OT: They're back

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The Great Southern Brood (Cicadas) is in full hatch and the woods are literally roaring at 100+db. They will keep up their song in the daylight hours for 3-4 weeks and then be gone for 13 years.
This is the third hatching that I remember and the largest so far, may we all be around to hear three more.
basilisk
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Sound incredible. The 13 year cycle is interesting. Not that many birds do that.
I remember my youth near a swamp/pond/wetlands when the bullfrogs would roar all night long. One frog doesn't make that much noise. But multiply it by a thousand or so, the noise levels get right up there.
Now are things going in your neck of the woods after the recent storm activity?
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in message

Oops, I screwed up. You were talking about insects, not birds. My wife watches nature shows all the time and I just assumed they were birds. She has watched several bird shows in the last week. And three volcano shows. She is a total geology and nature fan.

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On Fri, 13 May 2011 11:20:26 -0400, Lee Michaels wrote:

without increasing the death toll only slightly. A lot of cleanup has been accomplished, not any rebuilding yet but it will happen soon. It seems that every able bodied person in the state has contributed in some way to the relief of those affected, a local radio station chain pretty much turned over the airwaves to connecting the haves with the have nots, it is the way America is supposed to work.

I've seen every nature show available to mankind.
The Cicadas annoy a lot of people, but they are music to my ears, reminds one of the drones on a bagpipe. The birds love em, the first few billion out of the ground probably get eaten.
basilisk
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in message

LM:
There's an informed volcano girl on sci.geology. There is also a large contingent of trolls whom make the group pleasant, if sometimes unfortunately sparse, reading once they are blocked.. But your wife might enjoy the highlights.
If your wife has not seen the Scablands presentation that PBS did, get her a copy; quite the intelligible and dramatic presentation. As always without first-hand observation, there's room for some difference in explanation but the effort was very workmanlike by my conception.
Perhaps there's an audio of your cicadian chorus on the web. I've found fossils in the California asphalt deposits but they didn't talk back much. A few summer stays around Bloomington introduced my ears to the tidal play of crickets. If that pales against the surging of your current performers, it must be something.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Edward Hennessey wrote:

IU? If so, did you know Tom Perry?
--

dadiOH
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DO:
I would guess the pleasure was denied me. My visits stretched a week at a time over 3 years using IU as a convention center. For a person used to humidity being close as the ocean, the difference in atmospheres was memorable, including the nights of cricket a capella.
The only other mass encounter to mention with the bugs was in the vast basin off of the transverse San Emigdio range in California where we felt a days-long rush of cricket hordes. The snap-crackle-pop sound from necessarily driving over them was neither music nor advertisement to the ears.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Edward Hennessey wrote:

Shame, he was a professor of Paleontology but that was long ago. Come to think of it, a *VERY* long time ago.
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On Fri, 13 May 2011 11:16:46 -0400, Lee Michaels wrote:

Now that I live in the northwest the two things I miss from Louisville are the bullfrogs and the lightning bugs :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I've seem fireflies in the mid Willamette Valley. Not the hordes we had in NW Ohio, but at least some. Salem has red squirrels, which are common east of the Mississippi, but not so common out here.
I don't miss that one damn cricket in the basement that would start up just as you were drifting off to sleep ...
--
"I'm the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo ..."


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"Lobby Dosser" wrote

Are they still around up there, or have they been wiped out due to pollution/insecticides?

I have been know to have a chirping cricket in the house wake me, which caused me to get up, locate the cricket, find a pry bar and hammer, and remove the piece of baseboard he was hiding behind.
-- Jim in NC
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I'll have to ask my son, he lives down the valley. I haven't seen any around Portland.

By the time I'd find and kill it, I'd be so wired I'd just stay up ...
--
"I'm the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo ..."


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basilisk wrote:

I always enjoy the cicadas, be they 7, 13 or 17 year ones. To me, they epitomize summer. I also feel sorry for them, singing away about their own death...just imagine, all that time in the ground and such a short time to enjoy renewing their cycle of life.
Las cigarras cantan de sus propios muertos...
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"basilisk" wrote:

------------------------------------ Interesting, where I grew up they are on a 17 year cycle.
The first year, living in a house my parents built in the middle of a woods, was introduced to the 17 year Cicadas, my parents called them locusts.
That was 1948.
Lew
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On Fri, 13 May 2011 13:04:13 -0700, Lew Hodgett wrote:

We have those as well, it just that these particular ones are 13 yr.
They are a smaller bug than the 17 yr.
basilisk
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Different species. The ones called "periodic cicadas" are either 13 year broods or 17 year broods, with neither overlapping.
The every-summer cicadas are actually 3 year cicadas, but there are 3 broods overlapping.

I hate that usage, but gave up the argument years ago. My first exposure was the first full summer in Virginia (having moved in the previous August). I was 12 and they freaked me out. Something about the bulging red eyes.
Now I like them, though we are just outside (~10-20 miles) of the brood range for this end of Ohio. We had our emergence a few years ago. The annual ones are the song of the summer.
--
Drew Lawson | Broke my mind
| Had no spare
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writes:

Got to wonder how those cycles evolved. Yeah, yeah, google ...
But it's be more interesting if someone here knows.
--
"I'm the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo ..."


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General thought is that it avoids preditors getting adapted to them. Cicadas aren't agile and they aren't stealthy. So it helps that nothing is used to eating them on a regular basis.
Now why those *specific* time spans, I have no clue.
And I'll correct myself. It seems the 13 and 17 year broods *are* the same species. Just different populations.
--
|Drew Lawson | If you're not part of the solution |
| | you're part of the precipitate. |
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wrote:

Because they're prime numbers. A predator that's around every year will catch them only every 13 (or 17) years; a predator that's around every other year will catch them only every 26 (or 34) years; a predator that's around every 3 years will catch them only every 39 (or 51) years; and so on. It makes it *much* more difficult for a predator to co-evolve a synchronous hatching period: suppose they appeared every 12 years instead of every 13 -- then they'd be vulnerable, potentially, to predators that hatched every 12, 6, 4, 3, 2, or 1 years.
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(Drew

Wow, that makes sense!
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