OT FIRST RUN WOODWORKS

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wrote:

Neato?
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wrote:

Okay!! We have a winner!
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Robatoy wrote:

You're right! That's just the cat's meow!
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Woodie wrote:

23-skidoo to all of you.
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On Mon, 5 May 2008 22:02:26 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I know the feeling!
However, if I find it truly desirable, I save money by buying the previous "in thing"... Used! <G>
I can't tell you where the "IN" places are, either, 'cause I always look out of place there.
My wife throws out my clothes and shoes when I'm not looking!
I buy reconditioned and used tools, bring usable things home from the dump... I am good about not pack ratting, only getting and keeping what I truly use. Unused, but usable stuff goes to eBay.
About the only thing I'll spring for new are GOOD tools that I can't find used, and vehicles, as I drive them to the grave and like them to have the features and colors I want. If I'm going to live with a vehicle for 10-15 years, I'm getting what I like.
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I have some really strange looking shirts that I wear from time to time, courtesy of Good Will. Some days I look like a bowler, sometimes an old redneck retread, and other times just weird.
I had a guy that worked for me for years as a painter, and I noticed that he almost never had shirts with a lot of crap on them. He told me that his wife bought shirts at GW for $3, and he wore them until they were all gooped and painted, then they went in the trash.
So now, I save all my nice shirts for "estimatin' " days, or days when I have lunches I have to go to. When I am doing repairs, finishing or painting, or anything else that will surely get on my clothes I wear GW shirts. Got some funky ones, to be sure. I remember wearing some of these styles back in the 70s...

Now if I could only convince the SO that air conditioning in the briefs is not only a natural but expected event from thoughtful wear and good service. She sees holes; I see provenance. She refers to them as "gross"; I call them comfortable. Go figure.
Robert
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On Tue, 6 May 2008 14:30:37 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Point out that out underwear has less holes than the "Chain link" cat suits that we'd like them to wear! <G>
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Oh hell, yeah!
I don't think I would win any points with that argument, but thanks for the picture.
And somehow... me in the holy skivvies isn't the same....
ROTFLMAO!!
Robert
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wrote:

That is a lot more information....
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Come on...
I say "respect the pair".
After all, a good set of briefs does a job you'd never ask any man to do... (right??)
Robert
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    Looks like he's found a way to do his show - tattoo and all - on his terms:     
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QUNTpYq3Ys

    Looks like he just added it a couple weeks ago, be neat to see where he takes it.
    Sean
--
"If I had six hours to chop down a tree, I'd spend the first four hours
sharpening the axe".
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<< Looks like he's found a way to do his show - tattoo and all - on his terms:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QUNTpYq3Ys

Looks like he just added it a couple weeks ago, be neat to see where he takes it.>>
Well, the first place he needs to take it is someplace where he can obtain a wireless mic. It's great to see David giving new woodworking demonstrations/lessons, but it would be better to also be able to hear him.
Lee
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"Swingman" wrote

Word to the wise wooddorker:
This is a GREAT video to watch with your SWMBO. AAMOF, it should be made a mandatory SWMBO duty, for indeed, a great amount of woodworking mileage, karma, blessings, understanding, and maybe even a tool or two, can be obtained by familiarity therewith. DAMHIKT.
Insist upon it ...
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You know Swing, that was a pretty good video. I was surprised to see how accessible and easy going Marks was.
He came to our sunny town about three years ago shilling something for Woodcraft. Here for the day only, it was treated as the second coming. The boys of the woodworking club and the staff at WC were positively giddy with excitement.
He got here, and by all accounts, he was abrupt and hurried. It was obvious that it was an obligation. He did not want to share woodworking stories with any of them, and made that clear. But he really rubbed the woodworking club members the wrong way at his reaction to a piece they brought forward for his blessing.
One of the guys had made one of Marks' tables, and had gotten so many compliments on it that he decided to teach others how to make it. (That meant he was now a woodworking instructor, right?) This guy had made several of these tables along with his classes, and was feeling pretty good about his work.
Without knowing who the instructor or artisan actually was, he looked over the table and rendered a pretty seething commentary on how it was made, how the joints were assembled, how the veneer trims were installed and really hammered the finish.
Marks did not know that they "instructor" was standing right there with him, and his words cut really deep. As for me, I saw the table and I must say I have seen better and I have seen worse. (Although, I must say in Marks' defense that the finish looked like it was put on with a flooring trowel.)
Maybe he was rushed, maybe he didn't want to be there, maybe there was trouble at home, who knows. But he cut so deeply that the guy quit his instruction and won't teach anyone anything anymore.
In my opinion, Marks was wrong. There were all these older retirees, younger hobby guys, garage woodworkers, etc., that were just looking for a pat on the back. I know there are many that feel like the cold light of truth is always the best way to view things, but I am not one of them. Those guys knew there work wasn't perfect, they just wanted a nod and a "man, that looks nice". They would have have been "proud to bust" and had bragging rights for 10 years over a compliment.
And it isn't like these guys were even trying to make it as cabinet or furniture makers. I get a charge out of some of them as they told me that it takes so damn long for them to do anything that they would starve to death unless they charged by the hour. But, the allow that if they charged by the hour they would be rich!
Since I do this for a living like you do, I run into two different kinds of folks that do woodworking. There are those that don't want me to see their work. I always find ways to compliment them. Always. They turn beet red when their SO says from the kitchen "honey, did you show Robert the XXX you made?". I always finds something positive to say. On the other hand, from time to time I am surprised and run into a fellow that is as good as any professional, so it is easy to be complimentary. I find that most non-professional woodworkers have a good sense of humility, and are in the crafts to enjoy them more than anything else.
The other kind is the one that cannot wait for me to see what he has done. These were the guys that were at the Marks show at WC. And yes, these guys get compliments, too. Why not? They aren't pros, and don't pretend to be. Sometimes they ask for tips, sometimes I offer one or two. It is always a positive experience. And if they turn out to be clients, more than once I have had wives come to me and tell me how much they appreciated me taking the time to examine a project and pass on some compliments.
I think the art of a carefully crafted compliment is a good habit to have, and one that is also lost these days. It costs nothing, and given the right way you aren't pandering or insincere. But you can sure do a lot of good with it.
I think it is interesting that Marks speaks highly of others and his students and assistants, and he seemed sincere in the video since he obviously didn't have to bring it up at all. And he was really nice to that young guy and his wife.
Maybe when he came here he was just having a bad day.
Off the soap box now.
Robert
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I don't know Marks at all, so I can't say.
However, and unless/until you've dealt with the truly artistic on a professional level, you have no idea how critical they can be of other's of the same ilk, and at the same time be completely crushed by the tiniest criticism of their own efforts ... it appears both these elements appear in your story. :)
I will say that I've had similar experiences in the studio being _forced_ to make judgments about songs, music, vocals, etc. as to suitability for recording and/or including in a project, and I'm probably more like Mark's was at that particular moment ... if it sucks, it sucks, and it certainly won't make the creator/artist a better songwriter/musician to be told how wonderful their bad song/part is.
AAMOF, you are ultimately, and in reality, doing them a favor, not to mention doing what you're paid to do.
That said, a considerate person will usually insure that constructive, or destructive as the case may be, criticism always includes suggestions for improvement. In the studio where 'magic musical moments' are the most sought after pearls, it is imperative because a creative person can be so crushed as to no longer be able to perform.
Sound familiar?
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Swingman wrote:

Think music and woodworking are two different talents. In music, vocals or composing you either have it or you don't. Woodworking, talent can be taught or developed. A true woodworking artist takes time to develop. A true musical artist is a god given talent.
So yes it is a good idea to let the less talented musician know right away he sucks. Let the woodworker develop his talent without critical criticism.
Just my 2 sense. Rich
--
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but you can't make them THINK"
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evodawg wrote:

I disagree. Talent is innate, skill is learned.
A true artist of any sort must have talent, but that just means that it makes it easier to learn the skills. They still need to put in the time to develop their skills.
On the flip side, it's possible to learn most skills without having a talent for them...it's just more painful and takes longer.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote: ...

But the level of skill won't approach that of somebody w/ talent who also hones their skill.
Most will not become Tiger no matter how much golf they play.
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Fair enough.
r
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Come back after a couple of years and you will wonder how the hell it ever worked. Happened to me on one of my first efforts and I ended up a systems engineer.
P D Q
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