OT: More jobs gone

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Campbell Soup Co will shed nearly 800 jobs as part of a series of cost cuts, which include exiting the Russian market, automating operations at a factory in Australia and closing one in the United States.
The company's stock rose 0.8 percent in after-hours trading following the announcement on Tuesday.
The world's largest soup maker has about 18,400 employees worldwide, including about 1,200 at its headquarters in Camden, New Jersey
More at: http://news.yahoo.com/campbell-soup-cut-jobs-save-money-211238782.html
Perhaps we can use this thread to help keep each other informed about the state of employment. Sort of like "the river keeps risin'". In this case "the soup spilled...".
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"Bill" wrote:

---------------------------------
I'm surprised they still had production operations in Camden.
New Jersey is known as the "Garden State"; however, probably not much land in cultivation today and my guess is that Camden is something other than the Garden spot in the Garden state these days.
The buildings are probably still brick and mortar that were built over 100 years ago, IOW, very high maintenance.
The canning industry only operates about 3 months a year of non stop operation.
The other 9 months are spent doing PM, ripping out old lines and installing new ones.
Other than engineering and maintaince, they are operating with a skeleton crew.
That 800 number probably includes a lot of seasonal production folks.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

They didn't say so in the article, but Campbell's company headquarters is in Camden, NJ. In case anyone is curious, it's just across the river from Philadelphia. This doesn't bother me as much as the closing of the furniture factories, but it puts me in the same mood.
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Dad, being from New Jersey, always referred to it as "The Garbage State." And yes, you knew when Camden was making tomato soup. There are fresh tomatoes, ripe tomatoes, and then, tomatoes destined for soup!
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"Steve" wrote:

------------------------------------- If you were to drive thru the Central Valley of California during tomato harvesting season, you and/or your father would probably feel right at home.
SFWIW, the acidity in tomatoes and the elevated processing temperatures used to process tomatoes totally destroy the stainless steel processing vessels in just a few years and they must be replaced.
Good business for everybody.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message
"Steve" wrote:

------------------------------------- If you were to drive thru the Central Valley of California during tomato harvesting season, you and/or your father would probably feel right at home.
SFWIW, the acidity in tomatoes and the elevated processing temperatures used to process tomatoes totally destroy the stainless steel processing vessels in just a few years and they must be replaced.
Good business for everybody.
Lew
----------------------
Yummm! Added iron and nickel in your diet!
mike
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Only solution is to eat more soup. I imagine the competition is a factor.
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From the link above: "It will also outsource a larger portion of its U.S. retail merchandising activities to its current retail sales agent Acosta Sales and Marketing, a move that will result in the loss of 190 positions." I would assume that Acosta will be hiring then. So about 1/4 of the jobs lost will mean more jobs with another company. Other job losses are in Russia and in Victoria, Australia. That limits the impact here in the US ... Some day companies will realize that outsourcing doesn't always result in more profits.
--
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Han
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The real shame of all this outsourcing, is that it is driven by our own greed. We all want to see the greatest return on our investments, retirement accounts, and savings, and this is how these companies accomplish that goal. They cut the jobs of the very people that are investing in the stock to begin with.
If you go back just one or two generations, the "Average" man did not own stock. It was just too expensive, and remained the realm of the wealthy (ruling class). They had so much money already, that it was OK for a company to return modest profits at times. Nobody had to jump ship on the stock market, simply because they already had so much money, that it just didn't matter. The rich could afford to endure a certain amount of losses, banking on the overall trends to balance things out. Therefore companies could be relaxed to some extent in the decisions they made regarding how they spent the company's revenues. Some quarters were just better than others. No big deal!
Then came the mutual fund . . . Everything changed drastically. Suddenly, there were sources of investment money that could topple a major company with one sale of it's stock. Before these mutual funds, no one man could make such a large difference in the financial condition of a company, regardless of how rich that one man was. But a mutual fund is managed by a small group who control the money of thousands of investors. So when they make a decision to sell, it can seriously hurt a company, regardless of how big they are.
This put huge pressure on the upper management of these companies to show significant profits all the time, not just when the market was favorable. The average guy thinks nothing of making drastic changes in his investments when they show even the slightest dip in performance. And the people who run those mutual funds know this. So they demand unrealistic performance from the companies that they invest the mutual fund's money in. And the companies have to respond with any strategy that will give the bean counters the numbers they need to publish for the earnings reports. And all of this goes on without you or me knowing anything about it. We just make knee jerk decisions when we decide who to invest our money with.
I don't know about you, but I ALWAYS choose to put my money in the best performing mutual funds. Only logical decision right? Or have I been guilty of perpetrating the very problem that necessitates this outsourcing behavior? I wonder if things wouldn't have been better leaving the "ruling class" to rule? Let's face it . . . They are raised in the Wall Street environment, and they are trained to make these decisions. They have the benefit of generations of experience behind them. Us little guys jumped in, put a LOT of money and power behind a select small group of marginally trained people, and now we are seeing the end result of our short sightedness.
The very rich are still the very rich, and the working class is still the working class. The only thing that has changed significantly, is that a LOT of us have lost our jobs to the very thing that we thought was going to make us rich. Our own greed has been our undoing. Less than one percent of any given population ever changes ranks in the financial standing.
The best that a working class person can do to become wealthy, is to make a multigenerational pact within the family unit. I watch the Eastern cultures do it all the time. The Patriarch and Matriarch handle the "Family" wealth. They see to the needs of the younger family members, who then become contributors to the "Family" wealth. They build the pool of family wealth over a long period of time, never touching the main pool of capital. Each family member continues to contribute (a percentage) to the pool. In due time, the family pool of wealth becomes substantial, and begins to pay enough dividends to more than offset the input made in the early years of the junior family members. At some point, there is enough to educate the children without undo hardship on the family. Further down the line, there will be enough income from investments to satisfy the needs of the family entirely. Beyond that, the entire family will eventually be truly wealthy. They then rise to the ruling class at some point. They have learned to harness the real power of the family unit, in a way that nature has done for as long as time itself. Bees, ants, church tithing and pack animals have done this sort of thing forever. It is quite simply known as the "Hive Mentality". It can and will work for humans too!
This can be started slowly. Just have each family member contribute 10% of their gross income. Never touch the principal, and only disperse 10% of the earnings once a year. The first few years it will only result in a piece of candy or a soda pop. But think of what the numbers will be by the time your great grandchildren are your age. They will likely get a fully paid college degree. In two more generations, each family member will be able to draw a stipend to live on. And so on, until your family has joined the ranks of the "Ruling Class"! At this point, nobody in your family will need to worry who has the jobs, they won't need them any more.
Just something to think about!
--
Offered in the spirit of friendship and respect :)
Kevin

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wrote in message

Yup, the blind pursuit of profit *now* with little care for what will happen down the road is responsible for some bizarre and self-destructive corporate behavior, the recent insanity on Wall St. being a good example. There was an e-mail between employees at S&P if memory serves, one guy telling another that by the time the consequences of selling AAA ratings to companies issuing toxic securities came due the two employees would have moved on someplace else, so it wasn't going to be their problem.
Cutting costs on the furniture you build by using fewer screws and less glue would obviously be a foolish policy, yet that's the formula business uses today--cut costs to boost profits and to hell with what will happen later.
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On 6/29/2011 12:03 PM, DGDevin wrote:

Ahhh, yes... The rise of the MBA in upper management.
--
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I was basically with you until I got to the paragraph above. It reminds me of reassuring the slaves working in the fields that "this was the natural order of things".
I am not sure I agree at all that the ability to make good decisions is naturally inherited from generation to generation. Your suggestion (above) sounds decidedly socialistic.
Regarding your idea below. It reminds me of certain church denominations (this IS power in numbers). Of course, every family is free to save however they wish. Creating pacts, like social security, obligating the unborn seems a bit unfair to me though and probably will appear unfair to them too. I can tell your intent is good.
Bill
Us little guys jumped in,

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Like it or not, we all exist in this type of social system to some extent or another. I will reiterate that in my opinion, not everyone is right to be elevated to such a position of power that wealth brings. All you need do is look at any tabloid to see that. Far too many are thrust into wealth and power for which they are ill-equipped to handle. They typically suffer terribly as a result.
I also do not believe that every individual inherits the capability to deal with the station they are born in to. Many family fortunes are squandered or lost as proof of this. Others have the care and responsibility wisely taken from them by their own families to prevent them from harming themselves/others/or the integrity of the estate.they have inherited.
As for automatic inclusion in such a program . . . You need look no further than the Royals of England for an example of this in action. There are many of them who do quite well with their positions within the business life of the monarchy, and others who are better off with title and a stipend. At any rate, they are normally educated to participate within that social sphere. And then there are the Ferggy types who just can't adapt, regardless of education and training.
Personally . . . I'm glad it was never thrust on me to be required to make such a decision. I'm sure it has it's blessings, but it also has to have it's own unique problems and limitations as well!
--
Offered in the spirit of friendship and respect :)

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

With all due respect, you seem undecided about the whole thing. Are you asking, reflecting, or trying to explain? You seem more familiar than usual with England, so I take it you have some English blood?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
<snip> But think of what the numbers will be by the time your

That's the point where I think you have really "hurt" the individual. In my opinion (admittedly inherited from my dad), a person has to have something to work for, a goal, a source of motivation (to do good work).

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Trust me...... I DO NOT condone this philosophy or practice for everyone. I myself do not want to be King. :) There is a great amount of responsibility that comes with that kind of power. And that is after all what weath is . . . Power... plain and simple.
--
Offered in the spirit of friendship and respect :)

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