OT: Internet call for Swingman

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OK now, reading another post I realized I missed something valuable here. Swingman, all I could find in a Google search about your microwave roux was the reciped you posted about 3 - 4 years ago. Have you changed/improved/modified that over the old recipe? (Someway I missed the original as well.)
I picked up the old gumbo reciped you posted at the same time as the micro roux and will be trying that out soon. I am really interested as I have found a couple of great sausages lately that deserve some good treatment: Kountry Boy's beef and pork made in Brenham, TX (good stuff if you pierce it and drain it) and Tony Cachere's beef and pork.
Both seem to be crying for my big pot. If you don't save me those poor sausages could be heading for a more traditional German fare of boiled cabbage/greens with bacon and caraway soup. Good stuff, but not good gumbo. No apologies to any Germans out there, I come from a longgggg line of schnitzel makers. OK, mostly eaters. And beer drinkers.
Although I cook a lot and like to do it, the gumbo I have made in the past has been a real labor of love due to the time to make a proper roux. I have never heard of a shortcut. I don't mind chopping and cutting, but an hour and a half in front of the stove stirring constantly to get that deep dark chocolate color is a bit much for me.
So... how about it. Gotta a new recipe for micro roux or is the old one still the one? I am thinking of all the gravies and sauces that could benefit from this if I could get the hang of a micro roux. Around the holidays I use enought roux that I have made it and stored it in the past so that I can make an instant gravy or sauce as needed.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
> If you don't save me those poor > sausages could be heading for a more traditional German fare of boiled > cabbage/greens with bacon and caraway soup.
OK, ya got me.
Fried cabbage with crisp bacon pieces is a specialty of mine, but have never tried boiled cabbage unless it was in some type of soup.
What is the recipe?
Lew
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It's not terribly difficult. Put a modest amount of salted water in a deep pot, and bring it to a boil. Toss in a quartered, rinsed head of (white or red) cabbage, with the core removed, and steam until softened. Drain. Sprinkle toasted caraway seeds over it, a bit of salt, maybe a little vinegar, and eat it with your favorite piece of pork.
Lots easier than anything epoxy. (g, d & r...)
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:
> It's not terribly difficult. Put a modest amount of salted water in a deep > pot, and bring it to a boil. Toss in a quartered, rinsed head of (white or > red) cabbage, with the core removed, and steam until softened. Drain. > Sprinkle toasted caraway seeds over it, a bit of salt, maybe a little > vinegar, and eat it with your favorite piece of pork.
Sans pork, that's the start of Pigs In The Blanket.
(No toothpicks allowed)
Lew
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Hey, we always wrapped ours in a dough. Cabbage would be good, too.
I'm off to the store!
Patriarch
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Here's an old post, Robert ... I still make the roux the same way:

Woodshop Chicken/Sausage Gumbo
3 Lb chicken (old hen is best, boneless/skinless is fine) 3 Lb Smoked Sausage (venison'll do if you've got it) 2 Lb Cut Okra (frozen is fine)
Chop the following and season well before adding to the pot:
2 Large Onions 2 Large Bell Peppers 1 Large bunch Celery 1 Large bunch Parsley 2 bunches Green Onion tops (reserve a tee bit for garnish)
Salt, black pepper, Garlic powder, cayenne pepper to taste (if you can get it, Tony Chachere's "Cajun Seasoning" will work just fine)
1 cup Roux (make it, or buy it in a jar at the store ... made is better, but store bought works)
Make it easy on yourself and make your roux in the Microwave as follows:
1 cup flower mixed with 1/2 cup of cooking oil in a round bottom Pyrex dish. Cover and Microwave on high for about 15-20 minutes, stirring EVERY minute after the roux starts to turn color. Watch it closely, the darker the roux, the stronger and darker the Gumbo ... I take mine to a dark chocolate color, almost black ... but don't burn it! It doesn't take long, so if you do, start over.
Note: the roux will continue to darken a bit after you take it out of the Microwave. Be careful with it at this stage, because it is super heated and can burn you. I often stir in a handful of the chopped vegetables to the roux at this point to get that dark, shiny roux, but watch that it doesn't spit back at you if you do.
Fill a 12 quart stock pot about half full of water, put it on high heat and while it is coming to a boil add the roux and chopped vegetables, stirring it up well to meld the roux with the water. Bring back to a boil. Season the broth, add the chicken and sausage, bring to a boil again, then turn down the heat to medium and let simmer until the chicken is done ... a couple of hours simmering on low heat will bring out the flavor.
Serve over cooked white rice (NOT converted rice!), garnished with some reserved green onion tops.
Gumbo File can be added while it is cooking (authentic), or to thicken it a bit when it is served.
There is no law that says you can't add shrimp, crab meat, oysters to the above, individually by species, or all at the same time. However, there is a law that states that if you put tomatoes in gumbo you lose your Certified Coonass papers and have to move to Arkansas, a place where condiments, and educational materials, are not allowed!
<<
That nothing has changed, certified by taste test 12/6/06.
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Swingman wrote:

Anyone who puts tomatoes in gumbo or chili should be shot!
Fred
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Fred wrote:

GASP!!! That's like water in scotch! Parmesan on putanesca! A bra on Venus De Milo! A trailer hitch on a 911 Turbo Carrera! Stop me! Now!
r--->who will try Swingman's gumbo recipe over the holidays...for sure.I love a good gumbo.
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Robatoy wrote:

be from Louisiana (and know that you don't pronounce it Louise-ee-ana) or at least know where Loozyana is.     jambalaya,     jo4hn
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jo4hn wrote: [schnipferized]

Hibachi! (That's Japanese for "what's cooking!")
HOLD the bus there young fella! The Louisiana shores have been awash with Canadjun interbreeding, (aka Cajun) aka Acadian (Cajun) French: voulez vous les crayfishies? Crawdads? Parlez vous Zydeco? (That stems from: Pardonnez moi, are you zy deco(rator)?) Gumbo was invented by this fellow:
http://www.nonstick.com/sounds/Pepe.gif
Next to Molson and Labatt, Pepe is a national hero. Of course I love gumbo and jambalaya! It is mandatory! Upon close listening, most Celine Dion songs are about crayfish... or something fishy... maybe a tribute to an old hen?
Ooooooo and I love catfish too. La poisson du pussy, as we call it here.
r
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I thought that was Japanese for Green Power Tools.. :~)
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*Hearty laugh* Very nice, Leon. But you-know-what? I'm getting some feedback from folks out in the field that this new Hitachi stuff is really good stuff! Is it pretty? Maybe not. Does it work? Apparently.
(Been a huge fan of the M12V. I have three now. The oldest feels best. Great strength. With a two-flute 1/2" bit, I drop it through an entire slab of Corian and take out a template with NO hesitation. Almost Stradivarius-like.
I have yet to find ONE review which finds fault.
PS. If I find ONE slice of my opinion captured by Hitachi or like-minded web-sites, I will sue.... if used without my permission. *Giggety*
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Lew -
First let me tell you that I live in an area of Texas that supports a large community of German and Polish folks. There is a lot of fun ribbing and beer drinking between all of us, and of course any opportunity to have sausage eating and beer drinking together, we do it. The similarities in our eating habits have certainly not escaped any of us.
We have the Wurstfest (sausage) celebration every year in New Braunfels, Chilispiel, Bergesfest, and on and on all year. So we have all manner of sausage everything. The blending of regional recipes was inevitable, so I don't really think this is anything too traditionally German.
I picked up this recipe about 35 years ago when I was going out with a girl who had grandparents that literally spoke English as a second language, their first being German. Both of their parents (her >great< grandparents) literally "came over on the boat" aroud the turn of the century and moved to the country to farm with the large German community that was here by that time.
What an accent her grandparents had... it was a delight to hear Opa and Oma speak. It was better still to go up there for a family get together and drink beer, play horseshoes and eat.
Anyway, Opa never made his concotion the same way twice, and that was something he was always proud of when everyone was over. He measured little, and learned how to make it by eye from his father and mother. This is his basic recipe, and I have found it similar to a lot of others, so doctor it up any way you like. If you make this, bake a big pan of cornbread to go with this (jalepenos optional) and you will think you have gone to heaven.
******************************
In a 6 qt stock pot, fill it half way with water and add about 1/2 tablespoon of salt.
Add to the water ham bones, shanks, cooked ham shank bones, whatever is on hand that has a little meat on it, smoked of course is better. (I smoke a few hams a year and always save the bones for this and/or collards.) Add about a 1/2 cup of onion and 1/2 cup of celery, and boil covered bones, etc. for about 30 minutes
Remove bone and throw it away
While you are boiling the bone, cut up as much sausage as you like - for me, usually about 2 lbs or so, and brown in a pan. Drain off the excess grease.
In the pan with the remaining grease, brown (to toasty) 1/2 cup onions and set aside
Take a large head of white cabbage cut into 1" strips, coring out the center as you go
After you have thrown away the bone, add your cabbage to the pot. For color, I usually take the vegetable peeler and peel of about 1/2 of a large carrot into the mix
After the cabbage has cooked for about 20 minutes (cooking down but barely starting to get done) you should add enough chicken or beef broth to get it to about 2/3 full in your pot. Then add two 12 oz dark beers, the cooked sausage, the browned onions, and one heaping tablespoon of caraway seeds and 1/2 teaspoon of fresh ground black pepper
With all your liquids and ingredients you should be about 1 1/2 to 2 inches below the rim of your stockpot. Adjust liquid level as needed with more beer, stock or if desperate.... water
Simmer for 20 minutes, covered until the cabbage is cooked. You don't want the sausage to fall apart, nor the caraway seeds to lose their taste. Add salt to taste before serving
Somewhere in the cooking process, he used to cook up some extra crispy bacon, and sprinkle chopped bits of it on top of a steamy bowl of this stuff (never in the pot) just before serving.
************************************
This stuff is really rich and filling, and like so many of these dishes, even better the second day. Sometimes I put some fresh parsley in it, maybe more black pepper, and have even enjoyed some browned potatoes stirred in at the last. Even some destemmed Georgia collards mixed in when cooking the cabbage. But this is the basic recipe.
Whaddaya think?
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Can relate to both.
Was married to a Polack for a lot of years, my maternal grandfather emigrated from Prussia, my maternal grandmother from Heslot.
Today, both are part of Germany.
My mother, who will be 102 if she makes it till April, learned English at school, but had to speak German at home.
Guess people are always close to their mother tongue.

At one time, would get about 100 lbs of pork butts at Christmas & Easter, then bone them out and stuff in casings to make Kielbasa.
Still make my own Italian sausage when I feel like it.

That's called talent and self confidence these days.

<snip cabbage soup recipe details>

I like it.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
This is one you may like.
I adapted it from Emeril's recipe.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Famous Recipes From The Sloped Galley And Warped Mind Of Lew Hodgett
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Recipe: Lew's Smothered White Beans (Adapted from E Lagasse)
Yield: 6 Qts
Ingredients:
1 Lb Sliced bacon, cut into 1" pieces 1-2 Whole Spanish Onion, cleaned and chopped 4-6 Stalks Celery, cleaned and chopped 2 Bay leaves 1 Lb Smoked sausage of choice, cut into 1/2" slices 2-3 Whole Ham Hocks 1 Bud Garlic, cleaned and chopped 1/2 Cup Flour 1 Lb Small white bean of choice (ie: White, Navy, etc) 8-10 Cups Water Hot sauce of choice Salt and fresh ground pepper
Directions:
Soak and Clean beans over night per instructions. Rewash beans next day. In an 8 Qt stock pot, slowly brown bacon until crisp.
Remove bacon, add flour grease and drippings to make a dark brown roux.
Add onions, celery and sausage and sweat for about 5 minutes.
Add bay leaves, bacon, garlic ham hocks, and beans.
Cover with water, season with salt, pepper and essence. Bring the liquid up to a boil and reduce to a simmer.
Cook for about 2 hours or until beans are soft and creamy.
Stir the pot frequently the last hour or so to eliminate sticking.
Reseason with salt, pepper.
Remove bay leaves, ham hock fat, skin and bones.
Add hot sauce a few minutes prior to serving.
NOTE: Don't be too quick to serve. The beans should be starting to break down from the cooking process and not be firm.
Serve as a side dish along with corn bread.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
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Lew Hodgett wrote:
SNIP

I laughed my ass off at that one. Around Christmas/New Years, the best deer hunting happens around here. So that meant butcher a pig, butcher the deer, fire up the smoke house (10'X10') and ice down a cooler or two of beer. To them the beer was as important to making sausage as the meat was, and it may not have been possible to make sausage without the proper lubrication.
All the family males of all ages would gather (at least the ones that wanted sausage and dried beer sticks!) to make sausage link sausage, deer jerky, pan sausage, and >>drink like hell<<. Mountains of meat would be mixed in ice chests with all the spices added and mixed in, and then it was stuff the casings and hang the meat. Careful, cool fires of mesquite and oak were started in the smoke house and the project was in full swing.
After cleaning up, lots more beer was drunk, and then invariably, some pan sausage was cooked up. Too much of that green sausage can sure cramp you up... wow do I remember that. When they said "just one piece" they meant it. They about laughed themselves to death when I told them about the severity of the cramps when I saw them the next time. I never did live that one down.
I like the bean soup recipe. It looks like a winner and I would like to try it with the white beans as opposed to all the recipes from around here that use pintos. And anything with ham hocks, bacon and onion HAS to be good, right? Just wondering though, does the bacon completely dissolve when you cook it that long?
Thanks -
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
> To them the beer was as important to making sausage as > the meat was, and it may not have been possible to make sausage without > the proper lubrication.
So what else is new?
> Careful, cool > fires of mesquite and oak were started in the smoke house and the > project was in full swing.
Living where I did, smoking was not possible.
> It looks like a winner and I would like > to try it with the white beans as opposed to all the recipes from > around here that use pintos.
Makes a difference, I use navy beans when possible.
> And anything with ham hocks, bacon and > onion HAS to be good, right?
Absolutely.
You can believe the number of recipes I make that start out with rendering down a pound of bacon followed by sliced onions, diced celery, etc.
> Just wondering though, does the bacon > completely dissolve when you cook it that long?
You still have pieces left. They are just soft.
Lew
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wrote in message

Oh, I have no doubt that the new design of the Hitachi tools has not affected quality. I just look at it and wonder if what I am looking at is a switch, lever, knob or just a spot designed to catch your eye that actually has no purpose.
I noticed in the past couple of weeks that the LI battery versions of Panasonic and Makita are following the Tennis Shoe look.
Now if DeWalt would make their RAS look this way it should look like an alien space ship. LOL.
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Swingman wrote:

Thanks - this looks great. I know my SO will be interested in this as she likes gumbo even more than I do.
Robert
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"Swingman" wrote in message wrote in message

Robert, if you still have my e-mail, give me a holler. Have a proposition for some firsthand gumbo experience. ;)
Tried your e-mail addy above, but it bounced.
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I tried your "quicky etoufee" on last thursday night....
Me and the madame were blown away by how quick and how simple that receipe produced very eatable results....
damn tasty....
We done added this to the family collection.
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