OT: just a suggestion

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email.me:

DSL = Digital Subscriber Loop. That meant something decades ago, but now DSL is just a name.
The difference between DSL and cable modem technolgies is that DSL is baseband - if you're sending 10Mbit of data, you have a 10Mbit signal on the wires. Cable modem uses a radio frequency carrier which is modulated with the 10Mbit signal. Both are analog technologies.
The problem with DSL is it's _very_ dependant on the quality of the connection it goes over. If you have fiber all the way to the house (very uncommon) you get excellent results. If you have twisted pair part of the way (the normal case) you get indifferent results - mostly because the twisted pair is usually ancient and in pretty crappy condition.
Now, as far as landline phones go, if the phone puts the voice signal directly on the wire, that is what's called "analog landline". If the phone converts the voice signal to digital data, and then sends it over either DSL or cable (where it's an analog signal) it's called "digital landline". If that digital data is additionally formed into IP packets and sent over the Internet, then it's called VOIP.
John
(who doubts anyone really cares about the technical side of phone lines...)
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John McCoy wrote:

Well, as for me, you were mistaken. Thanks for taking the time to try to educate us. Who wants to be computer network illiterate (CNI?) these days?
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

UVerse works on pure fiber, fiber to the node, or in some fring areas DSL multiplexing. It is not the same as ordinary single-line DSL.

No, it is a technology. People who don't know any better might call their cable connection "DSL" or their fiber optic connection "cable" but the people who install it certainly know the difference.

Nope. DSL has multiple 4.3 KHz carriers on adjacent bands going from somewhere between 10 and 100 KHz up to whatever limit the particular loop can carry. If it's carryine 10 Mb/sec it multiplexes that data over however many channels are required. But it's bloody rare for DSL to hit a speed that high.

The technology on which DSL is based.

I've never seen a DSL connection with phone service in which it is necessary to plug the phones into some kind of converter box in order to use them. The filters are needed to make the DSL work, not the phone, and they do not do signal conversion, they simply isolate the frequency bands.
DSL with phone uses analog phone service. There may be a repeater at the street that moves the CO closer to your location, but your connection is analog to the CO.
And why would a cable company use analog phone signalling? That would just add complexity to their system and tie up bandwidth that could be used for other purposes--you seem to have DSL and cable reversed in your mind.

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On 12/24/2015 2:52 PM, John McCoy wrote:

I have comcast triple deal, phone, internet and TV. We only have the LL because it's cheaper than with out it. We've had the same LL phone number forever, so we also for some ungodly, unknown reason, are attached to it. We rarely ever get calls other than salesman, politicians and so on and they are switched to an answer machine after two rings. I keep telling my wife not to answer the thing, everyone we know calls our cell phones, but she can't resist, which of course results in more calls.
I tried to use the PhoneTray thing-ee as it looked perfect for what I wanted, but it doesn't work with Comcast, it needs a voice modem. I was thinking of trying out a cheap voice modem, found a bunch for under $15, but not sure if that would work or not. Has anyone used something like this with Comcast? I have an old USRobotics Modem in my shed from the pre-internet days, but I don't think I want that answering calls, or maybe I do. Not sure I know what a "voice modem" is?
--
Jack
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Jack wrote:

For what it's worth, when I switched over to Tracfone, I took my landline number with me. One just has to wait a day or so for Comcast to release it (Tracfone will take care of the details). That said, I noticed yesterday that the price of Tracfone minutes has gone up 17% over the last few months. I'm still come out far ahead this way. If you spend a lot of time on your phone, your mileage may vary (but you can compute it in advance and see!)
Bill

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I haven't had a landline phone in almost a decade. We had a line once, because they refused to sell "naked" DSL (required a phone line) but there was never a phone attached to the line. About a year later they allowed us to drop the phone "service".

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On 12/24/2015 7:01 PM, krw wrote:

My daughter just switched from dish to comcast. They never owned a phone other than cell. She gets the comcast triple play as I do, because it cost MORE not to have the LL. Her phone line ends with nothing attached, nothing to ring. People under 40 have no use for old style phones, and neither do people over 40, but old habits are hard to break I guess. I probably should just disconnect my LL so no more salesmen, politicians etc. but for some dumb reason, we haven't been able to do it. When I say "we" I mean my wife.
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Jack
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I almost dropped the land-line. If it wasn't for AT&T's lack of signal where we live, I would have.
Actually, AT&T has this thing called something like "wireless home phone" or something like that. It's cellular in nature, but looks and feels like a home phone. They suggested that when I was making a few account changes.
Puckdropper
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On 12/26/2015 8:48 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

We dropped our landline a number of years ago. My wife and I each have a cellular phone with good signal strength at home.
We still liked the "convenience" or familiarity of the land line cordless phones so, after disconnecting from the grid, I installed a Siemens Gigaset Blue Tooth unit.
You connect the Gigaset to your house wiring and a wall wart for power. Once programmed, once you enter the residence with your cell phone the phone is automatically linked via Gigaset and you can make and receive your phone calls using either a traditional POTS hooked to the household phone wiring as in days of yore, or just use the cordless handsets.
The Gigaset we have is capable of simultaneous connection with three cellular phones and when you call out, you can select which cell phone you use for the call or let it default to the phone connected at position #1.
Siemens is not the only such device out there. Panasonic, in fact, makes a cordless phone set with this technology built in that you can use with either the regular wired landline and/or the cellular BT feature.
Really nice not having to carry the cell phone around with me in the house. If I'm out in the shop - separate building from the house - there's a cordless phone on the wall.
OTOH, what Puckdropper wrote about from AT&T (and Verizon Wireless offered a similar deal) requires you to pay a monthly fee to the carrier. Nuts! I paid about $60 for my Siemens unit. The carrier will sock you $20 a month or so for that convenience. LOL!
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On 12/26/2015 8:48 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

We have the ATT wireless phone. It is cellular and shows up like another cell phone on the ATT cell phone bill.
You get a cellular receiver that looks like a wireless modem and it plugs in to our cordless phone transmitter/message machine.
The ring is distinctly simple and no FAX.
The sound is as good as regular land line.
BUT with taxes, fees and so on it comes out to between $25~$26 per month and we are about to drop it as almost the only calls we get on it are from robots.
It is a good deal that works well but we don't need 3 phone numbers for 2 people.
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Yeah, my wife got tired answering politicians' robocalls so didn't fight when I wanted to dump the phone. I kept one in the kitchen drawer for a while if she felt she needed to call someone on a land line she could plug it in. ;-)
I still get political robocalls once in a while but usually for pols I couldn't vote for if I wanted (different state and I'm not an illegal).
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On 12/26/15 8:22 AM, Jack wrote:

I still have reason for it. I still like having 911 feature tied to my home address for one. But a couple more practical reasons for still having a "land line" is the lousy reception for cell phones around my house and the fact that cell phones are still too "walkie-talkie" for my taste in most cases. One person has to completely stop talking in order for the other to be heard. I don't know if this is a digital transmission thing or what, but with land lines and even the cable VOIP lines, you can still hear what's on the other line when speaking. That's very important for having a more natural discussion.
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On 12/26/2015 10:36 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

time and create all kinds of noise. LOL
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wrote:

Or a room full of women. ;-)
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-MIKE- wrote:

I thought the same thing as far as the sound quality. But suddenly everyone I was talking to over the landline was using a cell phone, so it became superfluous. My wife tells people (because she thinks its funny), " ... he doesn't carry it anywhere, not even around the house--he never even unplugs it!" Of course, that's not completely true...but it's mostly true. I even answer it less and less frequently (particularly, if I don't recognize the area code).
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wrote:

The lousy reception thing can be taken care of with a picocell. Basically, you have your own cell station that connects to "Ma" over the Internet. The "half-duplex" voice is certainly an issue with cell phones. 911 for home shouldn't be an issue though. They should be able to locate you, without any problems.
The cell phone issue that you didn't mention was disaster recovery. Cell phones aren't of much use if the tower loses power and their backup power isn't anything like the POTS COs of years gone by. OTOH, in many disasters, the cell system was the only communications that did survive.
If you want it all, I guess belt and suspenders is the way to go, though if you don't use things, they tend to not work when they're really needed.
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On 12/26/15 4:06 PM, krw wrote:

Silly me, I think if I'm paying for a service, the service should work without me having to buy extra stuff to make it work. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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wrote:

Well, you're paying for a mobile phone. If you want it to work at home, you may have to pay extra. ;-)
At least with Verizon, it's a one-time charge. They don't charge for the Internet->POTS connection. I think AT&T does the same.
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4ax.com:

These have always struck me as one of the greatest marketting feats ever: get people to use their own internet bandwidth, that they pay for, to compensate for inadequate service on the cell system that they're also paying for. Viola! They get to pay twice for one thing.
John
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2015 14:07:27 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

The alternative is for others to pay for cell coverage for your area, which doesn't have enough customers to pay the freight. It's part of the cost of living where others don't.
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