OT: dentist

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On 12/20/2013 2:02 PM, Leon wrote:

Wrong. Maybe you got lost in the thread. To recap: snipped-for-privacy@none.com posted: "... other than ensuring the accuracy and universality of the record keeping, government shouldn't need to know the content of those records." I questioned the federal government's constitutional power to act in that area: "Where in the United States Constitution does it say that Congress shall have the power to enact laws regulating the accuracy and universality of medical record keeping?" I think there is no such authority. If snipped-for-privacy@non.com or anyone else thinks the government should be able to ensure (or otherwise regulate) the accuracy and universality of medical recordkeeping, the burden is on those who advocate in favor of that position to support it.
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Constitution? They don' need no steenkin' constitution.
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dadiOH
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On 12/20/2013 5:48 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Exactly
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On 12/20/2013 7:46 PM, Leon wrote:

Barack, baby? You here?
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wrote:

Nowhere. With one exception, the Constitution has nothing to do with individuals. It *only* addresses what the US government *can* do (not what it can't). It is *only* a limitation on the government.
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I was the IT manager of an family practice metical clinic that implemented an electronic medical records system a decade before Obamacare was a twinkle in Mit Romenys eye. Was very expensive to implement both in capital costs and implementation. Why bother? Simply because it was the only way for them to get vaguely timely payments from the insurance companies.
In many ways this provision of ACA is another benefit to the insurance industry.

Untrue. Do you realized that many specialist have been outsourced? Lab results for anything other than the most trival tests are rarely done in-house. Way too expensive to have an in-house equipement to do, say, blood gases when you may only have to do a handful in a year. Do you realize that the interpretation of x-rays and sonagrams are often done by specialist many miles or even countries away?
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Frank Stutzman
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On 12/20/2013 9:30 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Agree on government involvement.

Not that simple. My wife went into a hospital about 500 miles from home on a Sunday when her regular doctor's office is closed. Would have been nice to have some additional information.

Happens more than you think. Again, personal experience when my wife needs her blood checked when we travel. My daughter had a CT scan at our hospital about a mile from us, but the results came from a doctor that read the scan 250 miles away at a Philadelphia hospital.
While the government does not need to be involved, having access can be life saving. Perhaps a person could carry an electronic key to be used when needed.
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On 12/19/2013 11:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Not to mention that the government has been spying on us for decades. Like seasonal changes it is in the open and the general public is now aware of it because of the easy pick'ins news coverage.
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wrote in message

Yes, the list does go on and on... As the ultimate payer for Medicare and Medicaid the government has and will continue to collect medical data on anyone covered under those programs. With subsidies under ACA they also now have an interest from the payer perspective for commercial lines of business. They use the medical encounter data to ferret out fraud (which historically has been rampant) and they also monitor the quality of care providers render. Under CMS's Stars program the insurance companies are reimbursed based on the quality of care their providers render. As such the plans analyze the encounter data and undertake provider education initiatives so that providers follow best practices. Members shopping Docs to obtain drugs are also identified through the data. You may have heard about insurance companies terminating contracts with thousands of providers recently... the vast majority of those cases were the result of the provider not following best practices, i.e., rendering inadequate care, often despite years of interventions by the plans.
Self funded plans (where a company pays the claims themselves) have an interest in improving the care and health of their employees also. While they don't see the individual employees' data they do see aggregated data... they want to see an improvement in their employees' health over time. This improvement comes about as a result of health improvement programs (e.g., stop smoking, exercise, nutrition) and through high quality preventative care.
Regarding privacy in the U.S... we have no privacy. Whether it's health data, surveillance cameras, credit card transaction data, loyalty programs at stores, education systems, internet, TV and phone utilization records... we are all under surveillance with or without government involvement.
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On 12/21/2013 9:11 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

feet were inked and stamped on your birth certificate.
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On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 14:44:00 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

He didn't say that or even suggest it. It was just a statement of fact. You seem to believe that allowing or disallowing another technology improvement is going to change something. It won't. The horse is so far out of the barn on that one that it's in another country.
Nevertheless, I do understand the need to fight against every little incursion on your privacy, if only just to marginally slow it down or, at the very least, get your displeasure known.
As far as digitizing medical records go, I'm all for it. The advantages far outweigh the negatives as far as I'm concerned. And, considering that I've had years of extensive contact with our medical system, (Canadian in this case), I am fully aware of all the negatives and positives.
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On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 17:25:13 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

You said it right here despite me and several others telling you about the advantages of putting all records online. Got a little memory problem there Mike? V V V V V V V V V V

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On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 20:17:33 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Obviously, we're not agreeing to what "online" means. When I say "online", I'm not for one second suggesting that records put made available for any medical professional to see at the click of a mouse. Sending records across the country at the speed of an electron *IS* putting them online, if only for the time it takes to send those records. Electronic transmission is an online process as far as I'm concerned.
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On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 22:14:10 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

My apologies for any misinterpretation.
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On 12/19/2013 7:43 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

My daughter manages a dental office. It was bought by the present owner for over $1million. You can be sure this guy has a big nut every month too. She just left for vacation so I can't verify the prices right now. Fillings seem high though.
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On Fri, 20 Dec 2013 00:43:17 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

my dentist charges $750 for a crown
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Prices vary. I went to one guy for cleaning. He wasn't my usual dentist but she is a considerable distance away. He advised me I needed to have "deep cleaning". I don't recall the price but it was in four figures. I declined and checked with my regular dentist...her price was 1/4 his.
Your prices do seem high but I've had very little contact with dentists. I only have two small fillings and I didn't have any until I was about 75. I don't recall the price for them but I guarantee that the cost for both was well under $525.
Check around...call and ask price info for fillings and crowns.
Here's a site saying $75-$150 for silver fillings.
http://bestdentaltips.wordpress.com/2013/02/05/how-much-does-a-cavity-filling-typically-cost-without-dental-insurance/
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On 12/20/2013 7:17 AM, dadiOH wrote:

About two years ago, I went to a dentist who recomended a deep cleaning. Within a week I had an infected tooth which I lost a couple of months later.
I am nearly 70 and have never had problems with my teeth, and only have about a half dozen minor filling. So the net results of the deep clean I was up about 1000 for the cleaning plus the cost of the dentist associated with the removal of the tooth.
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A lot depends on the dentist. A local "Modern Dentist" sent flyers for $29 cleaning plus X-rays and pictures with a free electric tooth brush. The results were I was not eligible for that cleaning because I had periodontal disease so I needed their $1000 cleaning. There were 2 crowns they would like to replace at $2000 each and 3 fillings for $400 each. The pictures were first class, the 3d x-rays were amazing. The office was high tech. I went elsewhere.
I went to an old fashion dentist. His office straight out of the 70's. Cleaning is $75. One crown has a small hole with the underlying tooth is sound. If it becomes a problem he can fill it through the hole. At 40 years old it is still perfectly sound. He did 3 surfaces with UV cured acrylic material. It took an hour and he charged $112. I have had literally hundreds of cavities filled using this technology with out a problem.
The first dentist I went to had a foot powered drill. He peddled it like an old sewing machine. About $1 per filling, but that was 70 years ago.
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On 12/19/2013 4:43 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

in the profession. On your next visit, note that the dentist is forever looking down in the mouth.     mahalo,     jo4hn [nyuk]
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