OT:...sort of. Productivity in retirement.

Page 3 of 4  
Prometheus (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| On Mon, 18 Dec 2006 00:47:27 -0600, "Morris Dovey"
| || Prometheus (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said: || ||| On Sat, 16 Dec 2006 16:27:56 -0600, "Morris Dovey"
||| |||| Robatoy (in |||| snipped-for-privacy@t46g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) said: ||||
| || I think we /do/ need to move forward (be more efficient, improve || product quality, make customers more satisfied, etc.) Final || judgement on whether we're going in the right direction || necessarily comes after the fact. | | Too true, unfortunately. I guess my continual mental block is in | wondering if many of the things in modern life that are *new and | improved* are really good for us in as far as we are human beings. | To my mind, there are a lot of pitfalls in things like television | and mobile phones that have GPS trackers in them. All of that | stuff is relatively benign on the surface, even valuable- but add | it together, and those things that were supposed to make us all | more connected seem to act as a barrier to actual interaction with | the people right in front of us. Add to that the continual | improvements in the sophistication of advertising, and these new | things become more status symbols than products.
Well, yes we do need to examine these things for actual value. Much of what's new has about as much value as a Pet Rock. Much of the excitement generated is because we're being given a glimpse of possibilities; and there's a lot to be excited about - as well a lot to be wary of. I think we don't get to live out our last years rocking on the front porch - as 'elders' we have a certain responsibility to warn of dangers and give our blessings for purely positive developments - and perhaps to at least speak out on the expected and possible consequences of the rest.
| Sorry if that's a little disjointed- the dogs woke me up early | today, so I'm a little groggy. | || Choosing not to move forward is making the choice of stagnation and || irrevelence - both at the individual and enterprise levels. It || isn't that the old ways are so bad; but rather that sticking to || the old ways ensures that the old problems will always be with us. | | New ways mean that there are new problems, of course. The problem | seems to my mind that once we've all been led down one path, the | older method or product is discarded and forgotten- it's not so | much that I would want to turn the clock back, as I would love to | see some of those missed paths not taken explored, rather than | being dismissed as irrelevant. I suppose that might be why it | seems we're always re-inventing the wheel, especially on a long | timeline.
No, we can and do still cherish the best of the old - and we've all seen the evidence of that here on the wreck and on abpw. The question is really about how much resource can we dedicate to that effort. Consider earlier threads on old Chinese joinery and somewhat more recent dining table and dining chairs...
We have the opportunity to explore, within the constraints of available resources, paths not previously explored. After a long career as a computer geek, I've decided that I want to explore the practicalities of harvesting energy from the sun. IMO, that path has been under-explored and it's something that appears to hold considerable promise. Other people will (re)visit other paths.
Yes the wheel will be invented again and again; but so will we invent a means of repairing damaged nerve bundles and of instantly producing virus-specific immunizations and of ensuring that all babies are born healthy and without debilitating defects. I keep hoping that some genius would shout: "Eureeka! I have a topical cure for presbyopia," so I can stop wondering where I left my trifocals.
| It's neat that we can move technology along at such a blazing-fast | pace, but there is absolutely no way that we are learning all the | lessons that could have been gained from each new method or product.
The hurrier-I-go-the-behinder-I-get syndrome? Methinks this is what's sometimes called the "human condition". This is humanity's Catch-22. If we were smarter, then we /could/ extract those lessons; but if we were smarter, then technology would be moved just that much faster...
|| Moving forward calls for wisdom (application of our knowledge of || the consequences for the actions we take) and for courage || (determination to take actions that fit our best principles and || ideals even when those actions don't constitute the easiest, || cheapest, or most comfortable course. || || I think we criticize the MBA "bean counters" when, in fact, they || aren't the individuals who make decisions resulting in degradation || of tool quality. The bean counters do analysis, brainstorm || options, and report to company management. If that management then || fails to exercise wisdom and courage, the enterprise will not do || well; and neither will its employees nor its customers. | | Can't argue with any of that. I can't even really say that the | corporate structure as I understand it is failing- they are | producing and distributing mind-boggling quantities of product and | making huge sums of money, after all. I guess my gripe is that it | seems like every year, we're becoming less human and more consumer. | I guess part of that was being raised in a pretty isolated area | that was about thirty years behind the rest of the US, and getting | the crash course along with everyone else. I watched people that | used to get together and do things drop into shells made from | manufactured plastic and begin communicating from isolated personal | command centers and ignoring the people standing in front of them | in favor of the ones that were filtered through a speaker or a | screen. It broke a lot of families, and scattered a lot of friends.
Yup. (We don't always make good choices.) The real questions are whether we recognize that we could have made better choices; and where do we go from where we are...
| Then all the latest and greatest medications came to town, and those | same people who couldn't figure out why they felt like crap | discovered the joys of of chemical happiness with things like | Prozac and a variety of other things with oddball names that | changed their personalities even further. All of it happened way | too fast, and most of the people I meet today have a sort of sick | desperation about them. We're not in the business of solving | problems any more- just making more sophisiticated band-aids.
Hmm - /some/ of us are still in the business of /trying/ to solve problems. :-)
| We're getting pasteurized and homoginized, and while that might be | good for the big picture, where there are few sharp divisions left | and anyone can be just exactly the same as everyone else if they | choose, I still miss the cranky old guys that would sit in front of | the gas station and jaw all day, and the kids who actually used a | playground- instead of pretending to kill things on the television.
I dunno. I know of a place (right close by) where a bunch of cranky guys get together and gab (mostly about woodworking, but every now and then they'll let their guard down and talk about life outside the shop.)
| I know there's no easy answer to any of that- if there were, I'd | file it away and move on. Don't get me wrong, some technology I | like a whole lot (I am talking to you via a computer, after all) I | just wish there were a way to move forward without forgetting all | the past that lies behind us. Every time that happens, empires | fall- we are what we are today because of those that came before us | and their values. We forget those values and ways of life at our | own peril. How many people can make a wagon today- or shoe a | horse? What about butcher a pig- or even just wash their clothes | without a machine? How would a modern family keep one another | entertained if the TV, telephones and internet connection went | down? I think about that, and then I wonder what happens when the | gasoline runs out, or our military adventures isolate us from those | cheap foreign suppliers we've handed almost everything over to. A | synthetic life does not teach people how to cope with the real | world and it's challenges. Ancient Rome is a great example- they | were powerful and technologically advanced. They had cental heat | and indoor plumbing, great works of art and amusement for the | masses. If you were there, it would have seemed it couldn't end, | right? But then of course, there were a thousand years of darkness | that followed on it heels- and they didn't have quite so far to | fall as we do.
Take a slightly different perspective and ask yourself how long would it take to, for example, learn to make a wagon (starting from what you know right now) with no requirement that the wagon be particularly beautiful (that could come later)? How long to learn to butcher a hog; or to wash clothes by hand?
No matter what, you can't fall any farther than all the way. Yup, it definitely could happen. The really important question becomes how long does it take to get back on your feet?
| Getting back to your original statement, it *does* take wisdom- but | where is our wisdom coming from these days? I hate to think that it | is from YouTube and Comedy Central. The same for courage- the only | times I see that word used any more are in the context of killing | foreign people with rediculously advanced weapons or when someone is | dying of cancer. There used to be more opportunities for it (and | there still are- it just seems to be a concept that is going by the | wayside.)
Both are alive and well to the extent that they ever have been - they're just not talked about as much. I've found it interesting that many people are more comfortable talking about excrement than they are speaking of either wisdom or courage. When we get past shocking one another with the inevitable, then perhaps we'll have more time for the things we admire and respect.
| Anyway, another fairly useless rant on my part. | ||||| During my corporate life, I observed that many of the old timers ||||| were afraid to share in fear of their jobs. My old boss pointed ||||| out the stupidity of that: "How are these guys ever going to ||||| move up if they don't have a replacement for their vacancy?" ||| ||| Also very true- I've been training one of the shop lackeys in ||| setting up the mill and running the laser cutter whenever ||| possible. If he can get to where he can take that over for me, ||| great! I already know that when that happens, I'll be heading ||| into the engineering department full-time. || || Hmm. I'm trying to reconcile this good news with your last || paragraph below. :-? | | There is something to reconcile? I'm not taking another person's | place, I'm creating a new position to help with an increased | workload (there is *no* full-time engineer on nights). There's a | bottleneck in engineering, and I can help clear it up- but there | needs to be someone who can do my job as well, or it's just moving | the bottleneck elsewhere. Right now, I'm doing double and | sometimes triple-duty.
<g> Thank you for clearing that up so nicely. Only really small people need to leave their boot marks on other peoples' shoulders. If you help the people around you to grow and be strong, most will be glad to give you a boost.
| Or was it the difference between "forward" and "up"? I confess, I'm | not even entirely clear on that myself- it's a sort of fuzzy matter | of semantics. I guess the idea of moving forward is just more | appealing to me, without the mental image of climbing up someone | else's back and stepping on their head when I get there, which | seems to be a common practice.
IMO, it'd be a really Good Thing to achieve some inner clarity on this one. Might even be a good lunchroom discussion...
|| But there's no call to feel like a jerk. For everything that you || (or I) do, there's likely to be at least one other person who can || do one of those things better. IMO, a better response would be || gladness to have found someone from whom we can learn. The jerks || are the people who resent those who've found a better way and || won't learn from them. "Jerkhood" doesn't fit what I've seen of || you here. :-) | | Well, thanks! But that doesn't stop me from feeling shame about not | having found the most efficient way of doing something I'm being | paid to do. As noted in the previous post, it's what keeps me | hungry to learn- if I didn't feel anything but positive about being | shown up from time to time, it'd be too easy to assume I've got it | figured out and just coast.
Not a chance. It'd out the first time you were honest with yourself.
||| Must be the difference between corporate and production ||| environments- I usually think "forward" as well, but I hear "up" a ||| lot. To move "up", I'd have to be doing things I don't think I'd ||| like doing, like finding ways to push people out of thier jobs and ||| sneak into their place. || || One of my discoveries has been that those people who keep an eye || out for problems and offer good solutions for those they have the || ability to solve (not necesarily all they find) build an in-house || reputation as problem solvers. In healthy operations solutions to || problems and the people who produce those solutions are valued || highly. | | An apt summary of what I try to do- which is why I get to move | forward.
Bingo! :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

I guess I was lucky in a way. My first real job was for GE back in the late '50s. I was told when I hired on that I had two jobs - train my replacement and make myself superflous. If I could do that, there'd be a better job waiting.
I have no idea if GE still follows that philosophy, but I did every place I worked. Even when I became a free lance "consultant" I told my customers that my job was defined by 5 "d"s. Design, document, develop, debug, and disappear.
Always worked for me.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Prometheus wrote:

A person who can rise only by others falling doesn't deserve to rise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Dec 14, 2006, 6:10am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@topworks.ca (Robatoy) doth query: <snip> Thoughts?
If a company wants to let you go, they'll find a way.
I got laid off in 90 ( plant closed), and again in 95 (office closed). Most places, doesn't matter what the experience, you get to a certain age and they don't want to hire you - and usually don't. I don't know how many time I heard, "You're too experienced for the job" - meaning they didn't want to hire me because of my age, and this allowed them to get away with it.
I also heard a lot of BS about wanting people that would "stay and grow" with the company. Saw a lot of younger people hired, then they'd bail in a year or two, when a better paying job came along. Heard a lot of talk about promoting from within too, but that usually meant instead of listing the job, and letting people aplply for it, they'd just hire someone from outside the company, and claim they'd reviewed the records and no one was qualified, or they'd post the qualifications for the job so high no one could qualify.
At one time a lot of jobs required someone with a 8th grade education. Time went by, and they upgraded the requirements to a high school graduate, but the actual squills required were still only at an 8th grade level. More time went by, and now to qualify for the same job you have to have four-year college degree - even tho the actually skills required to do the job are still only at an 8th grade level. So there's a lot of jobs out they that people can't get, simply because they don't have a high enough education, not because they can't do the job. Sad really.
I've seen supervisor after supervisor who had no idea at all what the people under their supervision actually did. One production line position a new worker was trained by another worker. Well, the new worker kept screwing up. So they fired him and hired someone else. The new guy was "trained" by he same person. This new guy was fired for screwing up too. Repeated several times. I don't know how they finally solved the problem. The four-year college degree "supervisor" had no idea in the world what was going wrong, because he didn't bother learning what his people where supposed to be doing and how they were supposed to do it. What he should have done is to learn right from the start what his people did and how they did it, then train all new workers himself. Way back when, any time I transferred to a new assignment, I learned what my troops did and how they did it, then within six months I could do ANY job any of my people could do, sometimes better. I could watch someone work for just a minute or two and see if they were doing it right or not. If they were doing it right, I'd say good job, and move on. If they weren't doing it right, I'd correct them, watch for another minute or two, and moved on. I din't have to harass my people to get good work out of them, for one thing, because they knew if they got behind for some reason, Id jump in and help. Try that with 99.99% of the supersors in the commercial sector - it ain't gonna happen. I've found too that the managers usually didn't know what the supervisors were supposed to do either.
Life's a bitch, then you reincarnate.
JOAT Where does Batman buy gas for the Batmobile?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Times have changed. Years ago, it was common to leave school after the 8th grade to help support the family. In today's environment, any kid that wants to get through high school can, at no cost in the public schools. Problem is, many of them don't want to because they are just plain lazy. I have jobs that don't even require an 8th grade education, but I won't hire anyone that does not have a HS diploma. Believe me, I've tried and the kids that can't make high school, just don't want to work and be a part of normal society. They want to do their own thing and not follow any rules. Be gone, you lazy SOBs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Dec 17, 2006, 11:01pm snipped-for-privacy@snet.net (EdwinPawlowski) doth sayeth: Times have changed. Years ago, it was common to leave school after the 8th grade to help support the family. In today's environment, any kid that wants to get through high school can, at no cost in the public schools. Problem is, many of them don't want to because they are just plain lazy. I have jobs that don't even require an 8th grade education, but I won't hire anyone that does not have a HS diploma. Believe me, I've tried and the kids that can't make high school, just don't want to work and be a part of normal society. They want to do their own thing and not follow any rules. Be gone, you lazy SOBs.
One of the stories I've heard for wanting four-years college grads is because they "have shown the capability of learning". But the grads they finally hired apparently decided they had learned all they needed to learn, because the most they'd study after that was the sports page. And from their capability, they must have cheated their way thru school.
I had full custody of my two sons, from the time they were 3 and 7, and was working 2d shift. My older kid went thru HS. The younger son dropped out entering the 9th grade. The story I got from the school and teachers at the time was a lot different from what I later found out was true. Basically, he got pushed down the cracks. He's now got a good job doing refrigeration. The older son does heating and air conditioning. The shame of it is, I think the younger son is wasting his talents; he's never been tested, but I think he could be one of the brightest people I've ever met. Years back he asked me about a mechanical problem on a car. I didn't know the answer, but looked it up. Me, I'm not dumb, but had to read the entire article, look at the pictures, and read the captions, before I understood how to do it. Even then, I figure it would have taken me a good part of the day to do the job. I showed him the article. He looked at the pictures first, not even reading the captions. Then went out and did the job, in about 15-20 minutes. No telling what he could do if his teachers had just taken the time.
By the way, it's LOADS easier on a single mom than it is on a single dad. A woman where I was working got divorced when her husband left her, get this - because he wanted to do woodworking for a living. Any time she needed time off for her kids, it'd be, "No problem, we know you're divorced". Any time I needed time off for my kids it'd be, "Whjy can't your wife do that?". Me, "Because I'm divorced, remember?". Then it was, "Oh, yeah, well, we'll have to see what we can do.", and this crap continued for the entire time I worked there.
JOAT Where does Batman buy gas for the Batmobile?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 19 Dec 2006 11:56:43 -0500, J T wrote:

Dumb question, but is he happy doing what he's doing? I had the misfortune to be labelled a "smart kid", which meant that I was pushed hard away from certain career options (enlisted military, mechanic, carpenter, etc) and toward sit-in-office-shuffling-papers options. Wasted most of my life doing crap that I hate and am not very good at because of that.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tue, Dec 19, 2006, 6:00pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (J.Clarke) doth query: Dumb question, but is he happy doing what he's doing? I had the misfortune to be labelled a "smart kid", which meant that I was pushed hard away from certain career options (enlisted military, mechanic, carpenter, etc) and toward sit-in-office-shuffling-papers options. Wasted most of my life doing crap that I hate and am not very good at because of that.
Matter of fact, yes. The kid is about a mechanical genius. I encourged him to try auto mechanics, because he's so good at it, but he likes doing that, and if he did it for a living, he wouldn't enjoy it. Smart kid. But he's good at refrigeration and likes doing it.
Yeah, I was a smart kid too. Had a straight A average going into high school. Freshman - A average. Sophmore - B average. Junior - C average. Senior - D average, never even cracked a book, and skpped about 1/3d of the senior year. No one said a word. The school never even asked for a note from my parents, never called them. Still graduated. No counselling about college, or anything else. After two ear, went in the Army. Got out. Then 14 months later went back in. That was probably a saving move for me. But, knowing then what I know now I think I'd have went to college, probably for mechanical engineering, and gotten into R&D somewhere. But, I pay my bills, have a home that paid for, get enough to eat, and a few $ to spare on myself. Could be a lot worse, so I'm nit bitching. Life is basiclly good.
JOAT Where does Batman buy gas for the Batmobile?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Amen to that! I got custody of my two sons when they were both still in diapers. I worked for the railroad so money wasn't an issue but I couldn't even hire a live-in babysitter because the newspapers thought I was trying to lure a young woman into peril. Nope ... I was gone two days out of three on irregular shifts and just needed someone there when the phone rang at 1 a.m. calling me to work.
Room, board, cash, separate phone and a car (to use) with her LOCKING nicely furnished bedroom with private bath on the same floor as my sons' room and my room on a separate floor.
But I couldn't even run the ad in the paper nor place on the bulletin board of the local junior college. Eventually the 'old girl' network set me up with a teenage runaway who had run out of alternatives to living on the street. The closest we ever came to being intimate was when I bought her a skirt to wear to a wedding so she'd have something new to wear. Wrap skirts don't need precise sizing. She went downstairs to put it on then came back upstairs to show it off ... then hurried up to get ready for her date with her young swain.
But by then I'd missed so much work that my savings were simply gone. Shortly afterward I got laid off for a couple of months and that was enough to lose the (rented) house.
Yeah ... the wimmin' got it a lot easier. (BTW, my ex wife made exactly 4 child support payments before bailing out to Minnesota.) Even though most of their pay might go to the sitter, at least they can find a sitter to hire.
In the end, caring for my kids cost me that job. I've never had a job that paid that well since and I don't expect I ever will.
Bill
--
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 0662-0, 12/22/2006
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill in Detroit" wrote in message

In the end, marrying the wrong woman cost you that job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Dec 23, 2006, 6:30am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) doth sayeth: In the end, marrying the wrong woman cost you that job.
Maybe, but how are you going to predict something like that?
JOAT Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength. - Eric Hoffer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"J T" wrote in message

Some do, some don't, but even after the fact put the blame squarely where it lies ... considering the situation it should be nothing but pure pleasure to do so anyhow.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/23/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

When placing blame will put food on the table or ease my mind about my own role, count me in. But not until.
I've never yet seen a divorce (although I don't dispute that they are theoretically possible) where all the blame rested on one side of the aisle and none on the other.
Compared to her, I did pretty good with my end of the marriage ... and the judge agreed by giving me full custody of two young guys fresh out of diapers. But not compared to what I should have done.
What I did was (mostly) legal. But that doesn't make it wise.
Bill
--
Time you enjoy wasting, was not wasted.
John Lennon
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Dec 23, 2006, 12:16am snipped-for-privacy@online.com (BillinDetroit) doth sayeth: Amen to that! I got custody of my two sons when they were both still in diapers. <snip>(BTW, my ex wife made exactly 4 child support payments <snip>
My kids were 3 and 7 when my ex left. I thought she'd walked out, but she said left. Never did figure out the difference. Never got nickel one from her, nor did the kids. She's have very little contact with them from the start, now she can't understand whey they don't fall over her every word. They're 26 and 30 now.
Getting reliable babysitters was a bitch for me too. I was working 2d shift, couldn't get 1st shift, couldn't find a different job - which made it that much harder. A 1st shift job would have relieved a LOT of my problems. Eventually the plant closed, then did get a 1st shift job, about a year later, that required me to be there at 6:30 AM, vice the rest of the staff reporting at 8 AM. So still had problems, just different ones. I wasn't making top wages thru any of this. But we all did survive. Neither kid gets in trouble and both have good jobs. Life is basically good.
JOAT Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength. - Eric Hoffer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So still had problems, just different ones. I wasn't making top wages thru any of this. But we all did survive. Neither kid gets in trouble and both have good jobs. Life is basically good.
Yep, it is a matter of attitude. You seem to have a good one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Dec 23, 2006, 12:41pm snipped-for-privacy@snet.net (EdwinPawlowski) doth sayeth: Yep, it is a matter of attitude. You seem to have a good one.
In the words of Bal Simba: Life does not always give us what we want. Very often we must choose to accept what it gives us with the best grace possible.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote: Neither kid gets in trouble and both have good jobs. Life

Well, now. It appears we DO have a couple of similarities. One son served in the USMC, works for Ford in Twin Cities (for now, anyways), is married and has a young daughter. The other got a GED, went to tech school and is now the big kahuna for tech support for a company called "BobCAD". Along the way he, too, got married and is presently enrolled in 4 year college full time and is in honors college with a 4.0 for the past couple of years.
The kid speaks Spanish, Gaelic and Japanese. The Spanish and Gaelic are fluent.
We all survived, sort of, although there are scars. Life goes on.
Bill
--
Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure that there is one
rascal less in the world.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The _really_ sad thing is that a college education today is almost equivalent in literacy/knowledge to an 8th grade education pre 1972.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/16/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're not kidding there. When I went to college in about eight years ago, it was easier than high school. Very hard to justify the huge price tag on it if you're looking for education, and not just a paper that will get you a job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right now, I have a college grad working in the shipping department. I wish he was as smart as some of the 8th graders around from the past.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.