OT?: HELP-Restoring/rewiring an Old Bench Grinder

I'm trying to restore/resurrect an Old Black&Decker Bench Grinder. (I'm guessing from the 50's or 60's.) The bearing seem sound. The arbor spins smoothly. However, there are a couple issues I need your help/advise on:
One, it is slow starting and some time goes backwards for a moment or two. It seems to try to get going and some times does, sometime doesn't.
Second, there is a short somewhere in the wiring. The original switch was replaced with a wall light switch. The screws holding the switch to the base were "insulated" with rubber washers. The screws are "live" (I can draw an arch from them to a ground!) This is the first item I will correct.
Questions:
Can I use a standard household light switch for this?
Any help/suggestions as to wiring the switch (The motor has 2 unmarked wires). I was planning on using a 3 wire grounded replacement cord and wiring the ground wire to the base. However, I am looking for help on the switch. in.
Do the two issues sound related?
Any suggestions as other repair solutions?
Thanks for the advice!
Brian
Remove NOSPAM from the E-Mail address if you want to respond via E-Mail
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you believe that this motor is still good except for the things indicated, I would take it to the nearest motor repair place and let them give you an estimate on repair. As with many things that are run by electricity you must be careful. You may get it going good again, but they will get it going correctly and then you could depend on it for a long time. I know , I know you want to fix it yourself, but sometimes the experts are the right way to go. Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.