OT: Separate hot and cold valves on kitchen taps save energy.

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On Fri, 05 Feb 2016 05:02:45 +0000, Spalted Walt

What you do not get is how pipe size reduction affects flow no matter what the fluid or gas is that is inside.
I have already proven it years ago on site, only an idiot would introduce a restriction into a piping system. No matter what the total size of the job is.
Is there a chance that the restriction will not bother anything? Yes, on small systems with low water consumption.
But, if the journeyman is worth his salt he would not take a chance knowing the problems that can arise and just do the job correctly.
Those pictures of the plumbing at your house is a good example of poor water flow. Every 90 degree angle reduces the water flow by the equivalent of 10 feet of straight piping. 45 degree elbows equal 5 feet of piping. Which is why long radius 90 degree elbows are made.
Yes, piping is part of the HVAC trade and you can get knowledgeable people and you can get backyard mechanics with no training and little experience.
Oh, and by the way, not all bell reducers are made from the same materials.
By the way, you would do well to look for a good plumbing contractor based on your pictures, with all those joints in the plumbing and you are concerned about one size increase on a dielectric nipple?
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snipped-for-privacy@newsgroup.pls says...

Uh, galvanized pipe is not "leaded". Lead pipe is just that, pipe made out of lead. Galvanized pipe is dipped in or plated with zinc, not lead. The major source of lead in residential plumbing is the solder in copper joints (assuming that there's not lead pipe coming from the street, as is the case in Flint, among other places), but in recent years lead-free solder has come into use.

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On 1/31/2016 9:42 AM, Leon wrote:

They had plastic inserts, that I did not understand at the time and removed thinking they were protective plugs. They are to keep the water from the leaded galvanized pipe.
They are glued in, and I could not remove the nipples, even with heat.
My old water tank had galvanized nipples too, w/o the plastic inserts. I guess before they realized that. So hot water is not always the same as cold.
--
Jeff

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On 1/31/2016 9:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The faucet does not waste water, the homeowner does. Takes 1/4 second to flip the handle to the side for cold only. Water heater tanks can have a buildup of minerals so it may not be so good to drink it.
Options are: Get in the habit of moving the handle Park the handle on the cold side Put a jug of water in the fridge for drinking Buy a fridge with a water dispenser.
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Fridge idea didn't work for me. It was 7 years before any water came out of it. ;)
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On 1/31/16 9:33 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Yeah, it's kind of a non-issue isn't it? All the newer single ball valves I've seen allow for turning to the cold water input hole without passing over the hot water hole. I think some older ones may have had a different design. But even then, as you say, it takes a millisecond to passover it.
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Looks like the original post was "Sun, 5 Jun 2011 09:20:59 -0700 (PDT)"
I looked up the archive... Haven't seen Han or Joe Autodrill around here in far too long or a bunch of the other guys who made this a fun discussion.
Use either link: http://www.homeownershub.com/woodworking/ot-separate-hot-and-cold-valves- on-kitchen-taps-save-energy-515723-.htm
https://groups.google.com/forum /#!topic/rec.woodworking/57rN3V4apIw[1-25]
Puckdropper
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

Depends on how old your house is. While the hot water heater tank is fine, there's some reason to think hot water can leach lead out of lead pipes, or lead soldered pipes.
Personally I don't think there's enough solder exposed to the water to cause a problem (altho century-old lead pipes is a different matter), but if you're the super cautious kind you might want to avoid drinking from the hot side.
John
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 06:30:39 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Dunno, I don't seem to have trouble moving the lever to the right. One of the men's room faucets at work is backwards, though. It's marked backwards, too, so maybe it's an intelligence test. ;-)
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