OT: Shower tile

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A small section of the floor ceramic tile appears to have lost its glaze -- or whatever coating allows it to repel water and dirt. Any thoughts about what to use to restore it before I set out to rip and replace?
Thanks,
Larry
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On 1/2/2016 6:01 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

First, I'd check to see if the tile lost its glaze or it it is a buildup of hair spray. You'd understand that if my daughter used your bathroom.
The only way to restore a glaze is to coat it with glaze and fire it in a kiln. You can do it in you home oven if you can rig it to go to 1850 degrees.
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Thanks, Ed. I like a hot shower, but 1850 degrees is a tad hotter than I prefer.

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On 1/2/2016 6:47 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

He was referring to the oven temperature. 1850 degrees is the required temp to glaze a tile.
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wrote:

amineral build-up. Try cleaning with CLR or some other mild acid. If that doesn't work, try polishing with a very fine abrassive to see if you can restore the gloss. If you can, perhaps there is a chance of salvaging the tile.
Sounds to me like you might have very agressive alkaline water ??
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On Sat, 02 Jan 2016 20:26:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Lime Away a product, is very useful for cleaning tiles and stuff with alkalinity build up. Especially when it is warm. I would do it with gloves and warm water. Great for coffee machines, just needs to be purged a few times before using it to make coffee again.
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On 1/2/2016 9:19 PM, OFWW wrote:

--
Jeff

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wrote:

Yes, but no where near as effective.
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OFWW wrote:

As long as the conversation is about bathroom tiles, what is a good way to put re-adhere one that fell off (due to the vibration from sliding shower door being slammed too hard into the wall). It's 2" square, and both the wall and the tile have remnants of brown adhesive. It is in 2 pieces now, due to hitting the floor, but I consider that a non-issue as the pieces fit together seemlessly. If it makes any difference, the tile is in the "shower area" but not in an area that normally gets wet (it's higher than that).
Thanks! Bill
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wrote:

my opinion) just glue it back in with tile mastic, PL cement, or silicone. No guarantee it won't fall out again - but no guarantee the one beside it won't fall out first. Re grout after gluing.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thank you. Since I've just got one 2" tile, I'm trying to keep the cost under control. The space is so minimal (between tiles), that I think a little extra silicone will suffice as "grout" (assuming the silicone has some adhesive properties, as you seem to imply). Did I read that right? This is a tile "on the corner" (two edges showing).
Bill
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On 1/4/2016 7:09 AM, Bill wrote:

Silicone is both. In the situation you describe it will function quite well as an adhesive. If you have white grout (and kept it that way<g>) after you set the tile back in place the silicone cures, carefully mask the grout line are to just expose the width of the grout line showing on the other tiles. Squirt a small amount of the white silicone into the grout line and then take a WET finger and firmly press down and trace the grout line ONCE. It will leave you with a nice clean line. After it begins to set up, carefully remove the masking tape and pat yourself on the back.
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On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 09:04:03 -0600, Unquestionably Confused

pieces were glued together first, then down as the above.
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Unquestionably Confused wrote:

OFWW suggested. I would not have thought of that , and it would seem to eliminate the possibility of ending up with the "cracked tile look" (which is probably more likely, than not, without the crazy glue).
Thanks everyone for your suggestions!
Bill
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Silicone based products get a bad rap in my book, but not for the reasons m ost don't like it. It started years ago when it was touted as a product th at would seal any surface, could be used as an adhesive, would work for all kinds of minor repairs, and was the must have sealer/adhesive/caulk/waterp roofer for repair and remodeling.
Then we find out the hard way (NO warning from the GE people 40 years ago) that silicone sealer isn't UV resistant. So all the sheet metal flashings that have been sealed with this will leak in about 3 years.
We didn't know that surfaces to be sealed had to be PERFECTLY clean. Any t ype of surface residue will prevent a good seal.
No one told me it wasn't paintable. So with the really nice paints that I use that will adhere to motor oil (just a joke...) they would stick to the silicone, but peel off later.
Found out it worked reasonably well as an adherent, but did not penetrate c ertain surfaces well enough to call it an adhesive.
Result: No silicone product in the truck or on the job for the last 25 yea rs. There are much better products out there for each one of the tasks men tioned above, and they are a lot less money, too.
I see now they have different products that correct all the problems I had long ago, but on examination of the tubes I found at HD, they still don't h ave one product that is UV resistant, mildew resistant, paintable, etc., in one tube.
No thanks. I like PERMANENT repairs, repairs that I walk away from and nev er think about again.
If I was replacing a tile, I would use DAP with Microban. When do a tiny r epair like that I get the small tube in the correct grout color and glue it in, then use the DAP as grout.
As far as the problem with the glaze on the tile, no need to reiterate good solutions.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks for your post. So, if I follow you, you use the DAP as the adhesive too. Carefully scrape off all the old mastic, huh?
Bill

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On Tuesday, January 5, 2016 at 8:17:39 PM UTC-6, Bill wrote:

Yes. But depending on the age and type of mastic, I use an old chisel (like my POS Buck Brothers) or even a box cutter to cut away the mastic. The old mastic should have penetrated the tile backing well enough to make it impossible to get it all off.
The good thing about the DAP is that it is thick enough to make a dandy gap filler behind the tile, allowing you to put a good amount of the DAP onto the tile, and mash it gently into place, stopping when the tile is flush with the surrounding tiles.
After mashing into place, run the appropriate sized bead of DAP around the tile to match the grout joints, wipe away the excess DAP with a wet paper towel and give it a day to dry before use.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks! You guessed right. I used a box cutter. I even had to put a new blade in it (and it was still "impossible to get it all off", as you wrote below--but I think I got enough of it off). I found that my Crazy Glue was dried-up, so I'll pick up some of that with the DAP adhesive tomorrow. I hope my experience will serve as a good lesson for everyone not to shut their sliding shower doors too hard (and I'm glad I'm not upset at anyone else over it)! : )
Bill

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On 1/4/2016 8:09 AM, Bill wrote:

I started using the old standard DAP with mildewcide.. I think it's microban 2000.
I like it better than silicone. I have limited my use of silicone more and more, going back to other means, and only using it when needed. BTW , they make grout in a tube for small fixes, or having to seal the plumbing to the tile... Can't remember the name, great stuff.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

well, and works well.
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