OT (sort of) French door building

The exterior doors on my four-year-old home have started to rot. In true woodworker fashion I decided to rebuild the doors. I even decided to redesign the doors into french doors. I have rebuilt the door frames and repaired the doors; then I ordered a t astrigal to seal between the doors. Here is my problem, do any of you fine people know the proper way to install this thing? It is just slightly longer than the door (maybe an inch or less) but if I cut it the flush bolts will not line up with the predrilled holes. I purchased the thing from a local door manufacturer and the smug little salesman laughed when I told him I was going to install it myself. As I was leaving he yelled "good luck" and I am sure he made some type of "he'll be back" comment. Now I realize I am probably being arrogant and maybe even foolish....but...damn-it I'm an American, and I don't like be told I can't do something; especially by some sniveling sales puke that probably doesn't know how to hold a hammer. So fellow woodworkers, give me some advice or websites or something. You see, even though this tough old American isn't afraid of any salesman, my wife hates the plywood covered hole in our living room, and I am scared to death of her.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

get her to do it?
OK, bad idea.
I'm used to an astragal being a wood molding used to finish the join between two doors. it sounds like you are talking about a metal product. can you find a name of it anywhere? posting a link to a picture somewhere on the web would be helpful.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You'll probably have to trim a bit off both the top and the bottom, and if you don't have enough ground clearance to to line up the holes you'll have to remove the door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cut it the same length as the door and let the weatherstripping do the rest. It usually goes on the 'fixed" door.

true
a
inch
little
doesn't
You
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you haven't done so already, you need to figure out why your doors only lasted 4 years and remedy that situation before you go about building new doors.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
____

"To know the world intimately is the beginning of caring."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I worked in a door shop for about 14 years but I'm a little confused with your question. You state the predrilled holes for the flush bolts won't line up if you cut the astragal off. If you mean the holes in the sill and header of the frame, cutting or not cutting the astragal isn't going to change the position of the pins on the flush bolts. If it's a wooden astragal and you actually mean the premortise for the flushbolts themselves then you can cut the astragal off and lengthen the mortise with either a router or use a forstner bit in your drill press and a bandsaw. If you are talking about a metal product there should be a strip of plastic that snaps into a channel that can be removed and trimmed. The flush bolt can then be moved and repositioned.. hopefully.... depending on who the manufacturer is. If it is actually the holes in the sill and the header of the frame causing you trouble then plug the holes in the header with a dowell and glue. cut some slivers of wood to drive into the screw holes with some glue and trim flush.. then redrill in the position you need. If you have a wood sill do the same there.... if it's metal get a small piece of flat aluminum and make yourself a plate wide enough to cover the existing holes and drill where needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.