OT: Sort of Should I salvage my dryer motor

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I don't have any large power tools YET . My large pieces are a bench top table saw, drill press, scroll saw and router table but I do plan on expanding as soon as my money flow's with a bit more regularity. Here is my question. I have an old Kenmore dryer that is destined for the dump should I salvage and store the motor for future use ? If so what would it be useful for ? I know the question is a bit broad but I sure don't want to get rid of something I could use later. Puff Griffis
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Puff Griffis woke up and had the following words of wisdom ....:

Someone just posted pictures of a homemade lathe, that looked as if it had a used motor powering it. Just a thought.
--
Theres a little man in my head, saying things better left unsaid.

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My experience with dryer motors is: They don't have a complete case, there's often some exposure of the windings. They don't have a handy mounting base. They're specialized to being mounted in the dryer. You can work around this with a little ingenuity but... They are usually around 1/3 horsepower. You can find 1/3 horse motors a dime a dozen with a good case and mounting foot or at least a good case and you can weld a couple of angle irons to them for mounting. For sure, look inside your dryer and make sure what I'm saying is or isn't true in your case. If you've got one of those funky looking motors, it's not worth the time to try to make something useful out of it when you can get one ready to go for peanuts.
bob g.
JAW wrote:

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ranted:

I have a 1/4 hp motor on my little lathe. Works for me. A 1/3 hp dryer motor should be good for turning a mandrel and buffing or grinding pads/discs. Mount a drill chuck on it and use it as a horizontal mortising machine. Mount a faceplate on it and stick a PSA sandpaper disc on that and use it as a disc sander. Mount a flexible shaft to it and you've got an inexpensive Foredom replacement.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=2&page2960&category=1,43072,45939 Lots of uses.
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The last dryer motor I replaced had an open frame design, and special bearing mounts which resisted field repair.
Given the availability of reasonable small motors from other sources, I'd pass.
Patriarch, who's seem the inside of far too many large appliances lately...
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 06:05:32 GMT, patriarch

My tumble drier has just eaten its motor.
My bandsaw is underpowered.
I'm seriously considering switching the bandsaw motor into the drier, then buying a new and decently powerful motor for the bandsaw !
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wrote:

Well, Andy, based on your posts here, if anybody can do it, you can.
I get impatient, and tired of listening to everyone's questions as to when they can do laundry again. That's when life can get expensive.
Patriarch, who ordered an old handplane this morning as a consolation prize for the failed washing machine repair project.
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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 02:19:47 GMT, patriarch

Pah ! You didn't see what a farce the "simple" motor swap on the cabinet saw turned into. $30 for a damned magic pulley... 8-(
--
Smert' spamionam

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Alex
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yes - even worse. 30 - that's $55 or so.
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Crap man.. order from the USA and Canada. Cheaper prices though a higher for shipping, still cheaper. She should have gone with the Euro! But, God save her.
Alex
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I would go for it. I've got old furnace blower motors (1/4 - 1/3 HP) powering a wire brush wheel (used it the other day to clean epoxy off a bolt - took 60 seconds and worked like a charm, but use eye protection), a lathe (underpowered, but I can use it for an hour or so before it gets too hot and cuts out), a disk sander, and a cheap belt sander originally intended to be powered by a hand-held drill (the drill was annoyingly loud).
Most of the motors and lathe came from my father-in-law, who got them free from various sources. The belt sander came from by father-in-law as a flea market find. The wire wheel and disk sander parts were very cheap from the hardware store.
Anywho, the point is that if you don't salvage that motor you'll find something you need one for and have to wait to find a motor for it or shell out to buy one. Or you'll have to go "shopping" the night before trash day with a can of WD-40, a set of wrenches, screwdrivers, and a flashlight :o)
Shawn
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The point wasn't whether salvaged motors can prove useful. The discussion was whether a "dryer" motor would be had for a reasonable amount of effort as opposed to one with a conventional mounting foot, a suitable housing that protected it from outside contamination or whether one could find an alternative at an equivalent cost (free) that was more ready to go and suitable for direct application to the uses you and others have suggested.
bob g.
Shawn Wilson wrote:

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The point wasn't whether salvaged motors can prove useful. The discussion was whether a "dryer" motor would be had for a reasonable amount of effort as opposed to one with a conventional mounting foot, a suitable housing that protected it from outside contamination or whether one could find an alternative at an equivalent cost (free) that was more ready to go and suitable for direct application to the uses you and others have suggested.
bob g.
Shawn Wilson wrote:

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I don't have any large power tools YET . My large pieces are a bench top table saw, drill press, scroll saw and router table but I do plan on expanding as soon as my money flow's with a bit more regularity. Here is my question. I have an old Kenmore dryer that is destined for the dump should I salvage and store the motor for future use ? If so what would it be useful for ? I know the question is a bit broad but I sure don't want to get rid of something I could use later. Puff Griffis
My knowledge of dryer motors is small. Out of curiosity, what is the HP/speed of the motor?
todd
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You should certainly take a look at it. Motors are often handy - it can drive a polishing mop, honing wheel, wire brush etc. and this takes little more than a plywood base and a couple of "pigtail" adaptors on the shaft ends. It's unlikely to be powerful enough to drive large machinery, but you never know.
When stripping motors, make sure you collect any pulleys (both !), belts, mounting brackets, connectors, wiring looms, start capacitors etc.
I don't know about US driers, but washing machines are often _not_ a good source of motors. They tend to be open case designs, need a large open fan running next to them to stop overheating, and they can be electrically complicated to provide reversing or multiple speeds.
--
Smert' spamionam

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I don't have any large power tools YET . My large pieces are a bench top table saw, drill press, scroll saw and router table but I do plan on expanding as soon as my money flow's with a bit more regularity. Here is my question. I have an old Kenmore dryer that is destined for the dump should I salvage and store the motor for future use ? If so what would it be useful for ? I know the question is a bit broad but I sure don't want to get rid of something I could use later. Puff Griffis
There may be some uses for the motor but I doubt it would be strong enough for any practical wood working aplication. Maybe a small home made stationary disk sander.
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I don't have any large power tools YET . My large pieces are a bench top table saw, drill press, scroll saw and router table but I do plan on expanding as soon as my money flow's with a bit more regularity. Here is my question. I have an old Kenmore dryer that is destined for the dump should I salvage and store the motor for future use ? If so what would it be useful for ? I know the question is a bit broad but I sure don't want to get rid of something I could use later. Puff Griffis
I'm guessing it's likely a 1750 RPM, probably 1/4 or 1/2 HP. Good chance it's also a double ended shaft. Save it! Buy some arbor adapters that mount on motor shaft with set screws, makes a relatively servicable bench grinder. Make a 10" disc sander. Put a fan blade on it, mount it in a box with some furnace filters for a shop dust filter.
That's all I can come up with for now. Of course, there's always applications using belts . . .
--
Nahmie
The law of intelligent tinkering: save all the parts.
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It all depends on how much room you have to store junk. There is a remote possibility you will find a use for the motor.
Dick

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Sun, Oct 17, 2004, 12:24pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net (PuffGriffis) <snip> should I salvage and store the motor for future use ? Yes
If so what would it be useful for ? <snip>
Who knows, who cares? If it runs, save it, come up with a use later. Use it to weigh down glue ups. Swap it to someone. Sell it in a local bargain trader. Use it as a boat anchor. Take it apart, and use the wiring for something. Give it to someone who wants it, and gain points. Sell it in a pawn shop. Include it in a yard sale. Paint it and give it to your wife. Paint it, and give it to someone you don't like. Make a Rube Goldberg device, and use that to power it. Use it as a door stop.
JOAT Flush the Johns. - seen on a bumper sticker
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