OT: need snake advice

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Dave Gordon wrote:

If it has that look and you can't remember, best err on the side of safety, but king snakes eat rattlesnakes (among other things), so they're nice to have around.

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I guess that's a subjective thing... In 60 years of fumbling around, I've NEVER met a snake that I considered nice to have around..
I'm only afraid of 3 kinds of snakes:
little ones, big ones and live ones
mac
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Tue, Aug 21, 2007, 10:35am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@bajadavis.com (macdavis) doth sayeth: I guess that's a subjective thing... In 60 years of fumbling around, I've NEVER met a snake that I considered nice to have around.. I'm only afraid of 3 kinds of snakes: little ones, big ones and live ones
I'm not "afraid" of snakes, but if you ever want to move, you can be my neighbor anytime.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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On Tue, 21 Aug 2007 10:35:26 -0700, mac davis wrote:

Well, that certainly puts you into the majority :-).
I find them really interesting. Who woulda' thunk that a land animal without legs could be so successful over the eons.
But my wife has the same opinion as you, so I haven't had any since I got married (38 years ago).
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I'd kill all the (f)'king snakes too. If I have a rat problem, I'll get a cat.
I've just come back from visiting friends in Cyprus (f. hot, since you ask). They have a breed of cat that was brought over from Egypt, that is bred specifically to kill snakes. I guess they have some mongoose in them. My friends had rescued (aka adopted) two stray kittens of this breed, and they were about 6 months old when they brought their first dead snake home. I have no idea how they killed it, but the snake was so big they couldn't lift it, and had to drag it into the kitchen to show "mummy".

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Dave Gordon wrote:

Cats have fun with non-venomous snakes, although they tend to use them as toys instead of killing them. Don't know how they do against European venomous snakes, but the pit vipers (rattlesnake, copperhead, and cottonmouth) supposedly can make short work of a mongoose (the pit vipers strike from a horizontal S-curve, the cobras and their kin strike from a vertical stance that makes them less agile), although I can't find a credible report of such an encounter ever having actually occurred.
On the other hand, California ground squirrels apparently can fight rattlesnakes succesfully http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-squirrel18aug18,1,3991018.story?track=rss .

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Tue, Aug 21, 2007, 3:11pm snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (J.Clarke) doth sayeth: <snip> On the other hand, California ground squirrels apparently can fight rattlesnakes succesfully <snip>
Remember watching either Animal Planet or National Geographic on TV, quite awhile back. They were doing a show on some rather mean little animal, somewhere in Africa. Damned if I can recall what it was. Anyway a mainsay in it's diet is very poisonous snakes. Someting like a very mean mongoose with a constant hangover. Anyway, the little bugger proceeds to kill a snake that has enough venom to probably kill an elephant, getting zapped in the face first. The snake dies, the wee little beasty drops. Then after about 8 hours, the little beast gets up, dines, and moves on. Makes one very thankful they're about the size of a housecat and not a lion say. Hmm, honey badger is the name that comes to mind, but I'm not sure that's it.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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The man from Wikipedia, he say yes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratel
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There was an interesting article in yesterdays Globe and Mail about honey badgers; see here http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20070821.wbadgermain21/BNStory/International /
(J. Clarke) doth

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Wed, Aug 22, 2007, 11:27am (EDT+5) d@p (DaveGordon) doth sayeth: The man from Wikipedia, he say yes.
Yep, that does indeed appear to be the little bugger. I especially like this two following quites from that link: They have been named the most fearless animal in the Guinness Book of World Records for a number of years. And: Adult honey badgers rarely serve as prey for lions and leopards; however, their ferocity and thick, loose skin make it hard to grip or suffocate them and predation difficult. Old, weak honey badgers are more likely to fall prey to leopards, lions, and pythons, but even old honey badgers will defend themselves as vigorously as possible. In one case, shown on an episode of Animal Planet, an old female honey badger that was nearly toothless and had one blind eye was attacked by a leopard. It took the leopard about one hour to kill the honey badger.
Hmm, I wonder. If they imported a batch of those, and turned them loose, would the pit bull population go down? LMAO I think I'd about as soon live in bear country as to find out.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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I've had several reports over the years of house cats killing rattlers, but never actually seen it happen.. When we first moved to Baja, our cats were trying to break the world record for the number of Kangaroo Rats killed and left in the shower..
mac
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2007 11:18:49 -0700, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Not a viper at all. The Eastern Hognose eats frogs and fish. The Western Hognose eats rodents. The Eastern "plays dead" much more readily than the Western. Unfortunately, both loose the tendency to do that in captivity.
Oh, and I _have_ been bitten by a Western Hognose. Its mouth sure wasn't closed.
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2007 23:52:39 +0000, Art Greenberg wrote:

Agreed. It ISN'T a viper, that's just the common name. A lot of farmers in KY, where I grew up, were convinced it was a poisonous viper.

Don't know about the Western variety, but I participated in an educational program put on by U of K many years ago at the state fair. We had samples of every snake native to KY. One was the hognose. I regularly put my finger into its mouth as part of the lecture to prove it wouldn't bite - it never did.
You're also right about the rapid taming. We had to get another wild one about every other day to demonstrate the playing dead action :-).
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Just saw the msg.
My advice, get a 5 gallon bucket and relocate them. I just moved to south GA and so far have caught 2 baby rattlers. In TN we had more of a problem with copperheads. I kill neither, just moved them to an area w/o people. Do a goggle search and see how many people in the US die from snake bites. I think you will find that MAYBE 5 people a year die from them and 4.5 of those people were 'playing' with the snake at the time.
I have found most people have an irrational fear of snakes and firearms. It comes from ignorance, do a little research on the subject and you'll realize that a snake, even a 4 foot rattler, isn't really that dangerous as long as you don't do anything stupid.
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"no spam" wrote:

Good job for animal control.
Lew
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By the time animal control gets there the odds are the snake is going to be gone. Unless someone is keeping it there which is a better way to get bit than trying to get it into a bucket.
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We had an interesting snake event here a few months ago:
A friend of our neighbor has been living in their RV while building a house.. The house is finished and they're moving stuff from the trailer to the house and from the carport to the house.. He picks up a dresser in the carport and it buzzes at him... oh,oh..
Sets it down and investigates from a distance and finds that the top drawer is empty except for a very upset rattlesnake... He calls my neighbor, who asks him "why did you call me?" The guy says that because my neighbor used to farm, he must have experience with snakes, right? Neighbor says that he has that experience and doesn't desire any more, especially dealing with snakes in furniture.. tells him to call security.. (We live in what you could loosely call a gated community and it's patrolled by private patrol) He and I both asked "what can security do?" and he said "More than I will".. lol To everyone's surprise, security showed up 20 min later with an "ecology" team, who captured the snake and took it with them, presumably to release in the desert...
mac
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Tue, Aug 21, 2007, 7:35am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@msn.com (tom) doth sayeth: <snip> I don't know where you read "like a bumble bee sting", but do a little more research, and I think you'll find this to be true: http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/ecoview/Eco30.htm Tom
I don't know where I read it either, and I'm probably not going to bother to try to find it, as it was years ago.
I would say partially true. Do you mean the National Geographic shows on TV alligator attacks on people in Florida, sometimes killing them, are untrue?
I'll go along with the guy who relocates poisonous snakes. I stay where I am, they get relocated to snake heaven.
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Kill the snake and be especially careful of the baby ones.

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Jim Bailey wrote:

When I lived in Florida we used to see two or three a year, generally just passing through. Always killed them on general principle, but they never actually did any damage except to a cat who thought he was a mongoose.
Yeah, you can get bitten--they don't always warn you--but generally if you leave them alone they'll leave you alone. Learn their habits and don't reach where snake is likely to be resting unless you're sure there's no snake there and you shouldn't have a problem with them.
The kid and the dog are the real worries because they'll try to mess with the snake and the snake will defend itself.
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