OT: Replace plywood flooring: Perfect tool

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On Sat, 2 Jul 2016 05:55:18 -0700 (PDT), Michael

I would say "no", but I wouldn't nail down backer board, at all. It should be screwed every 6", or so. I put thinset between the plywood and backer, too.
To answer your original question, I was told that if the joists are 16"OC, the floor should be at least 1-1/4 inches thick. I used 3/4" plywood with 1/2" backer. It worked really well, though I did have to extend the toilet flange, raise saddles, and cut the door (fortunately, they were wood 6-panel doors).
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On 07/02/2016 7:55 AM, Michael wrote: ...

...
<http://www.jlconline.com/how-to/interiors/tiling-over-plywood-subfloors_o
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Leon wrote:

Thanks. I was guessing that, but reading particle board.
Bill
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On 7/2/2016 8:17 AM, Bill wrote:

LOL, Actually he did say particle board to begin with.
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On 7/1/2016 9:52 PM, Michael wrote:

Replace the subfloor cutout/patch with the same material as the existing subfloor material.
As John mentioned, span to the middle of two existing floor joists with your cutout/patch.
IOW, if your joists are on 16" OC, your replacement piece with ideally be the same material, and 16" in width (from side to side).
It is very common, and actually recommended, to install a cement backer board of some type on top of the subfloor where tile will be laid.
It is OK to do that with an OSB subfloor. Install with fasteners according to manufacturer's recommendation ... they all have that info on their websites.
The "thickness" of that cement board can be different for each room according to:
1. The status and usability of the subfloor (i.e., flatness, etc.)
2. The height needed for a smooth/acceptable transition into the next room, when you add together the thickness of the backer board, the thickness of the thinset/mortar, and the thickness of the tile.
Providing the floor is relatively flat, 1/4" thick backer board is generally sufficient; but 1/2" is most often used as it has more stiffness and will allow an acceptable transition.
Just insure that the sum thickness of the backer board, plus the thinset, plus the tile, will still give you an acceptable transition in height between one room and the next.
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"Michael" wrote in message

Either OSB or plywood of the same thickness as the rest of the sub-floor could be used... but if you have OSB I'd be inclined to make the patch out of it. Same recommendation on the face grain orientation for either. I'd hope it is 3/4" rated but it may be 5/8" or 1/2" rated... you'll have to measure or look for the grade stamps on the old sub-floor (if you can see the bottom of it).
In cases like this I tend to use the biggest patch that will fit (e.g., 32" - 48" wide and 32"-48" long) to spread the load. Small pieces of sheet goods flex too much unless you want to get involved with putting blocking between the joists--which is often a problem around the waste and supply lines. The last one I did the space was very tight (ridiculously tight as my shoulders had little clearance on either side!) so the patch wasn’t very big and there was no room for blocking between the joists. In that case I screwed blocking to the bottom of the existing subfloor and to the patch. That stiffened it up well...
Regarding the backer board, generally that can be screwed down. I use stainless or ceramic coated torx head screws and try to get many of them into joists rather than just the subfloor. Look for "deck screws" in the store.
I fully accept that some folks will think I over do it sometimes but I haven't had any failures to date so I'll keep doing it!
John
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On Wed, 22 Jun 2016 09:42:23 -0700 (PDT)

water damage around a toilet sounds optimistic
but i would use a thick blade in a skilsaw
might want to wear a dust mask and gloves
might find more work to do when you cut out the small square
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On Thursday, June 23, 2016 at 4:56:44 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

That is a concern, although we've left that bathroom unused for several months so whatever went on should be pretty dry by now. Still, you are right that this could be a much larger project than planned.
I have another question about multi-tools. I tried posting this question before but I don't see it.
I see that the Fein has a little fence that one case use for straight cuts. 1. Is this a standard attachment for multi-tools, esp. the DeWalt? 2. How well does that fence work?
Thanks,
Mike
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On 6/24/2016 9:40 AM, Michael wrote:

I am not aware of any fence, got a link?
I did see a depth stop but not necessarily a fence to guide the cut.
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On Saturday, June 25, 2016 at 9:57:39 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

That's my mistake. I was looking at this video and at the 1:50 mark or thereabouts I thought I saw a fence but it's probably a depth stop. Could it conceivably be used as a fence though?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7q6Au8fTLk

Mike
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On 6/25/2016 12:04 PM, Michael wrote:

NO, but you really don't need a fence. At least with the Fein the vibration is so little that you can easily follow a line.
Watching this video below, Dremel vs. a new DeWalt, I think the user was not real impressed with the slop in the blade clamp with the DeWalt and I absolutely did not like the switch. Much like a VS drill, you hold it and lock it on to full speed. The Fein and Dremel have a dial for speed and a switch that does not need to be held. You will find that you hold this tool in all different positions. This would be aggravating with the DeWalt if you are used to a Fein. Once turned on the Fein and Dremel can be held anywhere at any speed. Still the Fein is the gold standard and vibration would be a serious consideration if I were buying again. The user also mentions the DeWalt light only shining forward. That is not helpful if you use the blade at an angle in tight spaces. I use mine at an angle quite a bit. The light is a nice feature but not well thought out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPOcGccgvpU

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On 6/25/2016 12:04 PM, Michael wrote:

NO, but you really don't need a fence. At least with the Fein the vibration is so little that you can easily follow a line.
Watching this video below, Dremel vs. a new DeWalt, I think the user was not real impressed with the slop in the blade clamp with the DeWalt and I absolutely did not like the switch. Much like a VS drill, you hold it and lock it on to full speed. The Fein and Dremel have a dial for speed and a switch that does not need to be held. You will find that you hold this tool in all different positions. This would be aggravating with the DeWalt if you are used to a Fein. Once turned on the Fein and Dremel can be held anywhere at any speed. Still the Fein is the gold standard and vibration would be a serious consideration if I were buying again. The user also mentions the DeWalt light only shining forward. That is not helpful if you use the blade at an angle in tight spaces. I use mine at an angle quite a bit. The light is a nice feature but not well thought out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPOcGccgvpU

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Michael wrote:

Looks as if there is no reason it couldn't be used as a GUIDE for a clamped on piece of wood, using the wood as a fence; basically, it would work just like the shoe on a cut off saw, just smaller.
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