OT: Have we become that stupid ..

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Leon wrote:

See above reply...it's a statistical correlation developed from actual test data on fairly sizable sample populations...
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Feels
... and to paraphrase one of my college math professors many years ago: "Statisticians are mathematicians hired to prove statistically what they can't prove mathematically" ... or words to that effect. :)
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Not to forget the ol' chestnut about 9 out of 10 statisticians being wrong 4 times out of 5.
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I did read it. It is basically BS IMHO. Temperature, humidity, and wind all have a different effect on individuals. Temperature is absolute. "Feels like" is an averaged interpretations which means nothing to any one individual.
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Leon wrote:

Well, actually, when one looks at the data, the "feels" like comparative data aren't spread as widely as you might believe...I don't have the old data sets any longer (this was only about 40 years ago) but the correlations had quite respectable correlation--which implies that the "average Joe" feels pretty much the same way as the other guy at the same conditions...
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I think the power of a suggested "feels like" is more influential. I bet you could put the feels like 1% greater than the actual and the average Joe would agree. Since the average Joe could not tell you what and actual temp feels like any way, adding the "feels like" has him fooled also. What shocks me is that many people think the chill factor of 31 degrees F will freeze water when the actual temp may be 40 degrees F. Before you know it there will be a Wind "Feels Like" factor. It really would fall right in place.
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Leon wrote:

There already is---it's the "feels like" factor and that is termed the wind chill. It's part of the same correlation. While I'll grant there are uneducated and ill-informed who misuse it or don't understand, it has some value for those who do. The wind chill is significant for personal safety in that it does have a relationship to how much faster the body is cooled by wind as opposed to still air, which is a real effect.
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Without running a Google, do you remember the "WBGT"? ... no cheating now. :)
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No I am talking about a future 15 mile per hour wind will "feel like" 45 miles per hour because the humidity is low. It would factor in about the same as wind chill or feels like.
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But how many people know how many gallons are in a barrel? People can sort of visualize 100,000 gallons. But say that it's 2380 barrels, it means nothing to 95% of the population, I'm guessing. At least, it means nothing to me. Yeah, it's a smaller number, so it's not so sensational. But it's also more relevant to people's lives.
For that matter, you don't see weather stations broadcasting hot temperatures in degrees Kelvin, do you? :) Gee, look, its 298 degrees outside! Or, even better 536 degree Rankine (never heard of that till I looked up the conversion for Kelvin).

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"Clint" wrote in message

the way things are going, don't rule it out ...
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You obviously have never been in a storm bad enough that you thought you were going to die in. 100 mph winds are wimp winds. It is the sustained 150+ mph winds with downward micro blasts that hit the ground and spread out at 180 mph that get your attention. Then mix in the tornado's. I became a believer on my 3rd hurricane when I was 15.
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Leon wrote:

Precisely...as I noted in a different response, the difference between 100mph and 150mph windspeed is more than one can comprehend unless one has seen it. For starters, since force is proportional to velocity squared, the actual effect is something like twice the effect, not simply 50%. The buildings w/ sheet metal roofs simply would have gone away, tires and all.
Having seen a sizable number of tornadoes from F0 to F3, the one or two F4 and F5 monsters are simply not believable unless one has actually seen the results. Pictures simply do <not> convey the result adequately.
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Leon wrote:

Sorry, you're wrong. I've been in super-phoons, and I grew up with tornados. I've been sandblasted a lot of times and lost roofs. I've been glad to have a concrete root cellar. I've also done stupid things like chasing down tornados and watching the suspension on my F-100 from the underside. As I said earlier in the thread, it's a question of how this are dealt with.
Dave in Fairfax
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snipped-for-privacy@removethis.rr.com says...

Spokane weather tends to be a bit on the boring side. In 18 years here there's been one ice storm that was a pain, but that's all. Mt St Helens did go off a few years before we moved here, but even then all Spokane got was a lot of ash. A few winters we get a lot of snow, but the locals take that in stride.
So once or twice a summer we have a "thunderstorm" where we hear 3 or 4 rumbles and that's it. When we (rarely) get one that might make a halfway decent "thundershower" in the east, we invariably get a front page picture of lightning and a "massive storm" headline :-).
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lgb wrote: ...

...
That's what I thought in "the east" (while in TN)...headlines would tout 50 mph wind gusts as strong--we think a 50mph wind just a "strong breeze". :)
I did see some of the most impressive lightning shows there, but most often the actual storms were pretty routine...
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Stupid enough that they keep building 'em up and the weather knocks 'em down. Sure glad our benevolent gov't keep throwing money at stuff like this..... Geez. I see this is another excuse to raise oil prices too. Damn rigs will be shutdown for what, 12 hours? How about this; You live in any kinda tornado, hurricane, volcano alley that if you home gets demolished by natural causes you get funds for one rebuild, One! After that your on your own. Start living in grass huts. I don't care who you are your not gonna beat mudder nachur.. (best Teutel dialect applied)
Knothead
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Knothead wrote:

I have to ask, just where the hell do you live where there are no natural disasters?
It's one thing to build in a flood plain, I'll agree that's stupid but there are a half dozen or more entire (or nearly entire) states in Tornado Alley, and an equal number of entire states vulnerable to hurricanes.
Throw in most of the West Coast which is at risk for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and what you have left of the US is at risk for blizzards.
Sheesh.
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It's impossible, I live in snow/tornado country. I'm properly insured, my home is contructed accordingly. My point is simply personal responsibility. Without starting a whole new sideways thread, it's clear to me my taxes are going to pay for this mess. Screw that it's all going to get blown over again likely before they recover from this one. I know that there's history there but sometimes you need to cut the loses and walk away.
Knothead
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Knothead wrote:

To some extent I agree, but...there's no way we can do w/o a major port at the mouth of the Mississippi. That a major residential area and city should be below sea level is perhaps a problem. In general, some risks are necessary, but there should be an incentive now to reconsider how to better deal w/ them going forward.
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