OT: Simple English

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In wrote:

What I do not comprehend is those among us who consistently
fail to appreciate the thought implied attempt to further elucidate upon the actual etymology fail miserably at any semblance of bonhomie.
Is it not nice to know trhat we have a lot for which to thank the Jutes, Angles, and Saxons for our verbiage? That is not to cast any aspersions upon those who utilized Sanskirt in their daily communications.
Mendatum caco.
P D Q
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Whao!, Q! I never knew!
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wrote:

I thought so too, that's why I passed it along. A friend of mine in Winnipeg sent it to me, and he got it from a hooker in Havana...so I don't know who to give credit to.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hopefully that's all he got from the hooker in Havana.
B.
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Imagine my surprise, taking a linguistic course [to satisfy the 6 hr cultural heritage degree requirement], to find that English is, in fact, Germanic in it's origins. Go figure.
Dave in Houston
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Oh, yes. Most of the English words for the basics of everyday life are unmistakeably Germanic:
Bier, Wein, Milch, Wasser, Brot, Butter, Mett = beer, wine, milk, water, bread, butter, meat
Vater, Mutter, Bruder, Schwester = father, mother, brother, sister
Haus, Tafel, Stuhl = house, table, chair (stool)
Hand, Finger = (obvious)
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On Jan 15, 6:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Meat = Fleisch
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On 1/15/2010 10:20 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Now, I don't care who you are, that there is funny!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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Hey! did you watch Leno last night.? LOL
He had a comedian on the show that covered England English, Russian, German, etc.
He mentioned that the English over state the "T" sometimes, Sometimes not.
Open the letter
Open the LeT Ter.
Open the le'er
Talk to you la'er
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As a born Dutchman, I can fully understand.
In my 60+ years, Dutch has undergone at least 3 fully sanctioned changes in official spelling. At the introduction of the last one (or the one before that), the chair of the committee was explaining the rules and flaunted them by giving an example. Since I have been living in the US since 1969, I can't remember whether the change was from pannekoek to pannenkoek, or vice versa, since I now call it pancake.
Bisquick makes great "flensjes", say my grandkids.
--
Best regards
Han
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