OT: Electrical

Anyone know what the code in NC is for outlet spacing in a garage? I want to add another circuit (15A 120V)and the easiest for me is to drop straight down below the breaker panel. Problem is I have already done that for another circuit (240V). If I am required to be separated form the first outlet by a code distance then I am going to need to drill through wall studs (cringe).
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On 2/7/2013 12:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

No problem.
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Awesome. Thank you.
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On Thursday, February 7, 2013 1:49:45 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

Thank you.

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On Thu, 7 Feb 2013 10:04:26 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

add another circuit (15A 120V)and the easiest for me is to drop straight down below the breaker panel. Problem is I have already done that for another circuit (240V). If I am required to be separated form the first outlet by a code distance then I am going to need to drill through wall studs (cringe).
Don't know your local codes but NEC only specifies a maximum distance for spacing between residential outlets. I would also go with a 20 amp circuit unless you know you'll never want to plug any higher power tools in.
Mike M
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On 2/7/2013 1:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

add another circuit (15A 120V)and the easiest for me is to drop straight down below the breaker panel. Problem is I have already done that for another circuit (240V). If I am required to be separated form the first outlet by a code distance then I am going to need to drill through wall studs (cringe).

They make boxes where you can take off the sides and attach them together, I have seen about six together pass code inspections here so I would be surprised if there is a minimum distance.
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snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote in

I can't speak to what your state codes might say... but I've never seen anything in the National Electrical Code that dictates any *minimum* spacing between outlets anywhere. There are rules regarding *maximum* spacing (e.g. no point on a wall may be more than __ inches away from an outlet), but not minimum spacing AFAIK.
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On Thursday, February 7, 2013 2:43:31 PM UTC-5, Doug Miller wrote:

Cool. Sounds like I'm good to go. The wealth of knowledge on the wrec never stops amazing me.
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On Thu, 7 Feb 2013 11:47:48 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Swing by your local Home Depot and pick up a stubby Bosch Daredevil spade bit. They're by far the most aggressive beasties I've ever used in my life. Scary-fast and only about $3.
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On 2/7/2013 4:11 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I am planning on running some new circuit in my garage before putting up dry wall and finishing. What are the regulation for those holes I will have to put through the studs to run the wires. I can not go into the ceiling and drop down through the header to go between studs.
I can not believe they are building garages with only 15amp circuits.
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On Thursday, February 7, 2013 6:56:10 PM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

You'll be glad they are when you're using extension cords rated at 15A.
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On 02/07/2013 05:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Soooo, you wouldn't let your wife plug a 1000W hair dryer into a 20A circuit?
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If the edge of the hole is not a minimum of 1-1/4" from the edge of the stud, you need to attach a steel plate to the edge of the stud, centered over the hole. This is to protect the cable from the fasteners used to attach drywall. You can buy the plates at the Borg cheap.

AFAIK, the only places the Code requires 20A circuits are kitchen and bathrooms. Most people don't have table saws in their garages... really.
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No.

Probably never had an inspector spot a cable passing through a hole that was drilled too close to the edge of the stud.

Sorry, Mike, there's something wrong with your math. Drill a 1/2" hole through the center of a 2x4 stud. There's still 1-1/2" of wood on either side of it. Even a 1"-diameter hole drilled through the center of a stud still complies.
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On 2/7/2013 8:43 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

You mean there are actually people whose wives allow them to put a table saw in the living room?
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Nah... They'd still only have 15A breakers in there. You've got to do the woodworking in the ktichen or bathroom. If you've got one of the granite topped saws, make sure it goes with the decor!
Puckdropper
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On Thu, 7 Feb 2013 21:54:36 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Not sure if it is 1.25" - but the requirement has been code since about 1965. - if you can't drill the center of the 2X4, you plate it.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

It is 1.25", and you don't have to drill in the exact center to meet the requirement. A 1/2" diameter hole, centered 1 1/2" from the edge of the stud (i.e. 1/4" off-center) still meets the requirement.

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On Thu, 07 Feb 2013 18:56:10 -0500, Keith Nuttle

Check with the local inspectors and build to what they want to see. Even if you read the NEC and followed it exactly (if anyone ever has) the local inspectors may have additional regs for your area. They're the last word, so ask them. Then they can easily sign it off when they do the inspection, knowing that you followed their specs.
2 suggestions: 1) put the outlets above 4' height for ease of use. and 2) paint the walls, ceiling, and floor with eggshell pure white paint. It cuts your lighting needs by half, and makes it easier to find dropped hardware on the floor. Floor and porch paint lasts for years and touches up easily.
Here's an older NEC online for reference. She's a beeyotch to read. http://www.mikeholt.com/technical.php?id=nec/technicalnecfreestuff

Ditto.
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