OT: Southern weather

Page 2 of 3  
wrote:

years occurrence is a different story - and the mayor KNEW they had more than they could handle so called in the military.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All the years we lived in Jamestown, NY area, always got where I "had to" go, with no 4WD, rarely chains. Good mud/snow treads & extra weight in the trunk. My main "problem" is 4WD idiots. They think they're bulletproof. I've also seen people with 2WD and experience walk right artound 4WD who didn't know how to drive. SWMBO says for me to stay home here in TX with our 1 1/2" of snow. She's not worried about me getting wherever & back, just what some other idiot will do. Filled backup 30lb. bottle for the trailer on Fri. and we're just staying cozy. Propane staytion is only about 1/4mi. from us, we've got enough groceries unless it decides to stick around a couple more days, so we're good.
Speaking of cinders, Jamestown used cinders for many years until they upgraded coal electric plant so now all they have is "fly ash", which is totally useless.
Norm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My late father-in-law was one wild guy. Once, in southern Louisiana, he had to come back from working offshore, driving from Venice, Louisiana to Lafayette, Louisiana after things were seriously iced up. In Baton Rouge, as well as along the way, there are high arching bridges in the Interstate. He would just get a run at them, then at the top, put it into reverse, and apply a little gas to spin the tires backwards and keep in a straight line.
There are a lot of things one can do in bad weather, but some of them do not occur to most folks.
My late father-in-law was a legend on doing things outside the envelope.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

He was lucky. The surest way to spin is to break _rear_ traction, which is "put it in reverse" does.

How did he become "late"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

He died in his sleep, not kicking and screaming like the passengers in his car.
No, he just wore out. He died of old age complications.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just LOVE those people with their new AWD or 4WD vehicles just zooming along in the snow. Yes, better traction and acceleration than everybody else...but the idiots do not seem to know that they have no advantage when it comes to stopping.
For my kids? No SkidSkool, no keys. The full program.
All that sand and salt is murder on the infrastructure. It is not just the cars that get damaged. If you have to, a little sand.... and SLOW DOWN!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

Ayup. It seems that it's usually the 4x4's that end up up-side-down in the ditch.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I would tell my wife, "I have a four wheel drive, so I can go anywhere. It's an off-road truck so I can even go off the road." It took here a while to understand what I was saying. ;-)
I took her to work today. They only delayed until 11:00AM. She was pissed that they didn't cancel altogether, but there really wasn't any reason. While there is some ice hanging from the trees and on the grass, the roads are just wet (typical of snowfalls here).

There is a lot more damage if they don't use it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/11 9:18 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Hopefully this isn't picking nits, but AWD and 4x4 do help you slow down... assuming you already know how to drive in snow.
Those of us who learned to drive in snow (literally, like when they used to require drivers' education to get a license) were taught to down shift to slow down to keep the wheels from locking up... even with an automatic trans. If you have engine power going to all wheels, then engine braking is also applied to those wheels and it does help. It helps with braking and with fishtailing.
Of course, we were also taught those other safe snow driving habits like, going slower and leaving more room between cars. And of course, ice is ice and renders all knowledge and skill useless. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In VT they use pure salt until it gets too cold for even that to work. Then they use nothing and drive on the snow. That only happened a couple of times in the 15 years I lived there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Different snow?....buloney! The pavement is warm under the first snow and makes it a bit icy underneath...the worst combination of surprise.
It's the skill of the driver and the sharpness of the snow lug (I know. "what the heck is a snow lug?" on the tires that are the key factors in snow driving. Salt isn't used in sme parts and doesn't work in much of the colder winter weather.
Here you put on a decent tire, one that won't perform on a drag race track, a new set on the front, every year, and you are fine with a little practice. Oh yeah, you have to not be drinking Jim Beam as you drive, either.
wrote in messageWhen I lived in VT they didn't use *any* sand (it tends to freeze solid). When it gets really cold salt doesn't work, either. Packed snow is easy to drive on, though. Forget ice, no matter where you live.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/11 9:16 AM, Josepi wrote:

"Buloney?" I guess you'd have a good nose for it, huh?
There are, indeed, different types of snow. The soft, packed stuff to which he referred is easy to drive on and has as good or better traction than many gravel roads.
The pavement isn't "warm" in the middle of the night, in the middle of winter. If it snows in the middle of the day when the sun has warmed up the pavement, or early in the season when the ground temperature is still high, yes, ice can form underneath. But after a few weeks of continued cold weather, the ground is as cold as the air. That's why one has to dig foundation footings below the "frost line" in the north.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

Also, particularly the farther south one is, the more likely that the ground is yet warm even though air temperatures drop when it does snow. Consequently, rather than the fallen snow staying snow as it does in cold climates and therefore actually providing decent traction when packed, the combination of relatively warm ground/roads and weight of the first vehicles over it causes it to melt and then it becomes the icy layer even if there wasn't freezing rain/drizzle first. The snow itself isn't any different but the weather and resulting road conditions certainly are in general. Terrain as noted is a factor as well; much of those lake snow areas is essentially flat; it's hard to find a flat spot big enough for the cat in much of the southeast...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 08:59:07 -0600, dpb wrote:

Yep,
Last night we ended up getting about 3/4 inch of accumalated sleet, slick melting mess, I made it into work without any issues but many didn't. It helps to be among the first on the roads before it really gets packed.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yep, sometimes a little more snow is better for the tire to bite into.
Yep,
Last night we ended up getting about 3/4 inch of accumalated sleet, slick melting mess, I made it into work without any issues but many didn't. It helps to be among the first on the roads before it really gets packed.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Josepi wrote:

Only if it _STAYS_ snow...
It's somewhat of an anomaly but that the weather isn't as severe as that up north, it is that very thing that can make for far worse driving conditions. Compound that w/ the lack of removal equipment, etc., etc., etc., ... and it's not at all surprising it causes such havoc.
I've certainly seen more than any fair share of vehicles on sides of roads, in ditches, etc., in places like Detroit, Cleveland, Denver and environs as well as in VA and TN while lived there to know that there's no lack of problems in winter conditions irrespective of the blowhards who claim to have never been inconvenienced and can on their own mush over the Sierra Nevada... :)
At the moment we're getting a dusting out of the promised near-blizzard conditions two-day snow...a last little push as the system moves east; the sky is lightening noticeably so when this is the "wring out" as the drier air encroaches. Didn't need blizzard but surely could have used some real moisture on the winter wheat that's in very poor condition...this won't amount to a tenth of an inch in moisture when all's said and done... :(
Further N and E had decent accumulations I hear but as so often the case didn't make it far enough south west enough...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"dpb" wrote:

I'm reminded of 12/26/1989, the day I left Ohio headed for SoCal in a VW Rabbit, 4 cyl diesel with a 5 speed manual box.
Had built a plywood box on roof racks to carry as much as possible with me (Think the opening song/scene of the Beverly Hillbillies).
Drove west on US-30 about 30 miles then south on I-71 headed toward Columbus, Ohio and I-70 west toward St Louis.
Both I-71 & I-70 had very wide grassy medians.
Have never seen so many busses, 18 wheelers and cars in the median strip of an interstate in my life as that morning.
Spent most of the morning shifting back and forth between 3rd and 4th gear.
5th gear was out of the question.
It wasn't until some time west of Indianapolis that the weather broke, it stopped snowing, and the median started to clear.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't forget to "watch for ice on bridges". They do freeze faster than the ground. We were up in Atlanta Saturday, and there were reports of ice on the "Spaghetti Junction" (I-85 to I-285 junction, mostly spindly aerial ramps - way up there) ramps. I didn't see how, since it was well above freezing (lower 40s) and sunny. There were a lot of accidents around the city, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

down for almost a week. Never remember these problems when I was a kid living in NJ and getting tons of snow. Maybe it has something to do with folks not doing their jobs. Also remember living in Georgetown, Co. getting 30 inches a night, (not uncommon) and having to drive to the Ski area where I worked so we could get the parking lots cleared before the morning rush of skiers. Think everyone has turned to PUSSY'S
--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Besides the icy roads, our Louisiana idiots also try to drive with bald tires.... going for more beer, I suppose.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.