OT: Separate hot and cold valves on kitchen taps save energy.

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On 2/6/2016 11:03 PM, OFWW wrote:

We get a couple of calls a week about solar. The scam is that they lease to you and they reap most of the benefits and tax credits. Potential problem selling your house after 10 years when you have a 20 year lease on the solar panels.
You can buy outright, but payback is long.
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There was one company that not only leased the panels but handled maintenance and repair if the system ever needed it. They get the tax credits and a monthly fee, you get lower power bills and someone to handle the big stuff on the system (I'm sure you still have to do some stuff). Sounds like a case where both parties benefit.
I would have looked deeper in to them, I think it was Sun City, but they don't service my area.
Puckdropper
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On 2/7/2016 11:58 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

There is a web page devoted to the pitfalls of solar. If you ever get serious, check it out. Find out who pays to remove and reinstall when you need a new roof, selling your house, etc. Remember the "free lunch" saying.
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On 2/7/2016 3:02 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Exactly, needing a new roof was always a fear for me with solar panels.
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Not only that, but the deterioration really starts setting in about 10 years after initial startup if you live in a densely populated area, not sure about the countryside. The surfaces get etched by smog, and acid rain. So payback if done properly is in about 10 years, and then you can operate at about 50% for really free, or startup the vicious cycle all over again but with new technology.
The real beneficiaries of solar power is big business and large commercial properties who have to pay demand charges for their electricity. Those charges are truly excessive so solar power payback is quick under those circumstances.
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140F is recommended, IIRC.

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On 1/31/2016 9:42 AM, Leon wrote:

Not totaly true, my tank has galvanized nipples that goto the tank. They had plastic inserts, that I did not understand at the time and removed thinking they were protective plugs. They are to keep the water from the leaded galvanized pipe.
They are glued in, and I could not remove the nipples, even with heat.
My old water tank had galvanized nipples too, w/o the plastic inserts. I guess before they realized that. So hot water is not always the same as cold.
--
Jeff

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woodchucker wrote:

There is no lead in galvanized steel pipe. Just steel and zinc.
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On 1/31/2016 11:53 AM, woodchucker wrote:

The plastic insulates, as it was explained to me by a plumber, are to prevent electrolysis and premature failure.
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And don't mix above the plastic iron and copper. It will cause ionic current and ions. They get to the tanks with / without plastic barrier.
Happened on two heaters here. Lasted almost 10 years and the iron adapter (shade tree owner plumber before me) in both. I had replacements and the pipes cleaned up and replaced where needed. No iron. Plastic outside and copper inside.
Martin
On 1/31/2016 3:57 PM, Leon wrote:

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wrote:

yes, it is true. And for Woodchucker, electrolysis also takes place on cold lines with dissimilar metals, like galv pipe hooked directly to copper piping without a coupling designed for that purpose.
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Galvanic corrosion is caused by two or more dissimilar metals coming into contact with water. When this occurs, one of the metals becomes an anode and corrodes faster than it would all by itself, and the other metal becomes a cathode and corrodes slower than it would by itself. The copper supply line is the cathode and the galvanized nipple is the anode.
A dielectric nipple prevents the two dissimilar metals from contacting each other where water is present because the nipple is encased in plastic. The plastic is not only on the inside of the nipple but also extends past the end of the nipples. One of the side benefits of using dielectric nipples is that you seldom have leaks because the plastic ends act as washers and compress against the seat as the nipple is tightened.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-Dielectric-Nipple-2-Piece-15023/205681004
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 22:29:24 +0000, Spalted Walt

This is what has been used for decades before the "nipple"
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-4-in-Galvanized-Steel-FIP-x-Sweat-Dielectric-Union-FSU-HDLFDU-34/205019727?MERCH=REC-_-nosearch2_rr-_-NA-_-205019727-_-N
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Hence the the invention of the dielectric nipple:
http://hostedmedia.reimanpub.com/TFH/Step-By-Step/FH09JUN_MYTBUS_08.JPG
http://pages.citebite.com/d4j9u8c1e6uvl
http://www.opp.psu.edu/services/technical-bulletins/technical-bulletin-1/at_download/file
http://terrylove.com/images/homeowner/dilectric_union_1.jpg
http://terrylove.com/images/homeowner/dilectric_union_2.jpg
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On Mon, 01 Feb 2016 12:36:57 +0000, Spalted Walt

Looks to me like the dielectric coupling was doing its job just fine. No signs of leaks and the galv piping was getting messed up like it normally does.
You can see the flow restriction inherent in the design of the dielectric nipple, and it is considerable.
If I were to install one I would up it in size to the next largest diameter and use bell reducers on both ends to eliminate any problems. Side effect would be an increase of electrical resistance, a bonus.
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Judging by the cluelessness of your last statement, I'm sure I've seen your handiwork before. ;)
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/c7/ab/b4/c7abb449a0ed3221e60fac71de96880e.jpg
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On Tue, 02 Feb 2016 01:51:07 +0000, Spalted Walt

ROTFLOL, Sorry Walt, but you are as wrong as wrong can be. Think about it, anytime you put in a fitting with a diameter less than the piping around it, you have created a restriction. If you cannot understand that, well..........
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3/4" Camco dielectric nipple I.D. 0.75 in 3/4" type M copper pipe I.D. 0.811 in Difference .061 or ~3/50 in
So by all means, you go ahead and "use bell reducers on both ends to eliminate any problems".
BTW, nice sink!
https://metrouk2.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/ay_104134362.jpg
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On Wed, 03 Feb 2016 02:07:41 +0000, Spalted Walt

If I remembered correctly I stated to upsize the nipple to the next piping size to eliminate the restriction flow, and use bell reducers to install it into your installed piping size. That would mean use a 1" nipple on a 3/4" piping system.

Yeah, I thought the color would go good with your lifestyle. :)
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And except for wasting money, you will have accomplished absolutely nothing by doing that. You really don't get it do you?
Dielectric unions/nipples are used to prevent two *dissimilar* metals from contacting each other where water is present. By you connecting a *steel* 1" dielectric nipple between 2 *steel* bell reducers you've accomplished absolutely nothing (except look foolish).
HTH
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