OT: Query about cutting foam insulation

I don't want to destroy my Forrest blade, but I need to make some precision cuts with that stiff foam insulation board.
Any blade recommendations?
Thanks Jerry
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Are you talking expanded, extruded, or some other type of foam? Expanded is the white bead foam, extruded us usually blue or pink, urethanes tend to be tan.
It will not ruin your blade. Plastic foam is much lighter than wood.
OTOH, the dust tends to be static prone and sticks to stuff easily. Best way to cut it would be a hot wire that actually melts the foam away. That is how it is done in industrial setups. Precision is about 1/32" though with practice, probably 1/16" for a beginner.
Next to that is a knife blade in a bandsaw; slower but no dust. Then a regular bandsaw blade. As for ruining blades, the one we use at work has been in the saw for about 12 years.
Hand saws work well also. The blades use for PVC pipe work very well. Ed
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Jerry, I go the 'neander' route with this stuff . . . use a hacksaw blade. Wrap the 'hand end' with some tape, etc. so you don't cut yourself.
Quick, easy, handy, and above all . . . CHEAP !! {too much trouble & cost to set-up a 'Hot Wire' system.
I've also used an old serrated 'frozen food' knife. {for cutting 'boxes' of frozen veggies}. It has also been said that an 'electric knife' with a serrated blade is both good & quick.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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I have done it on my table saw. But watch out for kick back!! The blade really wants to grab the foam. The upside is even if it kicks back, it is only foam so it doesn't hurt! Watch your hands around the blade when doing stupid people tricks like this! If the blade grabs the foam, let go, don't try to hold on! Greg
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Jerry Ranch wrote:

How precise? I cut white styrene foam by scoring it about halfway through with a utility knife and snapping it along the score line.
At an auction I attended a while ago, there was a Bosch foam-cutting saw for sale. You might look around and see if they still make them.
-- Steve
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Just go buy the cheapest blade you can buy, it will work like a charm you will get some of the foam melting to the blade but it will come off with blade cleaner. depending on the thickness you may need to snap off the remainder that has not been cut I just finished cutting up 4" think insulation for about 200 plus feet of foundation. It was quick and painless, just used a $10 rip blade

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Getting a cheaper rip blade for this makes sense, too. I was worried not only about ruining the blade, but whether the blade movement would shatter the foam rather than cut it. I'll be using the stuff that's about 2" thick
The box I am building is for research purposes (plant physiology) I need some pretty accurate cuts since I am building an insulated box in which I will bring in conditioned air. The box will be in a large walk in growth chamber at high temp, and the pots containing my corn plants will be in the foam box with a foam lid on it. The conditioned air will be brought in from the outside of the chamber..so the roots will see what they see under field conditions..cool and constant, and the aerial portion will see whatever I want them to see.
I'll support the foam box with treated lumber.
Thanks for the ideas people
Jerry

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