OT: Man calls 911 over 28-year-old son's messy bedroom

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I don't even know where to start with this one:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090518/ap_on_fe_st/us_odd_messy_room_5
Contrast this with the thread about Leon's son maybe? LOL!
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Steve Turner wrote:

"The son, who also works as a political consultant, said he's lucky to be living in the house rent free. He also promises to keep his room clean."
...that's what they all say.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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wrote:

Morris, it sounds like you may be a little skeptical. I will say both my sons' rooms stay pretty clean. But, the last one moved out over 16 years ago which may have some bearing on that.
At 29, the son maybe ought to be thinking about his own place. I didn't live with my parents for more than a couple of months after high school.
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Tom Veatch wrote:

Heh - I was thinking more in the context of politicians and promises and mess-making and living off the efforts of others.

Yup - me too. By 26 I was in my own home and by 35 it was paid off (the guy I was working for told me doing that was "un-American").
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Morris Dovey
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I had to have my mother's name on the deed of my first house because I was only 20 when I bought it. I was able to get a mortgage myself though.
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Now there is a lot to say about that short story. First off, you have not seen my son's room, but he is only 21 and did study in there a lot. ;!)
The 28 year old "boy" in the story however seems to be true to form.
1. He is 28 years old and has a messy bedroom. 2. He is 28 years old and lives at home with mom and dad. 3. He is a school board member. 4. His father did not want to ruin his son's political career over the incident. 5. He is a political consultant.
My observations.
1. He has never, NEVER been kissed by a girl his age. 2. His father's only hope of boosting his son out of the basement is if he finds a way to get welfare..... uh er uh a, job in politics. 3. Should the IRS be informed that the dead beat son is earning some kind of living and living rent free?
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Is that against tax law down there inthe US of A?
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wrote:

I don't know if it would be in this particular case but if you are given a place to live for free, it is a taxable benefit.
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How does that work with a stay-at-home spouse?
Are they all tax cheats?
What about a teenager with a part-time job, living at home?
Tax cheat?
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It has to be a benefit in lieu of payment. Basically a benefit. If he is going to be a politician this perhaps could be construed as a contribution to his campaign.
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On Tue, 19 May 2009 06:42:05 -0500, "Leon"
Part of our tax confusion (U.S.) is that it's very doubtful that any single person does "know the infinite details".
I can certainly verify your earlier statement about benefits in lieu of payment being taxable. In college, during the late 1960's, I worked in the Women's Dining Hall for my meals. No cash changed hands, but that's where I met my wife. Every January, I'd receive a W-2 form from the university showing that the value of my meals had been reported to the IRS as taxable income. Of course, no withholdings had been made since there was no money involved. Cash from other sources had to be diverted to pay the taxes due.
I doubt the guy living at home would be subject to that particular little quirk unless he was somehow employed by his parents and receiving free lodging as payment for that employment. But, who knows, some of those infinite details might be applicable.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life. Robert A. Heinlein
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"Leon" wrote:

Offset by single person deduction.
Net sum zero.
Lew
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Only from your employer.
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wrote:

Only from your employer.
Yes, but with this situation it would not be a far stretch, him being a political advisor and a member on the board of education and seeking a political career, to some how have worked a deal to be compensated for housing by his employer.
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Charlie Self wrote:

The person giving the free place to live is taxed on the income that should have been paid.
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Are you talking about the gift tax? Then it is a reduction in the estate tax exception that has to be dealt with when the giver dies. Only then if the gift exceeds $13,000 in any given year. See http://www.fairmark.com/begin/gifts.htm
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Douglas Johnson wrote:

Doug;
No. It's a tax on earnings that would have been made had payment been made. Nothing to do with gifts.
Dave
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wrote:

Should have been paid by whom? People giving free shelter to others aren't taxed on that shelter gift that I've ever heard. This guy has just continued living at home. AFAIK, there's neither a law against it nor a tax on it.
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On Tue, 19 May 2009 10:57:36 -0500, "David G. Nagel"

Only if the lodging is part of employment and doesn't fall under other business expenses.
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Let's check in with Leon in another 5-6 years... with the current economy he may have the same problem! ;~)
John
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