OT - Let's Hear it for Global Warming!!

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Al Gore take note.
Kansas gets cold, but sub zero in the southeastern part of the state is unusual. Occasionally, we might see -1 or -3 and that is fairly rare (one or two times/year, if at all.) We make up for the really cold temperatures with wind.
Our next few nights are forecast in the -5 to -10 range. The cattlemen are busy and nervous.
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On 01/06/2010 04:47 PM, RonB wrote:

There is a difference between weather and climate.
Also, the world is bigger than just North America. 2009 was Australia's 3rd hottest year on record since 1910 (and the warmest winter on record). It was South Korea's 5th warmest since 1912. There are probably other similar stats but those were just the first couple hits I found.
Chris
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If the cold air is moving FROM the Arctic, could that warm the Arctic? Isn't that what Al Ghore is all in a tizzy about? You know, The Burj Dubai getting completely flooded <G>
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On 1/6/2010 5:58 PM, Chris Friesen wrote:

I believe if you will read the non algorian news you will find that the whole northern Hemisphere is experiencing the coldest weather on record. Record snows in America, Europe and in China.
The best part of the Global warming conference was the fact that obama had trouble getting back into the US because the airports were closed because of record snow falls.
I question any conclusion when some one tells me there is a 0.4 degree warming trend when at any given time the temperature variation across the total face of the earth on any given day is is over 100 degrees. Based on the precision of the average temperature measurements that is insignificant. If you know nothing else about statistic do the Student's T test on the data. In this data t = <0.1 to be significant it would need to be greater that 2.8. I suspect there would be that much variance (0,4 degrees)in the temperature with in a couple of hundred feet of any one temperature measurement point
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On 1/6/2010 5:56 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Uhh, uhm, Keith ... if you please, this is not science, this is politicoreligousity.
Please keep that in mind when introducing scientific reasoning and accountability into an AGW discussions.
The cabal thanks you ...
<there is no cabal>
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> Uhh, uhm, Keith ... if you please, this is not science, this is

When 95% of the world's climatologists agree on this I have to believe them. When 95% of the world's politicians agree on something, there's still room for doubt. Nantz
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Science does not operate by majority vote. Science operates by making a hypothesis, then testing it to see if it yields correct or incorrect predictions about the behavior of the real world.
There was a time when > 95% of the world's geologists believed that continents were fixed in place and did not move.
There was a time when nearly 100% of the world's population, scientists and otherwise, believed the earth to be flat.
If a position is based upon percentage agreement, it may be politics, it may be faith, it may be lunacy -- but it is not science.
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On 1/6/2010 7:02 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Absolute, pure, unadulterated .... PITHY!
Well said, Doug!!!
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On Thu, 07 Jan 2010 01:02:41 +0000, Doug Miller wrote:

Well, the Greeks certainly knew the Earth was round - one of them measured it :-).
You must be speaking of the Middle Ages. There were no scientists then, the church wouldn't allow it. There were some in Arab countries, but the only ones I know of were mathematicians. Someone who knows more about Arab science of those times can chime in here.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Doug Miller wrote:

It would appear the Flat Earth Society still has an active membership.
Lew
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On Wed, 6 Jan 2010 19:20:36 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

FS: one slightly used, but still entirely functional rectilineator.
Accepting offers.
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2010 20:33:44 -0700, Revivul

I'll trade two epicycles of Mars.
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And they are active in the global warming hoax, I bet.
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:-(
The forums at flatearthsociety.org make entertaining reading -- for a short time, at least. My tolerance for crazies is rather low, I'm afraid.
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Aristarchus, I believe it was, and came up with a remarkably accurate estimate, too, considering the measuring tools he had available to him.

And you must be restricting your viewpoint to Europe only. :-) Mariners knew for a long time that the surface of the earth is curved -- what other explanation can there be for the fact that you can see the masts of a distant ship long before you can see the hull? Non-sea-faring cultures, though, had no such reference points -- the earth is "obviously" flat, right?

Actually, the main reason science stagnated in the Middle Ages is that once the Roman Empire fell, *everything* stagnated.

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Doug Miller wrote:

The answer to the ship-mast question can easily be answered by positing a hill (of water) between the ships.
As to the conclusion "what other explanation can there be," ignorance of any other possibility is not a proof. Sherlock Holmes said: "If you eliminate all other possibilities, whatever is left must be the answer" is correct as far as it goes. The fact remains that one cannot eliminate all other possibilities. There always remain the cases of miracles, hallucination, lies, mistakes, and a host of others. Absence of evidence is not evidence of anything.
As for the earth being flat, it is if you're building a house, surveying a lot, plowing a field, laying out a road, building a railroad (except for the hills), and so on. Just like Newtonian mechanics are the ultimate truths for bowling, billiards, or shooting a scrot who breaks into your shed.
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On Thu, 07 Jan 2010 10:18:13 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

I can assure you that surveyors do take into account the curvature or the Earth because the distance between lines of longitude varies with the distance from the equator. I did surveying software back in the '70s and know whereof I speak :-).
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On 1/7/2010 12:32 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

If you live in the mid west you will find many slight jogs in the back roads where they cross township lines. These jogs will only be a couple of dozen feet. I have been told they were caused by the surveyors adjustment for he decreasing length of the longitude.
These slight jogs can be seen in most states in the mid west. They are easily found in those area that are flat like the area east of Fort Wayne Indiana. Use Google earth and trace the back roads north, you will see many of the jogs. (The main roads once also had these jogs, but years of improvements have removed them.
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Indeedy, doo...
Generally out here they apparently "saved up" over larger distances so most correction-line adjustments are quite a bit larger than 20-30 ft; more like 1/8-th or 16-th of a mile. I'd actually guess they were actually in a fixed number of chains or rods; I'd have to research what the standard measure was when this area (far SW KS) was surveyed.
And, on (B), they may have smoothed out or rounded off the square section-line corners, but even the US highways still have easily discernible correction-line jogs to this day (and likely will for quite a long time to come).
--
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

Correct. Surveyors DO take into account curvature. But not for "surveying a lot."
For small distances (say, surveying a section) the difference is undetectable. I did map creation back in the 60's for marine seismic surveys. For most surveys, up to about 100 miles or so, there was no discernable difference even when using different projections (Mercator, Universal Transverse Mercator, Lambert, etc.).
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