OT Need to drill stainless steel

What kind of bit is best for drilling 1 3/8" hole in stainless sink? step drill bit?
Thanks.
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Stoutman
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My experience with stainless sinks are that they are pretty cheap stainless. I drilled mine with a hole saw- no problem. They cut a little rough but most sink holes have- jeez I'm getting old, I forgot the word- rings around the things that go in the holes that cover the edges of the hole. A mind is such a terrible thing to lose. Will you visit me in the old folks home?
Richard
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*snip*
*cut into paragraph*

No, but I'd be willing to give a couple power tools a good home. ;-)
Puckdropper
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Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Holesaw. Goes much faster than you would expect.
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Stoutman wrote: | What kind of bit is best for drilling 1 3/8" hole in stainless | sink? step drill bit?
Greenlee makes punch sets that you operate with a wrench - that should work much better than a large diameter drill bit. You might DAGS to find a distributer...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Morris Dovey wrote:
> Greenlee makes punch sets that you operate with a wrench - that should > work much better than a large diameter drill bit. You might DAGS to > find a distributer...
Known as a Chassis Punch. WW Grainger has them per an old catalog, probably about $40.
Good for 10 ga max.
Lew
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Just go slow, that's what my brother-out-law says (he's a plumber). If your tool goes too fast and it heats up, the s/s will harden.
Using this advice I've used both my tungsten steel holesaw and the jigsaw successfully as well as drills.
-Peter
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Hole saw, use lubrication like a penetrating oil..Blaster, WD-40.. Go slow. Keep the tool as perpendicular as possible to the work surface. When it starts to break through it will tend to grab when cutting thin metal. Light feed pressure will reduce the occurence of finger and wrist repair due to the sudden spin/acceleration of the drill motor in the opposite direction.
x
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WD-40 has NO lubricitive properties whatsoever. "WD" stands for "water displacement".
-ZZ
wrote:

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Did this myself and used a (one piece) hole saw (not the kind that slips into a mult-ring disk!) and oil. Very easy if you go slow and keep lubricating.
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Wrong. But if you want to get picky, WD40 stands for "water dispersing". AND, yes, it also lubricates.
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Thanks guys! I think I'm gonna get a hole saw tomorrow from the big orange box!
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Stoutman
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You've probably got this done by now, but in my experience hole saws to metal don't work too well. I think it comes down to what the finished hole will look like. With a hole saw I have always had the issue that the final hole has some scrape marks around it where the teeth touched the metal. I'm not saying it's impossible to get a nice hole like the other posters. But if I were doing what you are and want a nice clean hole I'd use a punch. Those tapered bits that were mentioned are another option I've never personally used one, but have worked side by side with some that have and the holes those leave also aren't bad. Keep in mind any hole you cut in metal should be filed and will not come out as clean as something that was water jetted or cut with other industrial processes.
And for the WD-40 replies. This is directly from the manufacturers website: "With literally thousands of uses, WD-40 is the #1 multi-purpose problem solver. It cleans, protects, penetrates, lubricates and displaces moisture like no other product on earth."
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a greenlee punch works verry well i use them all the time you can get all sizes

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Stoutman wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/2uz45t
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