OT: SSD drive prices have dropped drastically this week.

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On 6/4/2014 2:24 PM, Leon wrote:

Just looked, I've got about 10GB free, there's 20GB of data on it somewhere which includes a swap file. Win 7 pro, MS Office 2010 full, video and photo editing software, assorted browsers and a handful of other programs. 2 or so years old. Data is on a 2 TB which is filling up, video and images mostly.
Seems like most of what fills up a HD is crap, I clean it out every few months. MS will stuff a HD if you give it a chance. And so will free/cheap programs.
With that said, I wouldn't mind a bigger boot drive, but it all still fits and the i5 still flies.
I suppose if I did all my work on it, it would be stuffed, but the entertainment has switched to the tablet and the light weight stuff is on the laptop.
MS could learn a thing or two from Android, computing is trending smaller.

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pentapus

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On 6/5/2014 5:00 AM, pentapus wrote:

Deleted temp files and gained about 9GB, so I'm about 2/3 full. Not that I'd suggest buying a 64 now. I remember running windows on a 20MB drive, 80 was big! Along the way windows has surely and steadily gotten to be a pig.
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On 6/5/2014 4:22 PM, pentapus wrote:

Well while Windows does use a lot of storage space, they all have gone that route. You don't see many main stream OS systems these days that can be stored on a 360k floppy anymore.
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On 6/5/2014 6:34 PM, Leon wrote:

True.
But I have an Android 4.2.2 which lives happily inside a few GB. The Raspberry PI is even smaller and the, I believe its Ubuntu, on Beagle Bone Black does fine in a few GB. All of them can run a browser and Open Office or something similar, and a photo editor. Most people don't need much more.
What amazes me are the Android apps. They download and install in seconds. How small is that?
Windows seemed to be more concerned with piracy and they built an obtuse code collection with a giant registry which is a near model for obfuscation.
I write software, mostly in PHP, and I can tell you that 360K of source code is enormous.
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"Leon" wrote:

Remember the days of 64K?
They knew how to write tight code.
Lew
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On 06/05/2014 08:53 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

multi-megapixel displays and photo and movie data and the software to process.
Modern data and its processing leads to larger software, memory and storage needs. Not to say that software inefficiencies haven't grown, but the hardware has improved faster than needed to outpace those inefficiencies.
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Doug Winterburn wrote:

Yeah, those were the days, huh? ; )

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I routinely run linux VM's with 8GB hard disks, and that leaves plenty of space to spare.
This is my domain email server (MX, DNS, IMAP server) for example:
$ df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/root 7.0G 2.1G 4.6G 32% / /dev/vda1 99M 20M 75M 21% /boot tmpfs 186M 0 186M 0% /dev/shm
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On 6/6/2014 9:03 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Still a lot larger than a 360k floppy. ;~)
But where does one get an 8Gig HD????
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wrote:

That's quite arguable. IMO, DOS was a file system and program loader. It was not an operating system at all. It didn't manage memory or do much else than an operating system does.

No, the NT variants (of which everything after Win2K is) are/were not based on DOS.

It's arguable whether Windows3x was an OS or not, too. You're right, all it did is slap a GUI on top of DOS. WinNT, Win2K, XP, and all, are a very different thing.
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On 6/6/2014 12:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Now I know. But Win 95 maybe 98 too and all versions up to that point loaded after DOS.

Somewhere around 1990`1992 I ordered a new Gateway computer with Win 3.0. IIRC during boot up it asked if I wanted to load Windows or go to the c:/ prompt. I also recall that I could get out of Windows to run PCTools, a very good utility and back up program. At the C:/ prompt I could load PCTools and literally back up every thing on the HD. When done I could reload Windows. If I tried to do a back up with PCTools while in Windows the program would ask to exit Windows.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz writes:

Windows NT 3.51 predated Win2K, and Win2K itself was based on the NT4.0 source base which I was working with at the time (circa 1998/1999).
Both were based on Dave Cutlers new (vms-like) operating system.
I believe 98 & /ME were the last DOS-based releases.
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On Fri, 06 Jun 2014 18:58:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Thanks for the history lesson but did you have a point.

I just said that.
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wrote:

The (in)famous "DeathStars". The IBM drives before those and after were quite good. Pretty much all of the innovation in disk drives came from IBM. Yes, they even lost the recipe for a while in the '90s. There was no money to be made, anymore, so sold the whole deal off to Hitachi.

They've had troubles, through the years, too. No one is immune when margins are that thin and the technology changing that fast.
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wrote:

Right. Win95, 98, and ME were all shells on top of DOS (though to varying degrees). All of the NT varieties (NTx.xx, Win2K, XP, Vista, 7, and 8) are quite different animals.

(Win95 etc.) still had DOS in there but more and more for legacy reasons. That all went away with Win2K, which was really NT (that really worked ;-). (Just to be clear, NT was *not* DOS based, either)

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wrote:

You are absolutely correct. Cost is the be-all and end-all. Writing tight code is hard and even harder to verify. That's why techniques like "object oriented programming" are used extensively.
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On 6/7/2014 11:25 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

In my world, performance is the biggest issue. Generally it is not thought about and ignored, until its too late. Then they go back and have to figure out how to make it run faster, which means identifying the bottle necks and then re-reading their code. And making changes, testing, pushing to production... (costly)
That's more expensive. When you do it right the first time you are thinking about it all the time. You do it because you know it will be an issue later.
I interviewed the other day for a small company, my first in many years. They are at this place now. That's why they need someone like me. As we were discussing things, I realized they never thought about perf at all. So their small customers are OK, now they are in big places, and it's failing to keep up... When I heard some of the things they did, they never made it scalable, and they never considered performance. I can already tell much of the things they want me to do, will be pushed back to them to make changes. They won't like that, but I can't solve their problems with a magic bullet, I have to educate them to do it on their own. I do this so many times after the fact... its cheaper to teach them how to code for performance and get it done when they write their code to begin with.
B4 the breakup of the bell companies, they identified some simple problems in IBM's logic.. they were doing the most common logical in reverse order. The most frequent case was being tested second, the least common first. Bell identified the problem and presented it to IBM. They made the change, and now the system was flying. Logical tests matter as far as order. The lower in the code o/s the more important. Certainly it doesn't matter if the code is rarely exercised. But if it is....
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Leon wrote:

Mike Marlow wrote:

Leon wrote:

Mike Marlow wrote:

Leon wrote:

I know I'm a Neanderthal but I still run programs that were designed to operate on DOS-2.0 and haven't been updatede since 1990.
Have my bank programs set up as database programs, some of which go back to the early 80's and are less than 70K.
Biggest PITA is to remember to use <ALT><ENTER> to get into full screen mode.
My customer file is a custom database file the contains 1,000 records with 50 fields and is only 200K.
I'd call that pretty tight code. What do you call it?
Lew
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On Sat, 7 Jun 2014 17:28:30 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

I call it bullshit. What sort of customer record is 4 bytes long? His initials + age? LOL!
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

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