OT, T-Shirt Transfers.

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I remember when I was young, you could put a transfer on a T-shirt by printing from the computer onto Ordinary, bog standard paper. Then, you'd mix 2 things together, paint it onto the paper and iron onto the T-shirt. I can't for the life of me remember what the two things were....
I do know they were common household things, but my mind is blank.
Any one know?
Barry
www.woodworking.wizkids.co.uk
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When I was young, all TV's were in Black and White. I am not sure, "computer" was in my vocabulary.
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"Leon" wrote in message

When I was about 11 or 12 (1955 or so) my Dad, who was in graduate school at the time, brought home an analog computer to do computations for his thesis.
About as big as footlocker, it was the first one I ever saw, and the first time I ever heard the word applied to a machine.
I was familiar with the word because prior to that my Dad had been a "computer" (one of the math whizzes who slipped a slide rule all day) on a seismograph crew when I was younger.
I remember being real interested in seeing who this "analog" guy was that Dad was bringing home.
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Swingman wrote:
> I was familiar with the word because prior to that my Dad had been a > "computer" (one of the math whizzes who slipped a slide rule all day) on a > seismograph crew when I was younger.
I still have my log, log, deci-trig complete with leather case.
Still know how to use.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message

Although it's been years, most likely I could also. I used one exclusively all through HS/college, and then again in the Army.
Just about any decent FDC (Fire Direction Center) guy (mostly math majors and engineers during the draft years of the 60's)) could easily beat the "FADAC" (Field Artillery Digital Automatic Computer), aka "Freddie", hands down with a slide rule.
It wasn't even close.
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We still use rotary slide rules (E6B) today when flying small airplanes. It works so well, it's a waste to pay $70 for an electronic version.
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<<We still use rotary slide rules (E6B) today when flying small airplanes. It works so well, it's a waste to pay $70 for an electronic version.>>
Speak for yourself. ;-) I use an electronic E6B when I need something for FAA tests. In real life, I use an Excel spreadsheet for flight planning that calculates fuel burn and ground speed; I provide this spreadsheet to my students as well.
I hate the mechanical E6B.
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On 4 Nov 2006 15:48:44 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@boundvortex.com wrote:

DUATS and the freebie AOPA flight planner do that for me, I use Excel for W&B. I'm not at all a curmudgeon.

Our GPS has electronic E6B functions available, but I still use the whiz-wheel at times, and I grew up with computers. Mine is nice enough to list the formulas right on it, so it's a tad more intuitive to use. I think it's kind of fun nailing down actual winds aloft speeds, etc...
You could always use the metal parts to hunt game during an unscheduled remote layover, ala "Survivorman". You can't use a calculator to chop up a squirrel! <G>
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My first introduction was when my father started working for Coastal States gas Producing Co. in 1962. I was 7 or 8 when he took me down to the computer room with the floors that had removable tiles for cables. The computers filled the large A/C room and had those big spinning wheels like reel to reels. It was not too many years after that in the 60's that he showed me their rather crude but fast ink jet style printer.
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On Sat, 04 Nov 2006 18:03:22 GMT, "Leon"

When I was young I remember UHF being new. Some rich people had color a few years later. My Dad got one of those high tech calculators. A TI50 maybe. Heck it has been so long ago. One of those calculators with the red numbers he used for work as an engineer.
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I bought one of those 4 function TI calculators with the tiny red numbers in 1972. That calculator helped me fly through Physics in college. I recall the calculator costing me 30% more than my tuition that semester.
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in
I'm from the same era, and calculators were actually banned at NJIT (then known as NCE - Newark College of Engineering) because only the wealthier students could afford them, giving them an unfair advantage. Most classrooms were equipped with giant working models of slide rules, 6-8 feet long and mounted on a wheeled wooden frame, to demonstrate basic through complex calculations in math, physics, and chemistry.
B.
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"Buddy Matlosz" wrote in message

classrooms
IIRC, they were the forerunners of "product placement", as they were supplied by the manufacturers, complete with logo.
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Fall of 1973 I sent a month's salary on an HP pocket calculator - one of the earliest of HP's business lines. That thing lasted for 8 years or so, until graduate school. It may still be hanging around in a box somewhere in the attic. The one I bought in grad school, or it's replacement, is on the desk next to my computer now. It's still the fastest way to do first cut calculations on time and money flows. And they don't wear out, really.
Patriarch
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Patriarch said:

And as proof, here is the one I bought in high school with the hard earned money from repairing teacher's 8 track tape players.
http://webpages.charter.net/videodoctor/images/TI1250a.jpg
It currently lives in the shop, for when my brain is dead. It has out-lived many newer, fancier import models.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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Oh, I don't know... I've got a TI-92 (much newer, though a little rare) that has survived for many years. I got one of the prototypes in exchange for developing some educational software for it for one of my math professors, and it has recently been granted a new lease on life by becoming my wife's college calculator.
It's fancy, to be sure- the only calculator I've ever seen with drop-down menus, 3D graphing, CAD (a light version of it, anyhow), the ability to solve complex calculus equations and a full QWERTY keyboard. But it's built like a truck, and has a hard cover that clips over it. Could be it's not an import, but I don't see that sucker ever getting wrecked by anything short of a house fire or a bullet.
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Prometheus said:

I guess my reply was a bit vague. I didn't mean to imply that the newer TI models, import or otherwise, wouldn't last as long as the old basic TI calculator. I was speaking primarily of the Casio/RS/etc. import brands which became mainstream competitors.
Since computers were coming into vogue, I never bothered with buying any more calculators, especially since portability for field work or classes weren't a factor in my usage of a calculating device.

Sounds like an on-site engineers dream come true.
Both HP and TI seem to be able to make assorted plastic parts fit together with more durability and longevity than competitors - albeit for a price. ;-) Probably due to the intended market audience. (Which I am not a part of...)
Greg G.
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My last calculator purchase (TI-89 Titanium) was a computer... At least by definition. I'm very careful about mentioning that fact to my teachers, as I sometimes smell fear of powerful calculators.
*trim*

I'd have to say the school calculator environment (TI's market) is one of the most hostile that you'll ever have a device in. You've got lots of kids who have nothing better to do there than mess with and abuse things. Most TI calculators survive, but not all do.
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Ah yes. The Casios are kind of junky when you put them next to a TI. Same deal as the tool industry, I'd guess- they're almost 1/2 the price in a lot of cases, so they get sold. I'd wager TI owes a lot to the school system- most of which is still suggesting their products, and using them almost exclusively. My wife bought a cheap one, and then took mine after she realized that all of the buttons had different labels than the teacher's.

I've always had a strong attraction/repulsion to calculators. I like the built-in programming capabilities many of them have, but actually feel like using a calculator for simple math is too much of a crutch. Mine usually do duty as handheld units for collecting and interpreting SPC data, or less useful things like playing old side scrolling video games I putz around with programming from time to time.

Oh yeah- or even just a regular geek's. After the wife gets done with her math class, it's going back to work with me. I don't actually *need* it, it's just a useful toy for tracking SPC data that I'm not actually required to worry about. (The boss doesn't seem to think it's necessary, I just do it because I can.)

Most likely due to the target market, sure. The things have to hold up to teenagers dropping them in a bag with a half-dozen huge, heavy books with hard covers. If they couldn't take a beating, they'd be useless to a lot of kids.
Never saw the HPs, but like you, I'm not part of the target market anymore. Even if I head back to school one of these days, I can't imagine *outgrowing* the one I've got, even if I majored in advanced math or theoretical physics, which is pretty unlikely at my age. (I'm not really "old" by most anyone's standards, but it's been long enough that I imagine it'd be about as pleasant as a visit to the dentist trying to get my semi-rusty brain to work that way again.)
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On Sat, 04 Nov 2006 18:03:22 GMT, "Leon"

I had Colecovision!
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