OT: Have we become that stupid ..

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And I fully agree with the OP (you) about the talking heads, and what value they add by standing in the middle of the hurricane going "Gee, the wind is really strong out right now", and then demonstrating it by opening their jackets up and taking flight.
But my comments were to the follow up posters, and I mentioned specifically "the two previous poster's compassion". They're the ones I don't understand. Comments like "When did we become weather wimps?" and "They were good for parties afterwards while the gov tried to get the electricity back up."
Clint

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Clint wrote:

...
...
I think the general public has become "wimps" in many ways besides weather. That doesn't minimize the effect on those affected, but there is a rising level of unawareness of what Nature has to offer and an apparent expectation that the results of poor judgement should be mitigated by others than those who made the poor decision.
As for the parties afterwards, those could only be true in the aftermath of something much less destructive than areas in the middle of such a storm as Katrina. It's a case of thinking one has been through an event when in fact the actual event is <far> worse than that particular person can imagine. The difference between 100 mph and 150 mph windspeeds and being on the actual coast and below the storm surge is absolutely incomparable to the effects inland and higher elevation.
Same thing as the difference between an F0 little tornado and the massive F5 that scours absolutely everything down to bare earth--one can ride out the former w/ reasonable chances of success--the latter is something else again entirely.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

That's what happens when the only contact the average citizen has with nature is among smelly hippies hiking in their local Sierra Club chapter. If more people were exposed to nature as it is - for example by hunting, fishing, and camping without the benefit of a microwave, RV, and satellite TV - they would develop a much finer appreciation of the vast power and potential for devistation found in natural processes. Instead, we get the earth-worshipping freaks as the only contact many people have with real nature. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com PGP Key: http://www.tundraware.com/PGP /
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Tim Daneliuk wrote: ...

I think we would simply get more costly rescues required, myself... :(
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

That's fine - just make the recipients pay for them. At the very least, de-federalize it and make it a state-run thing.
--
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Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
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Tim Daneliuk wrote:

My major problem is their stupidity putting others' lives at risk, not $$$. Although, that too, is somewhat of a sore spot it's a lesser one than the unnecessary risk....
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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 13:57:14 -0400, Tim Daneliuk wrote:
another load of ignorant tripe. PLONK
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Brilliant Riposte' - your reasoning is inarguable...
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Swingman wrote:

...
No, I stay out of those (other than asking for some technical data references in one ages ago)... :)
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"Clint" wrote in message

specifically
Sorry, you are certainly correct. My mistake ... I apologize.
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Clint wrote: snip

OK, I'll point something else out that you must not have thought of. Houses with tin roofs don't last long in those winds. W/o electricity there's no water, or food, or much of anything else. In a large country you can get lots of help from a bunch of people, on an island you're on your own. Do a search on typhoon and see what it does to the Phillipines. Compare that to what happens in the gulf. The parties were to use the food so that people didn't starve before it rotted. Last I'm saying on this topic.
Dave in Fairfax
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Clint wrote:

But the question remains: When did we become weather wimps? This hurricane, and the ones of the last few years since the advent of 24 hour filler posing as news (damn you, Ted Turner), were no less devastating than those in the more distant past. Difference is that we are now forced to look at the same flooded streets every 5 minutes throughout the day. If you are affected by the storm(s), you are looking at it real time, without the TV running. This "reporting" doesn't help you. If you have loved ones in the area, I am sure property damage and death estimates are not what you wish to pass the time with while you wait for the phone to ring. Personally, I wish there was still the test pattern after Carson that lasted until The National Anthem and "High Flight", followed by cartoons.
As far as the parties after the storm are concerned, what else would you have a community do? Sit around bemoaning their plight? No. People are resilient, the community will find ways to bond, rebuild, and help each other through the devestation.
Living as I currently do, on a little rock in the Pacific prone to typhoons (2 coming in the next 4 days, one last week), I would have to say that long term preparedness goes a long way towards developing the "post storm" attitude. The houses are concrete, hotels and high rises are angled so as to avoid the brunt of the prevailing wind. I'll go out in the morning, put the van back upright, and see if my neighbor has any beef he doesn't want to have to throw away.
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David Sizemore wrote:

The biggest real difference in the US is the continued expansion into the vulnerable areas w/ insufficient preparation for the inevitable. Thus the amount of damage is bound to be more and the <apparent> (as opposed to real) severity is exaggerated. Of course, as you note, it doesn't help that the 24-hr channels "need" events and the public attention span in the US is now on the order of milliseconds...
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wrote:

Ahh, that takes me back. I loved the shot of the F104 doing a roll. That's also my favorite poem.
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Clint wrote: Lots of snippage:

The discussion started out about the stupidity of the newcasters and those who watch them so avidly. Most of this world has to deal with far worse weather related destruction on a regular basis. The death and destruction is taken is stride without the hype by the news people. Take a look at the Pacific and see what a typhoon is like then compare the results to what happened with Katrina. I wasn't being hard-hearted, I was pointing out a different way of dealing with the same phenomenon. If you think it's hard-hearted, try keeping a store running in 100 mph winds so that people can buy supplies then closing out the store and driving home in what are now, far more than 100 mph winds.
Dave in Fairfax
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Clint wrote:

Well, I don't think OP meant to underrate the severity of the storm, rather it was a criticism of the reporting. The reporters in the street were commenting on how much it was raining and how hard the wind was blowing, neither of which was exactly newsworthy, INSTEAD of giving us hard facts like how large an area was flooded and inhabitable, how many buildings destroyed, how many people were now homeless and so on.
Of course the reporters in the field didn't have those facts at hand because the storm cut them off from communicating with anybody but their home station and people immediatedly at hand.
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It is apparent that my remarks are not being properly understood.
My remarks are NOT about a lack of compassion for those affected by truly major disasters. For those affected by weather events of truly epic proportions, my heart goes out to them.
My remarks though do apply to the "storm team" forecasters that turn the most minor weather event into a harbinger of doom. It's the wall to wall coverage of a snow storm that leaves the ground barely covered or the "thunderstorm" that hardly leaves my lawn wet that grind my beans. Those people are doing a great job of desensitizing people to the times when a real disaster is happening. When every storm is life threatening, how do you know when the real thing comes along? A real disaster is not the normal 5" snowfall. The real one is the 20 incher that paralyzes the city, not the one that makes it inconvenient for the Dominoes delivery guy. The same could be said for temperatures.
There is a difference, not that you could tell by watching WTMJ or WISN.
We also know that hurricanes have high winds and prodigious amounts of rain. Is it necessary, does it add anything to our knowledge to show a reporter announcing those facts in a live report? For the 10th (or more) time?
Although I feel bad for those that are losing everything, they also know they live in a risky area weatherwise. Why live so close to the shore? Why live in a city where significant amounts of it are below sea level? Where do they think the water's going to go when the big hurricane finally comes calling?
And why aren't houses in such areas built a little more sturdily? I recall stories about the home the mother of former attorney general Janet Reno built. Apparently when hurricane Andrew came calling several years ago her home was one that sustained no or minimal damage.
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"George Max" wrote in message

It started, to my mind, with the TV reporting of oil spills in gallons instead of barrels, progressing to the point that "teacups" will soon be required to maintain the impact value. From there we've gone to routinely reporting, and accepting without question, current weather temperatures in "feels like" terms, which are unquantifiable but certainly more sensational.
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Swingman wrote: ...

Actually the "feels like" factors were developed from data collected in extensive studies of which a professor at Uni was a major participant while I was an undergrad. A complete lab was built and volunteers were paid the princely some of something like $1.50/hr to participate. It was a pretty popular way to get paid for studying albeit sometimes a little hard to concentrate... :)
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I recall discussing the "feels like factor" in Physics while in college. The professor just laughed and we later termed it the "wus factor". Feels like to who exactly?
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