OT... Is it just me? Sand bags in the winter.

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When I had a rear-wheel drive, I used to carry one-gallon plastic jugs of cat litter (the ones you see in supermarkets). It added some weight and if I found myself stuck on ice somewhere, it made for an excellent traction mechanism (just pour it out). The one-gallon size made it easier to work with.
However ... cat litter does make a real mess if you get it on your boots and track it into the house. Stucco chips sound like they would have been a better option.
Heck .. we live in New Mexico now. We don't get enough ice down here to consider the problem anymore!
Jack
snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe wrote:

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winter?
easy
tires
them.<g>
Never heard of "stucco chips". What they hell are they normally used for? Here in CA we prefer our stucco on the walls. -- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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<<Never heard of "stucco chips". What they hell are they normally used for?>>
In this context, they are for when your car gets stucco in the snow and ice. You pour some in your tire tracks to get unstucco. <g>
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

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On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 10:03:24 -0700, "Pounds on Wood"

They are used in stucco as a finish. Between 1/8" and 1/4" sized white silica rock.
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 12:09:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe wrote:

Ya gotta understand that those californicators think that stucco is that plastic Dryvit crap not a cement based product with white stones in it ;-)
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Dryvit! Nonsense, builders in California only use it when forced by the architect to achive some specific design requirement. Remember, we don't have to grind rock to get sand. We prefer real stucco out West. (And we like our Mag 77's al well!)
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe wrote:

1) I never read what you wrote about them before.
2) I never heard of stucco chips before and have no idea where to get them, or what sort of dip to serve with them.
3) I live in MD now, but when I lived in NE Ohio I just drove through the snow and never worried about redistributing the weight.
--

FF


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Stucco chips are his name for decorative landscaping stones, about the size of a nickel, usually in come in bags at DIY stores. In this case, he prefers the white stones.
John
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They actually come is sizes as small as course sand. I would hate to see a house that was stuccoed with rocks the size of a nickel.<g> DIY places rarely carry the finer stucco chips. You need to go to a commercial concrete outfit for them.
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Last time I had a rear-wheel-drive car I kept 4 or 5 cinder blocks in the trunk during the winter.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

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I use them and they work great. I stack maybe four over each of the drive wheels. Only problem is, I can's see over the hood then. Maybe it is a better idea for RWD vehicles.
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wrote in message

Harrumph! In my earlier days, carried two or three old tombstones in the trunk of my '53 Chev.(grandad was sexton for our country cemetery and they were old ones that had been replaced). Carried a toolbox or a couple concrete blocks in the front end of my '62 Corvair just to help keep the front end glued down so I could steer it in the winter. Only time I ever got it stuck was showing off, tried driving over/through a ridge of plowed snow in a parking lot, got high-centered and had to drag enough snow out from under the car to get the wheels back on the ground! Later on had (4) 50lb. Otis elevator test weights, about 8" x 8" x 6" steel with a built in handle, in my '64 Falcon Sprint. More recently, (5) 70lb. tubes of "traction grit". They fit nicely between wheelwells in my 2WD p/u, and if really necessary open them and spread some very nice sharp cornered traction aid. Between those and snow tires, if I can't get where I'm going, got no business going there!
--
Nahmie
The greatest headaches are those we cause ourselves.
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I had one too, Monza with the 4 speed. Great car in snow. I had 7.00 x 13 tires and it just went anyplace. Yes, I had a toolbox in the trunk too.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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YEP! Loved that little car. Loved it even more after I put hotter plugs in it so they didn't foul so much in city/winter driving. Threw the belt a time or three, just put it back on & go. It would, however, religiously burn up a set of points every 9K miles. Intended to go with a CD ignition , but traded it first.
--
Nahmie
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Drove a Pontiac LeMans during college. It was absolutely the worst car on snow or ice you could find. I was one of those people that other cars had to drive around because anything over 35 on any amount of snow caused fishtailing. OTOH, when the roads were dry, that 350 V8 was awesome!
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Up until the Corvair, I think the best snow car I ever drove was my Mother's '53 Chev 6 w/Powerslide tranny. Only 2 gears, but if it was really slick, step on it enough to pick wheel speed up so it would shift into high, then it would walk right along. Just enough torque to keep going, not enough to break the wheels loose. We won't talk about it's wimpy dry road performance.
--
Nahmie
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I made several sand bags from old cotton jeans legs. Placed on the lower lathe shelf it provides added stability and excellent vibration dampening. I have also used the sand bags to weigh down glued up parts--it works well for unusual shapes as well as sandwiched ply sheets.
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On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 21:06:53 +0000, Phisherman wrote:

Do you line the bags with plastic? I'm keen on making such sandbags, but it seems the sand would leak through the denim. We're talking worn-out jeans here; they get a little thin. And no, I wouldn't use the leg with the hole in the knee!
Do you tie or stitch them closed?
--
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vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Pick up a couple pair at Salvation Army - get exactly the size you need for sandbags. Machine sew the legs closed with several rows of stitching.
Josie
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On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 20:47:03 -0400, Jois wrote:

SA? I just look in my closet!
Thanks for the info on construction.
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