodel is to tile a backsplash.
Solid Surface countertop fabricated and installed. Went well, gap in the back to the wall is flush most places to a maximum of 1/16" in a few, and there is no SS backsplash coved or otherwise. Plan is to tile a backsplash wall from the counter top to the bottom of the top cabinets/windows/ vent hood. Tiles will be 3/8" proud of the wall.
Plan to leave a 3/16" gap between the tile and countertop and use a color matched (to the grout) sanded caulk at that point. Using MAPEI grout and keracaulk which is an acrylic caulk.
Would there be an advantage to precaulking the wall/SS joint with a silicone before the start of tiling to get an additional water protection seal or would this be an uneeded step or possibly a negative.
Frank
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Unless you have a habit of letting water pond on your countertops there's really no advantage to double caulking at the counter/ backsplash joint. Make sure the caulking depth is less than the caulking height (don't fill the joint depth) or the caulk will try to pull away from the counter and splash.
I had to read your post a couple of times - every time I ran across SS I had to go back and see where I'd missed your mention of Stainless Steel. Old habits. In this instance I'd use the term Corian (or approved equal) and rest comfortably that the trademark police wouldn't prosecute. ;)
R
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On Wed, 12 Dec 2007 06:00:02 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

Thanks for the opinion; sorry for the confusion. I expect that only the good people at Dupont would be offended.
As an old welder, my first trade, I did make a feeble attempt to convice wife that a nice, practical, commercial looking, stainless steel kitchen would be a good choice. I envisioned stainless steel counters with inset, removable, wooden cutting surfaces interspaced. My vision was not shared. Probably OK, not sure we are long term here, not sure of the unviversal appeal of my vision.
Frank

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I don't grout between tile and other materials or where you turn corners like in the corner of a shower. I would install the tile on the wall and grout between the tiles. Then when all is done run a bead of caulk along the joint between the counter and the tiled wall.
Grout at the intersection of the backsplash and counter is bound to fail.
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silicone at the edge of the SS won't hurt and will provide a backup in case the grout/caulk fails. however, that backup is only as good as the sealer on the wall- water goes right through drywall. if the drywall has a good coat of paint that'll help.
best thing is to do a good application of the caulk in the first place, then keep it maintained. water leaks into your cabinetry tends to make a mess....
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote:

SFWIW, got tired of having to regrout tile and ripped out tile back splash in a kitchen.
Replaced it with 1/4" solid surface material which makes a very nice back splash and totally gets rid of the grout maintenance.
YMMV.
BTW, if you do install tile, forget grout at the tile/counter top joint, use something like 3M 5200.
Lew
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Why would someone have to keep regrouting? If the tile installation is sound, and a modified grout was used, it should last decades.

Great stuff, just takes a long time to cure - figure a week.
R
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