OT: Have we become that stupid ..

Page 4 of 16  

[...]

Maybe it could be shifted some way inland; consider Hamburg/Germany for example where a major port is 100 miles from the sea, although that has it's own problems, of course.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Juergen Hannappel wrote:

The Mississippi R isn't conducive to navigation by large vessels very far upstream owing to extremely strong currents among other things...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you not consider Memphis TN not far up stream?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Barge and reasonably sized, but not really large.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Knothead wrote:

I have to ask, just where the hell do you live where there are no natural disasters?
It's one thing to build in a flood plain, I'll agree that's stupid but there are a half dozen or more entire (or nearly entire) states in Tornado Alley, and an equal number of entire states vulnerable to hurricanes.
Throw in most of the West Coast which is at risk for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and what you have left of the US is at risk for blizzards.
Sheesh.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Poking my nose into this thread - I live in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which just happens to be an area in the US where few if any natural disasters ever occur, at least not to the magnitude one thinks of when the term "Natural Disaster" is used. We're at 5000' above sea level and not much of anything happens here with respect to disasterous weather.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ROFL!
About 10 years ago I was in Seattle when a mild earthquake occured. The local TV stations went into high-alert mode, with several hours of broadcasting that went something like:
"And now, over to Steve near the Sea-Tac Airport. Steve, any damage there?"
"Nothing, Ken. Everything is completely normal."
"Okay. We'll be back to Steve in a little while for an update. So far, there is absolutely no reported damage... wait, we have a report from Connie in downtown Seattle. Connie?"
"Ken, I'm at 'Hair Affair' haiir salon near the market, and as you can see behind me, several bottles of hair care products have been shaken from their shelves and are laying on the floor."
"Thanks for that update, Connie."
"No problem, Ken."
etc...
--
Life. Nature's way of keeping meat fresh. -- Dr. Who

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Piss off already... I was taking a drink of juice when I was reading your post... now WHO is going to clean up this mess?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FEMA better do it damnit!
SteveP.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

electronic equipment up so it wouldn't hit the floor. And the reporting was particularly lame. I went around and talked to people for a few days afterwards about their earthquake experiences. I heard a lot of things that were much better than what got onto the news.
Two interesting stories from that earthquake.
A wine distributor talking about north and south versus east and west. It turns out that wine put onto shelves oriented in one direction stayed on the shelves. Wine in the other direction all jumped onto the floor. Hardly sensational, but an interesting fact and photos. (A sticky mess to clean up.)
The funniest one was a guy getting a physical. The doc was taking his blood pressure. The earthquake hit and his blood pressure spiked. The doc mentions this to his patient. The guy yells that an earthquake is happening. The doc looks up and says, "Oh, I didn't notice. Maybe we will wait a few moments and do this again." Now there is a doc who is either really focused on his work, or oblivous to his environment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was in a store near the Pike Place Market when it hit, and my first thought was "logging truck going by" before I realized the odd of a logging truck in that particular location was slim.
The bottles in the cooler wobbled slightly. I bought a 6-pack and walked back to the hotel to watch the (non) coverage.
You must have been closer to the epicenter than I.
I remember thinking that I wanted to see "Almost Live" cover it. Now that would have been funny! The local coverage would have made the "Lame LIST!"
It would have made a great bit for "Mind Your Manners, with Billy Kuan"...
--
Life. Nature's way of keeping meat fresh. -- Dr. Who

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Got to agree, but...most of those are local guys, and yesterday evening there was a doozy from New Orleans: guy driving along in a foot or so of water, all of a sudden is nose down and sinking. Another guy wades over and helps him out the car window just as said car disappears. Driver to news type: "I just didn't see the water."
Is it any wonder that some newspeople figure their audience is made up of those with less than fully functioning thinking gear?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Geeeze Swing ... didn't think you had to ask that one. Oh ... retorical question. Gotcha. Lucky for you, it's my week to answer retorical questions if I feel like it.
The two items you mentioned (hurricane reporting and Disfunction Junction ... er ... American Chopper) are absolutely related, because that's what most people watch. When they watch, the advertisers pay a great deal of money to whoever is producing the show (be it Discovery Channel, The Weather Channel, CNN or your local television station).
The intent of commercial television is not education or enlightment ... the intent is to make money, LOTS of money (hence the name commercial television). That's why PBS is having such difficult times ... their charter is about education and enlightment, and most people don't want that.
Once you understand this, the rest is pretty obvious. To make more money, you put on whatever crap is cheap to produce (more profits), requires little or no scripting (let's not confuse our audience), and laugh all the way to the bank (while crying how hard this job really is).
The really sad part is that people watch other's misery for enjoyment ... whether it is having all you own destroyed by a storm, or watching people having endless arguments ... this is called "drama" by the producers. The viewers then use this "drama" as a sociatal model and practice what they see ... the endless "in your face" crap that's all around us. The tale of the Klown Hammer pretty well states it: "an idle meaness ... ".
I don't know what this is called ... and quite frankly I don't care. You can add in all the "talk" shows, court shows, reality shows and the daily car chase shown live in LA ... all are about as deep as a a coat of polyurathane on a piece of stainless steel (and about as useful).
I may just switch my working hours to avoid "prime time television" completely ... and spend more time in the television-less shop. Now THAT is a concept I like.
Regards,
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, PBS is commercial no matter what they say. Our CT station was j ust noted as an organization dedicated to fund rasing that happens to runs some TV shows. Most shows are not interupted by commercials, but they start with five minutes of them, like "Chevy is funding part of TOH" while the truck is backing up to the gate, etc. The cable channels are showing stuff that is reaching the equivilent of what PBS used to have as a foundation. Discovery, TLG, History Channel are tough competition for them.

OK, that is correct.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

I quit supporting PBS a few years back when the local station returned my check for $25 with a note that their minimum donation was $35.
How's that for stupidi... er, shooting yourself in the foot?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 15:01:30 GMT, "Rick M"
[snip]

Enlightenment?
I used to be a regular and generous contributor to my local PBS TV station and even sent money to a PBS radio station in Phoenix, even though I'm in Tucson. (I liked their jazz better than the local guys.)
That all came to a screeching halt the night that the Whitewater trial convictions were handed down, and any news organization worth its salt was reporting on it.
I can't remember whether it was still "McNeil/Lehrer" or had changed to "The Newshour" but I distinctly remember that rather than going with the story of the day, Jim Lehrer did an "interview" with Hillary Clinton, in which he threw out softball questions, not one of which ever mentioned Whitewater.
This is not to bash the Clintons, they were doing what they do, but for an organization as blatantly biased as this to ask me for money under the guise of "education" and "objectivity" is too much.
I like some of their shows and continue to watch, but whatever tax money they get is the limit of my contributions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toss in Atlanta, too. Weather Channel meteorologists-standing-out-in-storm yesterday were almost being blown away, literally. Totally unnecessary- served only to fill air-time and risk lives.
J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

Go for Roanoke, VA, too. Yesterday, one of the women (and I use the adult noun only to eliminate PC yowling) had herself strapped into the wind tunnel at Virginia Tech up in Blacksburg, and then got the wind cranked up to 100 MPH.
This is at least the third time I've seen a newsidjit do this kind of silly thing. I'm not at all sure what it is supposed to prove to anyone else, as it's not truly dangerous (unless the newsie has an undiscovered heart defect), and, as this one had the sense to admit, leaves out certain things like gusting winds, changing direction of wind, wind being filled with bits and pieces of houses, trees, cars and anything else lying around loose--or not-so-loose. Not to mention rain with drops driven at a speed that is enough to skin the paint off most houses.
But, hey, it sounds impressive. "I was there, in 100 MPH wind." Now, if she bailed out of an aircraft at 20,000 or more feet during a major thunderstorm, she might get closer to the real thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But if she was wearing a wet T shirt and . . . . . . . . . . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

You couldn't have seen much for the harness she was wearing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.