OT:Letter to Southern Califonia newspaper that was not printed

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Doug Miller wrote:

He should also check the Brit record during the Boer war where Tommy machine gunned civilians, and penned survivors so closely without medical treatment or food or sanitation that thousands died. But, hey, what the hell, those damned Boers wanted to keep their own country instead of turning it over to businessmen for diamond mining and similar purposes.
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Graham Walters wrote:

How do they cover the "Black Hole of Calcutta" these days?

You mean in the American Colonies, right? Tie any Mamalukes to cannon lately?
The last I hear you had given up keel-hauling, and whipping around the fleet as well. Good.
--

FF


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Speaking of fact:
****************** It is important to note here that John Hanson was NOT the 1st President of the United states of America under the Articles of Confederation. This claim is a MYTH created by Seymour Wemyss Smith writing a book called John Hanson - Our First President in 1932. Samuel Huntington was installed as the 1st President of the United States on March 2, 1781 an official ceremony in Philadelphia. This 1st U.S. Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, was unanimously ratified by all 13 States on March 1, 1781 creating "The Perpetual Union of the United States of America." At that moment the Continental Congress ceased to exist and the United States of America in Congress Assembled assumed all federal power under the new U.S. Constitution.
Huntington only served as President of the United States until July resigning due to ill health. The United States in Congress Assembled elected Thomas McKean the 2nd U.S. and served until John Hanson was elected the 3rd President in November of 1781. President Hanson took the time to write an official Thanks of Congress to Thomas McKean for his services as President of the United States of America in Congress Assembled. This letter, which can be found in Chapter One of President Who? Forgotten Founders and is irrefutable proof that Hanson recognized at least one President of the United States in Congress Assembled serving before he assumed the unicameral chair.
*******************
On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 16:00:44 +0100, "Graham Walters"

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Seems odd that you do not mention th deliberate terrorism by commissioned officers in His Majesty's Army, carried out as a deliberate policy of the North administration.
--Banastre Tarleton, anyone?
Of course, that was merely a cntinuation of a century long poicy f the Crown to use terrorism, and even germ warfare, on any opponnts of Crown policy.
--- Lord Jeffrey Amherst, anyone?
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
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Apparently, you're not as smart as you think. http://www.snopes.com/history/american/hanson.htm

Ah, the irony.
todd
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Sorry my mistake, I was referring from memory.
John Hanson was the 3rd President of the United States, Samuel Huntington was the first, followed by Thomas McKean.
If you want to know about history, ask a historian.
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Apparently, your only problem isn't your memory. Since there was no "United States of America" until the ratification of the US Constitution in 1789, it would be difficult for Hanson (who died in 1783) to have been president of it. Perhaps you're confusing the alliance of the thirteen states formed under the Articles of Confederation with the United States of America. I suggest you get your history straight.
todd
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What do people think about the US dropping atom bombs on two japanese cities? These weren't military targets. Was that terrorism?
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The fact is, they were military targets. They were also, obviously, large population centers as well. The stated purpose of using the atomic bombs was to hasten an end to the war and avoid the losses on both sides that would have come with a presumed invasion of the Japanese main island. There's no way of knowing what would have actually taken place had the atomic bombs not been dropped.
And let's not delude ourselves into thinking that these were the only times that cities were targeted in war. According to Wikipedia, the total civilian deaths during WWII exceeeded 32 million.
todd
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You don't accept any of the arguments that we were showing our might to Stalin? Japan would have starved itself in short order without an invasion - an island nation with little natural resources for making war materials. They were running out of time once the allies recaptured most of the South Pacific, cut off major supply lines and knocking at their door.
Perhaps one can justify and accept the circumstances leading up to the first bomb dropped on Hiroshima. However, do we have as much standing to defend the second? Given that much of the communications infrastructure of Japan was in tatters, plus lacking modern methods of email, cell phones, satellites, etc - waiting merely 3 days before dropping on Nagasaki may have been rushed, unjustified and more illustrative of sending the Russians a message. They certainly were not our favorite allies and much distrusted. What if we had waited a full week? Did the Japanese submit a formal declaration that they intended to fight on no matter what we had done to Hiroshima?
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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wrote:

My point is that I don't know what would have happened. Maybe a million people would have starved to death if we just blockaded the island. Would that have been better?

Again, neither of us knows what would have happened had we waited a week. A lot of people would say that the Japanese started the "hot" war with us, and we finished it in the manner of our choosing. The fact that we had been engaged in a bloody war with Japan for well over 3 years probably didn't leave a lot good will toward the enemy at the time. It wouldn't even surprise me to learn that with the thinking of the time, the fact was that we had two nukes to drop and we were going to drop them both. As an aside, Kyoto was the choice of many as the primary target for the first bomb. The fact that Secretary of War Henry Stimson had spent his honeymoon there some time before and had an appreciation for the city is probably the only thing that saved it.
todd
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IIRC, we had eight or so more, at the time.
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The only info I find describes the Manhattan project as having produced three atomic bombs. Two plutonium bombs (one tested at the Trinity site and one dropped on Nagasaki) and a uranium bomb (dropped on Hiroshima). If there is documentation of addition weapons available at the time, please provide a link.
todd
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Stuff I've read said that there were only those three until August '45, but that one Pu bomb could be manufacturered every three weeks (U235 was too difficult to separate hence the reason for the Pu research in the first place). The Manhattan project wasn't just a research program, rather manufacturing.
--
Keith

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Keith Williams wrote:

Yes. The Manhattan project only produced three bombs because production was halted in August 1945. Components for a fourth were in transit to the Pacific theater at the time, and production was being ramped up to prduce several per month by the end of 1945.
--

FF


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Is there anyplace other than Rec.woodworking where you can find so many experts on atomic bombs?
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John wrote:

rec.aviation.military.
--

FF


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It depends on if you are talking about an appointed interim leader or a duly elected president.Who the British think the first president was means less to me than whether the cat has constipation or not.
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I don't agree; both have EQUAL meaning to me ;)
--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
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Nick Hull wrote:

I find the cat having constipation to be of greater concern--if he doesn't go soon then there's going to be a vet bill.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
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