OT Health Care

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wrote:

Some areas of the US will "forgive" college loans in return for a specified number of years serving in an area with insufficient doctors.
Maybe that's something you can steal from us? ;-)
John
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Cooniedog wrote:

Two observations:
* My GE rep tells me there are more MRI machines in Seattle than there are in all of Canada - and Seattle is not known to be the MRI capitol of the hemisphere. I shudder to think how many MRI machines there are in my town, Houston, what with 28 hospitals and two medical schools on just one medical center campus.
* My internist tells the story of a lab tech at his residency hospital in Chicago. Her mother, a Canadian, suddenly went blind. Inital tests revealed a tumor on the optic nerve. The CHS denied any further treatment, but would pay for a nursing home. In other words, they looked at a chart: 79-year old woman, brain cancer. Nope. No-can-do.
The tech told that story to a Neurologist on staff and he said that malady is fairly common, that the tumor is probably benign, and that removing it was a 30-minute procedure (they do it laproscopically through the nasal passage). Further, he said if momma could get to Chicago, he'd do the procedure for free.
The tech fetched mom to Chicago, and the tumor was removed on an out-patient basis. Mom could see again and the total bill was about $5,000 for the hospital facilities.
Point is, in the CHS they have benefit-to-cost ratio charts that deterine, in many cases, the course of treatment.
Couple of other observations:
* We hear that medicines are cheaper in Canada. That's generally true with two exceptions: 1) While brand names may be cheaper (Plavix, Zantax, etc.), generics are often more expensive. 2) Some medicines are NOT in the Canadian formulary. The government refuses to dispense them because of cost when alternatives are available even though the alternatives are not quite as effective.
* Abortions are free in Canada, but there is an eleven-month waiting list (It's a JOKE, son.).
* The survival rate for many chronic diseases (breast cancer, for example) is MUCH greater in the U.S. than in Canada.
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HeyBub wrote:

http://www.rosswalker.co.uk/tv_sounds/sounds_files_20081223_9801173/looney_toons/foghorn_thats_a_joke_x.wav
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Not really many, breast cancer survival is one of the very few health indicators where the US is near the top. In almost all other health indicators you may want to pick, Canadian outcomes are better, as are other countries. The US is at the bottom of rich countries when it comes to life expectancy and infant mortality. Some third world countries like Cuba and Costa Rica do almost as well as the US.
If you want to see actual data on a number of indicators, you can go to the World Health Organizations web site where they have data on most countries and look at how the US compares to other countries.
http://apps.who.int/whosis/data/Search.jsp?countries =[Location].Members
The figures for the CONCORD study show that the US had the second best breast cancer survival rate in the world in the late 80s-early 90s and Canada was number 3, but they were pretty close. However, blacks in the US had considerably lower survival rates. What some people don't like to point out is that the No. 1 country in terms of breast cancer survival rates is that pesky commie island to the south of Florida. Yup, Cuba.
For a news story, see:
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20080716/cancer_statistics_080716?hub=MSNHome
For a copy of the original CONCORD study http://www.theglobeandmail.com/v5/content/pdf/CONCORD.pdf
A more recent study comparing Ontario & California in the late 90s early 21st Century, high and middle income Americans seems to be below Canada, although not statistically significant. However, lower income Americans had much lower survival rates. You can see this paper at:
http://www.uwindsor.ca/users/g/gorey/KevinGorey.nsf/831fc2c71873e46285256d6e006c367a/84830734438db38b852572c20063b93c /$FILE/AnnEpidemiol2009.pdf
So as long as theyre not black and/or poor, American women with breast cancers live about the same time as Canadian women.
Luigi
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wrote:

Not really many, breast cancer survival is one of the very few health indicators where the US is near the top. In almost all other health indicators you may want to pick, Canadian outcomes are better, as are other countries. The US is at the bottom of rich countries when it comes to life expectancy and infant mortality. Some third world countries like Cuba and Costa Rica do almost as well as the US. ========================================================== Including the Insured in the US?
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LD wrote:

Be careful with statistics like those--some countries count an infant that dies within an hour of birth as a stillbirth for example, that doesn't count against either life expectancy or infant mortality, while the US counts such deaths as infant mortality.
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You are quite correct in pointing out that we have to be careful with the source of statistics. In this case, the WHO has fairly strict definitions about what they mean and how countries should collect and measure them. See: http://www.who.int/whosis/indicators/compendium/2008/en / for the details on all the indicators.
In the case of infant mortality, the definition is quite clear:

So if countries follow the WHO guidelines, then the definition is the same as in the US.
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wrote:

Be careful with attribution ...
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LD wrote:

Health care improvement in Cuba was the number one project of Castro during the cold war and was subsidized by the USSR. Under Castro Cuba's medical system became world class. Since the demise of the USSR, and the loss of it's funding, Cuba still has top notch medical care but it has become a two tier system of those wealthy enough to afford treatment and those that are not.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Here's a ranking chart: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2102rank.html
Much of the discrepancy depends on how you count. When a VERY premature baby is born in the US, enormous efforts are undertake to keep it alive. Tragically, many of these efforts fail and the resulting death is counted as "infant mortality."
In some countries, the one-kilo baby is discarded and tabulated as "stillbirth."
Another point is this, the US is an extremely diverse country. Very many races, educational and income levels, ethnic communities, varied languages, differing traditions and associations, disparities in incomes, weather, and support facilities. A problem of enormous impact in one community (say gang-warfare in black ghettos) affects the average for the entire country.
If you take the health-care statistics for a homogeneous country - like Germany or Haiti - and obtain the statistics for a similar ethnic/income/education group in the U.S., I predict the results will favor the U.S.
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I have rarely heard of long waiting lists in Canada except when Americans tell the story.If you have aggressive cancer or some other deadly illness your in the hospital right now.Only reason I can see causing waiting lists is lobbyists from the States trying to get some in power in our Gov. to take payoffs and force us towards private care. Not going to happen. Would be a great thing if it happens in America But Republican taking payoffs from health care lobbyists and some of the not well informed buying there talking points"Long line ups" "Can't chose your own Dr." "be afraid" "Iraq has nuclear weapons". If your American just don't get sick or hurt, Me I'll just rely on the great Canadian healthcare system.

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Cooniedog wrote:

I know of several Canadians that are snow birds that travel from Canada to the LA area for the winter. They also scheduled any operations, medical procedure for the time they are in LA. The Canadian health care system pays for it and they get it done in a timely manner. I should think this speaks for itself.
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I have heard of no-one doing that as Canadian healthcare will not pay for it unless it is an emergency. I would conceder that an outright lie lol. Keep throwing stuff out there some of it might stick. If it was true woot woot still better than being denied medical treatment cause your CEO wants a bigger boat.
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Rusty wrote:

Well, now you have heard, so it must be true!!!!!!!!!!
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think
Don't know who told you this, but it's common knowledge that the Canadian medical industry fights tooth and nail to have all paid for medical treatment done here in Canada.

for it

There may be some exception to the rule in effect here, but it's notoriously difficult to get Canadian authorized medical treatments out of country. It makes sense too, since the Canadian medical industry profits are zero with such treatments. Not that it never happens, just that it' very uncommon. I believe the closest one might come to such a service is if it's considered a dire medical necessity and covered under travel insurance.
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wrote in message
Upscale??Rusty didn't wrote

" procedure for the time they are in LA. The Canadian health care

Rusty did write this lol more careful editing please

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British health care is a bit of a joke in Britain.
I twisted my knee skiing and was having problems walking back in March.
My Doctor, part of our National Health Service, has made an appointment for me to be 'assessed' for physio-therapy. Still waiting to find out when they will decide if I need physio or not!!
My physio-therapist, charging 36 a visit and having seen me now 6 times, thinks I need two more visits for treatment as long as I keep up with the exercise regime he has laid down.
Having paid into the National Health Service all my working life (over 40 years) my first point of call when I need any treatment is the private sector, be it chiropractor, physio, dentist, or even Traditional Chinese Medicine. So I pay twice for all my medical needs.
Latest scam by our illustrious government is to get people to call into their local chemist shop (I believe you call them pharmacies) where trained staff can deal with them, thus keeping them away from a very overstretched Health Service.
If you are over here don't get ill, or if you do go to Europe for a couple of days and get some really efficient service.
--
Alan
Retired
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